Ready4Air (TV) | Reporter Go-To Stories For The Summer

Lyndsay Christian, FiOS1 News
Photo Credit: Lyndsay Christian

June 23, 2015 | Posted in Social TV | By

Lyndsay Christian, FiOS1 NewsPhoto Credit: Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian, FiOS1 News
Photo Credit: Lyndsay Christian

By Lyndsay Christian

It’s that time of the year when the sun dictates creative content. If ever you’re stuck on story ideas, here’s a list of go-to story summer ideas. Below are suggested building blocks divided categorically. Be creative!

Beach

  • Swimming safety: Interview a lifeguard about appropriate swimming procedures at the beach. What to look for in the waves, tides, winds, etc. How far out should one swim?
  • Activities for families.

Summer Travel

  • Travel deals: Interview a travel agent about the best time to book trips, websites with hot deals, etc.
  • Preparing your family for a road trip.
  • Packing essentials, car preps, air travel preps, etc.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | 5 Tips For Writing And Asking Good Interview Questions

Attire/Wardrobe

  • Summer dresses: Looks for less. Stylist and models can demo high vs. low outfits.
  • Transitioning looks from spring to summer and summer to fall.
  • Stretching wardrobe.
  • Creative mixes.

Summer Health

  • Skin health: Interview a dermatologist about the different types of appropriate sunscreen and skin protection for all skin types.
  • Body: Interview a physician about staying safe in the heat, keeping the body hydrated, summer diet, etc.
  • Exercise: Interview a personal trainer to demonstrate easy exercises for at-home conditioning and toning.

The summer also lends itself to fun stand-up opportunities. Communicate with your photographer and think of creative ways to add visual elements to stories.

Happy Summer!

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | Reporter Go-To Stories For The End Of The Year

 

Lyndsay

TV personality Lyndsay Christian
Photo credit: Brandon Cooper

Lyndsay Christian is a television personality for FiOS1 News and media consultant in the New York City area. Follow her on Twitter @LynzChristian.

####

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) Storytelling in a culturally and racially diverse newsroom

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (TV) | Keeping Time With Television Line Producer Steven Ramey

Arise On Screen Line Producer Steven Ramey
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

December 9, 2014 | Posted in Social TV | By

Arise On Screen Line Producer Steven Ramey Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen Line Producer Steven Ramey
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

I’m excited to finally be sitting down with line producer Steven Ramey for a Ready4Air interview. He’s been putting it off for almost a year. Why? Because he is super busy. This interview is happening late on a Tuesday night–probably between 9:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m.  The weekly taped show Arise On Screen is Steven’s second gig at the network. In his full-time day job, he is a senior producer for Arise America, the daily  live one-hour news show. I asked how he’s feeling and what his day was like with the news show.
 
Well, I’m happy to have a break. It’s been an exciting day for production because the Arise America shooting schedule was a little bit in flux, so as usual, we were under a lot of time pressure. We were happy to shoot and get on tape everything that we needed to put up the show without any mistakes. With some editing, nobody at home would be the wiser as to how we were able to pull everything together.
Executive Producer Debbie Mitchell and Line Producer Steven Ramey in Arise On Screen control room Photo Credit: Nick Viagas/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Executive Producer Debbie Mitchell and Line Producer Steven Ramey in Arise On Screen control room
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Steve, tell me more about what you do in your second job as a line producer for Arise On Screen.
The most important thing we do as line producers is to keep the show on track time-wise. We make sure that we don’t end up shooting more interview than we need to fill the time because it can be very laborious to go back in and tease out all the great ideas and conversations and decide what to cut out. That post-production work is very time consuming, as opposed to shooting to time in the first place. That’s why great pre-production is important. You have to have a direction and objective in the conversation so you get what you need while you’re in the studio. You have to get to the story that you want to tell quickly.
What are the pressures and differences for broadcast and line producers between a live and a taped show?
The main difference is that the broadcast producer is a producer on a live show, whereas, from what I understand, the line producer is for taped production. In live television, there is a huge amount of pressure. You have real deadlines–literally minutes–where a clock is timing you down to a commercial or a live event that you want to hit and you want to cover in real time. It adds a lot of pressure in producing.
Arise On Screen Line Producer Steven Ramey Photo Credit: Nick Viagas/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen Line Producer Steven Ramey
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 Tell me about timing and the role time plays in your job. 
I’ve learned over my years of experience to respect time, so that if there’s a deadline or something is supposed to happen in a matter of minutes or seconds, you have to be honest with yourself about what is feasible in that timeframe. Learn to tell the best story in your allotted time. It’s better to underestimate than to overestimate your capabilities, because overestimating means that you will fall short. It’s better to undershoot and be surprised and have a little bit of wiggle room than to think that you’re going to pull off this magnificent edit in 90 seconds if everything lines up right. Really, you’re shooting yourself in the foot.
Arise On Scree Line Producer Steven Ramey Photo Credit: Nick Viagas/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen Line Producer Steven Ramey
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Is this job for everybody? What personality traits or characteristics are a good  fit for this job?
I think you have to be able to handle stimuli from different directions because you’re overseeing components that have to come together in order to put the show on. You have to simultaneously juggle the guests, the story, and all it’s elements, and at the same time you have to keep the director and the talent aware of what pieces are at play and keep everybody on the same page.
Arise On Screen Line Producer Steven Ramey and Executive Producer Debbie Mitchell on our way to the Cannes Film Festival, May 2014 Selfie credit: Debbie Mitchell /Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen Line Producer Steven Ramey and Executive Producer Debbie Mitchell on our way to the Cannes Film Festival, May 2014.
Selfie credit: Debbie Mitchell /Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

You and I went  on the road together when we traveled to the 2014 Cannes Film Festival in France. Tell me about some of the highlights and challenges of doing your job on the road. 
Arise On Screen and Arise Entertainment 360 crew at the Cannes Film Festival, May 2014 Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen and Arise Entertainment 360 crew at the Cannes Film Festival, May 2014
Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

As lovely as a remote sounds and as romantic and sexy as the South of France sounds on tape, when you’ve got a show to produce and deadlines to meet, it’s not as sexy. I enjoyed it because I had friends such as Debbie with me. We have some great memories, we shot some great stories, and I recall great conversations with great people. We interviewed a Chinese director and filmmaker and actor in Chinese with an interpreter. It was really great to shoot this interview and produce it and air it in Chinese! Also, it was interesting and exciting to see people be excited to see us there. They could see this black-owned and operated TV news crew covering the Cannes Film Festival for people that look like us and to share stories that matter to us and are about us. Because Cannes is an international story, I think it impressed a lot of people to see us there.
Arise On Screen Production Meeting Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen Production Meeting
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Our show production team is very small. How does it affect your job?
At Arise On Screen, we have a small yet nimble team and we appreciate everybody’s hard work. We have a team where we can say everybody showed up with their “A” game today, where the anchors and guest co-hosts are  in top form. We, the producers, also have to be in top form when preparing information for the talent and when pre-producing elements and copy. In the end, we show up and give it our best, and we are proud of our work. These days, even if there is a lot of work, we are having  a lot of fun. We can say, “It doesn’t feel like work” and we tell good stories.
Thank You Steve!
 
NOTE*** While Steven’s title is line producer for Arise On Screen, he does so much more. His editorial judgement and keen editing abilities is only surpassed by his patience, creativity and easygoing demeanor. While we work hard, we find time to laugh a lot. Our little team wouldn’t be the same without him. I love having you by my side Mr. Ramey !
 
 
 ###Coming up: The Rundown- A Show’s Production Roadmap 

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (TV) | Reporter Go-To Stories For The End Of The Year

Lyndsay Christian. TV Personality

December 2, 2014 | Posted in Social TV | By

Lyndsay Christian , Host and Producer of On the Scene Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian, host and producer of On the Scene
Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

The holidays are a collective gift to journalists! November and December bring a variety of go-to stories that don’t require much thought but do require creativity. Here are some ideas to keep in your back pocket that you can take out annually. Think about using the same formula and changing the variables.

The month of November presents three main topics that can spark story ideas: Movember (Prostate Cancer Awareness Month), Thanksgiving, and Black Friday. December presents one main topic that speaks for itself. Here are some new and different ways to consider story angles:

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | The Top 4 Things Reporters Look For When Developing A Good Story

Movember

  • Survivors of prostate cancer
  • The story behind growing out a beard for Movember

Thanksgiving

  • City officials serving homeless community
  • Citywide feasts (Thanksgiving Day)
  • Families whose loved ones are in Afghanistan
  • Special deals for families on Thanksgiving Day

Black Friday

  • Shoppers camping out in front of stores
  • Man-on-the-street interviews inside shopping malls about the shopping experience
  • Top five deals in your city

Related Post: So You Want To Be On TV: It’s All In The Timing – TV Timing

December/Christmas

  • Top three ways to avoid family stress
  • Best shopping deals in your city
  • Philanthropy
  • Families spending their first Christmas in their new Habitat for Humanity home

Use your imagination, and you’ll develop a hefty arsenal of story ideas for future reference.

Lyndsay Christian. TV Personality

TV personality Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian is a television personality and media consultant in the New York City area. Follow her @LynzChristian

###
Coming Up: DJ Fulano on Ready4Air 
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air TV: Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Avoid Doing When Booking Me as a Guest

Photo Courtesy of Heidi Skonlik

February 18, 2014 | Posted in Pros Talk TV And Social Media, Social TV, TV Production | By

 

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

In her post last week, Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Do When Booking Me As A Guest,  Heidi Skolnik, an expert who appears regularly on television, shared a few tips on what producers can do for any guest who wants to have a professional and successful television appearance. Skolnik has learned a few things working with producers over the years.

Skolnik explained, “When working with television producers, I have come to learn which moves help make an appearance be the best it can, and which ones you want to avoid. Look for clarity and feedback, and you’ll be please to see all that television producers can do for you.”

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | The Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Do When Booking Me As A Guest

Today in her guest post, Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Avoid Doing When Booking Me As A Guest, Skolnik shares the flip side of the coin and tells us what producers should AVOID doing when booking her on their show.

Top on the list, don’t call her by the wrong name!

Photo Courtesy of Heidi Skonlik

Photo Courtesy of Heidi Skonlik

By Heidi Skolnik 

Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Avoid Doing When Booking Me As A Guest

Call me by the Wrong Name

I value accuracy in my field, and I hope that producers do the same. Once a mistake has been made live there’s no going back. It’s okay if someone checks before we start to avoid any mix-ups on air.

Micromanage your Information

I am always flattered when a producer wants my expertise and I love to share what I know with the public. If a producer is booking me I hope that they can trust my information so that I can be the best professional that I can and feel comfortable sharing my own creativity and opinion.

Not Call Again!

Although I am being a bit flippant here, I always appreciate feedback. If I did not meet expectations, I would love to know why or how I can improve. If I did a great job, I would the opportunity to be back on the show.

Heidi Skolnik, MS, CDN, FACSM, is owner of Nutrition Conditioning, Inc., a nutrition consulting practice that helps individuals, teams, and organizations achieve health and performance goals, serving the greater New York Metropolitan area. Heidi relies on science, not fad, and delivers the most current and proven concepts to promote optimal health, and improve performance levels – in every day life or athletic competition.

You can find Heidi on Twitter at @heidiskolnik, and on her Facebook pages, Heidi Skolnik and Nutrition Conditioning.

Based on your experiences, what do you look for from producers when being booked as a TV guest?

COMING UP THIS WEEK: Vine turns 1. Find out how to tell a story in .06.

 

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell
Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com. If all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

Read More...

Ready4Air The Week Ahead |Producers Don’t Do This When Booking Guests |Vine Time – A :06 Story?

Arise-On-Screen-Mike-Sargent-Valli-Dawn-Hart-and-Stephanie-R.-Green
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

February 17, 2014 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect, Current Events, Social TV | By

Arise-On-Screen-Mike-Sargent-Valli-Dawn-Hart-and-Stephanie-R.-Green Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Arise-On-Screen-Mike-Sargent-Valli-Dawn-Hart-and-Stephanie-R.-Green
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

We are in week seven of production over at Arise On Screen and we are thinking  about movies  24/7 and trying to predict who will go home with the gold and we don’t mean Olympic gold. With the Academy Awards ceremony only two weeks away, television is gearing up for the big night of Hollywood Oscar festivities on March 2nd.

Which brings me to a very important question. What movies do you think are sure wins and which ones will be a surprise winner?  I’m hoping the sleeper Nebraska with Bruce Dern will win something. Weigh-in below by leaving a comment and tell us your predictions.

We have a busy week coming up on Ready4Air.

Related Post: Ready4Air TV When A Celebrity Is The Invited Guest

Photo Courtesy of Heidi Skonlik

Photo Courtesy of Heidi Skolnik

 

Heidi Skolnik is back with us this week on Ready4Air. Last week Heidi, an expert who appears regularly on television, shared a few tips on what producers can do for any guest who wants to have a professional and successful television appearance.

In her post  Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Do When Booking Me As A Guest,  Skolnik’s explained “ When working with television producers, I have come to learn which moves help make an appearance be the best it can, and which ones you want to avoid. Look for clarity and feedback, and you’ll be please to see all that television producers can do for you.”

This week’s Ready4Air (TV)  Skolnik gives us insight into what producers should avoid doing when booking her. First thing on the list: calling her by the wrong name!  In her post Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Avoid Doing When Booking Me As A Guest, she will tell you the other missteps producers should avoid in order to have her as a guest on their show.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | The Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Do When Booking Me As A Guest

In January the Vine app celebrated their one year anniversary. Vine allows its 40+ million registered users to shoot six second videos that loop continuously and it has really taken off for the millennials (18-24 year old). In the post Vine Time : What Kind Of Story Can You Tell In :06? on Ready4Air (social) I check out the appeal of Vine and the new crop of vineographers who are cashing in on the app’s popularity.

Related Post: Ready4Air: Tips For Surviving The World Of TV and Social Media

Lego Laurie Schacht

Finally, brands need to know that bloggers are happy to work with you and they want you to know a couple of things. Some bloggers complain that brands do not take a strong and clear lead in their outreach campaigns. Whether it is the PR agency, the brand, or the campaign lead blogger information is not clear; deadlines are constantly changing and directions are being lost in translation.

In Ready4Air (Brands & Bloggers)  Brands, Please Let Us Know What You Need In Campaigns we talk to the brands about getting their outreach goals together so that bloggers can deliver the goods. All this and more this week on Ready4Air.

####

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell
Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com. If all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

Read More...

Ready4Air (TV) | The Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Do When Booking Me As A Guest

Photo Courtesy of Heidi Skonlik

February 11, 2014 | Posted in Pros Talk TV And Social Media, Social TV, TV Production | By

Image 15

This year I am asking seasoned television professionals to share their experience on the best way to get Ready4Air.  I can always tell you what I do and believe a producer should do when booking a guest, but I’ve also learned that it never hurts go right to the source.

Our guest poster today is Heidi Skolnik, a nutrition consultant, who has appeared on both local and national television and I’ve actually worked with her back in the day for CBS News The Early Show.

Photo Courtesy of Heidi Skonlik

Photo Courtesy of Heidi Skonlik

By Heidi Skolnik

As a seasoned guest on television talk shows and news programs, I know that guest appearances give great exposure, are great experiences, and can be a lot of work. When working with television producers, I have come to learn which moves help make an appearance be the best it can, and which ones you want to avoid. Look for clarity and feedback, and you’ll be please to see all that television producers can do for you.

Related Post: Ready4Air | Gimme The Mic: Speaking With Authority

The result: a professional, successful segment. And an invitation to return!

Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Do When Booking Me As A Guest

Express enthusiasm about having YOU specifically

Their enthusiasm feeds my enthusiasm. I hope that producers come to me for a specific reason. Understanding what they think I can bring to the table is, of course, flattering, but more importantly, it ensures that I will provide what they’re looking for.

Give clear direction on what their hopes are for segment

I like when producers share their vision for the story, and offer background information about why the segment is happening when it is. As I plan, it is helpful to have specifics in mind. Did a particular story inspire the segment? Is the piece part of a new series? Is the producer hoping my story will target a different audience? Knowing the producer’s clear expectations helps us all be on the same page so the final project is cohesive and successful.

Related Post: Ready Teleprompter Is Tricky Michael Bay: Use These Tips For Next Time

Provide constructive feedback

I like knowing what I can do to improve at any point in the process, but feedback is particularly helpful after the segment is over. Though “job well done” is always nice to hear, I frequently wonder if there was something I should have done differently. Specific comments about my presentation, tone, or talking speed help me adjust my next appearance so the segment is better for everyone.

Coming UP next week from Heidi- Top (3) Things Television Producers Should Avoid Doing When Booking Me As A Guest

Heidi Skolnik, MS, CDN, FACSM, is owner of Nutrition Conditioning, Inc., a nutrition consulting practice that helps individuals, teams, and organizations achieve health and performance goals, serving the greater New York Metropolitan area. Heidi relies on science, not fad, and delivers the most current and proven concepts to promote optimal health, and improve performance levels – in every day life or athletic competition.

You can find Heidi on Twitter at @heidiskolnik, and on her Facebook pages, Heidi Skolnik and Nutrition Conditioning.

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell
Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

 

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com. If all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

Read More...

Ready4Air (TV) | TV Hosting 101: Driving A Segment And Interviewing Guests

Mike Sargent with Valli Dawn Hart & Stephanie R. Green on Arise On-Screen
Photo Credit: Mike Sargent

February 5, 2014 | Posted in Pros Talk TV And Social Media, Social TV, TV Production | By

 

Rene Syler with Arthur Kade Photo Credit Debbie Mitchell

Rene Syler with Arthur Kade
Photo Credit Debbie Mitchell

Most of the time, when someone enters the television industry–whether in front of or behind the camera–they get jobs in smaller markets with the end goal, if desired, to work in the #1 market, New York City. If and when someone gets to New York City, it indicates something about their skills and ability to get the job done.

As a born and bred New Yorker who studied media and graduated college in the Big Apple, I was lucky enough to begin my career in New York City and have spent my entire professional life here. As a result, I’ve had the opportunity to work with the best of the best in the television industry. Journalists like Geraldo Rivera, Bryant Gumbel, Barbara Walters, and Harry Smith are a few I grew up watching on television and eventually had the opportunity to produce and work with later in life. However, with the great opportunities comes the pressure of doing well and the chance to soak up a long list of valuable lessons.

Ready4Air | Gimme The Mic: Speaking With Authority

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell

When it comes to hosting or anchoring a show, the job may appear easy, but it is much harder than it looks. I spent four years as Geraldo’s cohost on his daytime talk show, Geraldo, where I answered one or two questions during the hour, and it was hard. Geraldo, the pro, saved me from a few fumbles and mumbles, reminding me that it’s not easy to walk, talk, and be smart. While some personalities are born naturals in front of the camera, others have to work really hard to look and sound natural.

Related Post: Ready Teleprompter Is Tricky Michael Bay: Use These Tips For Next Time

As a producer, I realized over the years that although each on-air personality I worked with was very different, they all shared a few of the same qualities that made them shine in their jobs. Here is what I’ve observed from those successful personalities over the last 25 years.

TV Hosting 101: Driving A Segment and Interviewing Guests

Do Your Homework

As a television host, you are juggling several different things in your head at once. Names, facts, dates, etc. all in front of your guests, crew and audience so the pressure is on for you to be accurate. It is a producer’s job to keep your information up-to-date and accurate, but most personalities I’ve worked with did additional homework. Bryant Gumbel was known for doing his homework. As a producer on CBS News The Early Show, you researched and wrote at least 10 suggested questions for the segment. Once the interview began, Bryant had come up with different questions. If he used one of your questions during a segment, you were lucky. Harry Smith once told the producers to always find one nugget of information about a guest that no one else has revealed.

Know Your Guests And Elements

Show producers are responsible for gathering research, conducting the guest pre-interview and gathering all the supplemental elements (video, photos, and graphics) that are related to the story. Your producer should know the story inside out. In addition to reading the notes your producer has prepared, talk to the producer. He or she might be able to give you a few valuable tips about dealing with the guest that is not translated in the notes. As a producer on Geraldo, we were responsible for giving him a guest and show overview a few minutes before the show. This is once Geraldo finished reading stage manager Mike Jacobs’s blue card interpretation of our notes. LOL! We were also backstage during the show and could fill-in any important notes. Geraldo was also never one to stay on script. So once a producer put together what you thought was a good flow for the show, he would change it around. I will admit his changes were usually right and made for a more exciting show.

Mike Sargent with Valli Dawn Hart & Stephanie R. Green on Arise On-Screen Photo Credit: Mike Sargent

Mike Sargent with Valli Dawn Hart and Stephanie R. Green on Arise On Screen
Photo Credit: Mike Sargent

Be In The Moment, Listen To Your Guests, And Follow Up

Every host goes into an interview with questions and ideas of what they want to talk about, but it’s important to listen to what your guest is saying. If your guest says something that is amazing, unexpected, or newsworthy, then your job is to follow up. Yes, it will take you off your planned path of prepared questions, but it could lead you down a more exciting road. The only way you will know is if you listen.

Drive The Show Or Segment

As the host of any show, you are in charge of keeping the energy up, your guests engaged, and the conversation flowing.  The guests will follow the host’s lead. The hosting job is a delicate dance where the host, within an allotted timeframe, must make sure the guests have a chance to talk, respond, and introduce their points. If the host does his homework (see above Do Your Homework), then he or she will be successful in driving the key points in the conversation to hit all the important talking points and elements. In some cases, the host might have to gently cut off a guest and keep the conversation moving, all while reading the prompter and paying attention to cues from the show stage manager.

Finally, if things begin to fall apart, just take a minute and breathe, that way the producer in the control room talking to you in your ear can help get you back on track.

####

Coming Up: A Night with Mozzarella Cheese

 

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell
Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

 

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “ Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com. If all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

Read More...

Ready4Air (TV) | Professionals Reveal Lessons Learned In The TV Industry

IMG_1066

January 22, 2014 | Posted in Social TV | By


Framed Television Screen

In my 2013 series “Tell Me…How Did You Get Into Television?”, I received many great responses from readers and found out a lot about my colleagues in the television business. As you must know by now, getting into the television business is only half the battle and the other half is staying, surviving, and thriving in it. I have found that working hard can take you far and you’re never too old to learn lessons.

So when I asked my colleagues “What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during your years in television?” here is what they had to say:

Executive Producer of  The Bill Cunningham Show, Kim Brechka,

Executive Producer of The Bill Cunningham Show, Kim Brechka,

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during your years in television?

“I love television. I love creating television. It may be one of the most difficult jobs in the world in my eyes, but I thrive on the challenges and the drama. I am blessed to have met some of the most amazing and talented friends, colleagues and talent.”

Related Post: How Did You Get Started in Television?

Roger Lee

Roger Lee

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during your years in television?

“I’ve seen the most hard working producers and editors, who do most of the heavy lifting for their respective areas and shows get passed over constantly in favor of incompetent sycophants. The important thing is to not be discouraged by this, work hard and stay above the office politics. Ultimately, a reputation for being diligent will still get you ahead.”

Related Post: How Did You Get Started in Television? 

Framed JoelGrullon

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during your years in television?

“Keep an open mind. Always stay keen to new ideas and different methods to get things done. There are some extremely creative minds that work in television and each has a lesson to teach us and vice versa.”

Related Post: How Did You Get Started in Television? 

Lyndsay Christian, Public Relations Executive

Lyndsay Christian, Public Relations Executive

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during your years in television?

“Develop tough skin. Critics are tough. Accept criticism graciously. Learn from mistakes. Always look at the positives in every situation.”

Related Post: How Did You Get Started in Television?

Patrick Riley

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during your years in television?

“The most important thing I’ve learned during my years in television is that trends and infrastructure will continue to change. I’ve worked hard to stay ahead of that curve.”

Related Post: How Did You Get Started in Television?

Finally it’s my turn.- What’s the most important thing I’ve learned during my years in television?

“Learn as many different skills as possible so you can have some  longevity in the TV game. Change will always occur so never be surprised.  Have a “B” plan because there is an expiration date on this crazy biz”

Coming up soon…how brands can help make a campaign successful through clarity of needs.

####

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “ Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.comIf all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

Read More...