Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | #TBT Stop Wasting Time, Especially When It Comes to Social Media

Photo Credit: Pixabay

September 17, 2015 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect | By

social media management

Let’s face it: social-media management can be a big time suck. It is not an overnight process, but a strategy that is composed of a series of daily, time-consuming steps. Just think about how quickly hours go by when you read through Facebook posts. And that’s just one social-media platform. 
Photo Credit: Pixabay

First published on Entrepreneur.com

On August 17, 2015

Let’s face it: social-media management can be a big time suck. It is not an overnight process, but a strategy that is composed of a series of daily, time-consuming steps. Just think about how quickly hours go by when you read through Facebook posts. And that’s just one social-media platform. As entrepreneurs, we don’t have time to waste.

But it turns out, Americans are wasting a lot of time on things that are beyond their control, including waiting in a doctor’s office and standing in line at the DMV. A report also reveals Americans waste an average of 18 months of their lives sitting in traffic. Yes, sitting in traffic!

In two surveys of 1,000 people each for traffic-intelligence specialist TomTom.com, 88 percent of Americans say they waste valuable time every day — either on purpose or accidentally — and the cost, in dollars and happiness, can make a big impact on their lives. Those surveyed said they estimate that with every hour they waste, they lose anywhere from an average of $54 to $1,296 a day.

The same survey revealed that one in three Americans says they value their time above all else, with 81 percent admitting they are constantly on the lookout for ways to cut corners. With this in mind, I reached out to a few business folks to find out the most efficient ways for anyone including entrepreneurs to cut corners and stop wasting time when it comes to managing social media.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | An Unhappy Customer Uses Social Media To Drive Home A Message To Hertz

Brit McGinnis, a virtual assistant and coach for virtual assistants, explained one tip: “I always go in with a plan. Social media waits for no one, so you better be using your time as effectively as possible. I devote around five hours a day to social media, but it really depends on what my customers need.”

Having a plan and being organized in your daily tasks are definitely good places to start. I include social media in my list of daily tasks.

One survey respondent suggests, “Have a list of at least six things a day to do and do them. Stay off the phone as much as possible. Get up early. If someone does call, make it brief. Don’t stay on the phone all morning and don’t watch television shows that have no meaning.”

Tammy Cho of Encore Alert, a company that identifies a brand’s key mentions and trends in real time, says her team uses two principles to save time. First, Cho encourages business owners to prioritize.

“Rather than responding to every single tweet that comes your way, it’s important to prioritize the five to 10 conversations per day that will make the most impact for your business,” she says. “These might be influencers who are chatting about a topic in your industry, or when many people are using a trending industry hashtag (such as #NYCtech) — essentially a way to reach a lot of people at once.”

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) | #TBT 3 Other Social Media Platforms You Should Consider

While more than half of Americans now use some sort of technology or device to help them save time, the TomTom.com survey revealed that people waste time at least twice a day, with 63 percent lamenting they waste upwards of 40 minutes a day.

The second thing Cho’s team does is automate social media whenever possible.

“Technology exists to empower humans to make the final, smartest decision possible,” she says. “Instead of spending valuable time manually reading through feeds of tweets, posts, and industry content to post, automate this process. Use tools such as Buffer to publish, Feedly to find fresh content relevant to topics you’re interested in, or Encore Alert to identify real-time trends and influencers.”

Remember, autoposting can be helpful for saving time, but pay close attention to your clients and the platforms since each one has its own message, language, and audience.

Finally, if you still find yourself wasting time in any part of your life, try to avoid becoming annoyed, frustrated, stressed or anxious. A few people in the survey claim the key to handling wasted time “is a good attitude.”

How do you save time when using social media? Let us know in the comments section below.

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Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) 2tvchicks: Ahhhh…if only

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell – Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | #TBT What Matters More, The Quality Or Size Of Your Social Media Audience?

social media

June 18, 2015 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect | By

social media

Photo Credit: Jason Howie via Creative Commons

 

First published on Entrepreneur.com

On May 26, 2015

For some brands, massive social media numbers–whether their own or bloggers they are considering for campaigns–take precedence over anything else. This leaves me to ask, when it comes to followers and “likes,” does quantity trump quality?

Social media manager Jason Francis, of Social Media Samurai, says that “Quality trumps all. I know people with 30,000 followers struggling to raise $500 in a GoFundMe campaign, while people with 2,000 to 3,000 followers can move and influence them to the tune of $25,000.”

In an informal poll of social media managers, I asked, “What do you tell clients and brands that worry about the number of social media followers?”

Related Post: Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | #TBT The 3 Things You Need To Know About Hiring A Social Media Manager

Diane Leone, founder and digital media strategist for Butterfly Social, a boutique social media agency that helps companies market their businesses using social media, goes through an evaluation process to identify the top three social media platforms that will work best for clients’ businesses.

“It’s about focusing on one or two of the best platforms for your business and really building quality connections on those platforms,” she says. “If you try to spread yourself thin, whether it’s across all social media platforms or trying to get huge quantities of followers, how will you engage with all of them effectively? I advise clients to go for meaningful engagements.”

Social media strategies are different for each business, but the consensus in the poll was that 80 percent quality and 20 percent quantity is an effective formula.

Social media strategist and business coach Sofia Pacifico, of Increase Your Social Media Reach, says she believes brands should get the quality on top and the quantity that is relevant for the business will follow.

“What I would say is: Do you want engaging and loyal customers coming to your door regularly? Or do you want a business full of people just ‘window shopping’ and actually not interested in your services and leaving empty-handed?” she asks.

The key to quality followers is authenticity in your engagement. The obsession with higher numbers has some brands seeking out “fake followers.” Yes, you can buy followers.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) | #TBT 3 Other Social Media Platforms You Should Consider

Digital Megaphone founder and CEO Hope Bertram promotes authenticity.

“Something I always recommend to brands I work with is to make sure they are working with influencers who are building real audiences,” she says. “The website fakers.statuspeople.com is an amazing resource in checking to see if people’s Twitter followers are real. It drives me bonkers to see ‘influencers’ with fake audiences.”

The end goal should be to have the best of both worlds of quality and quantity, says Jarem Atkinson, a social marketing manager.

“But gone are the days where simply having ‘likes’ makes a Facebook page relevant or credible,” Atkinson says. “Actual engagement is what creates value for any company, brand, or individual on Facebook. And you can only get real engagement and community by having quality followers.”

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Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) Reporter go-to stories for the summer

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Social Media) | #TBT 3 Other Social Media Platforms You Should Consider

Photo credits: (left to right) AdamPrzezdziek, ShelbyyVictoria, and Jose Moutinho

May 28, 2015 | Posted in Social TV | By

 

Photo credits: (left to right) AdamPrzezdziek, ShelbyyVictoria, and Jose Moutinho

Photo credits: (left to right) AdamPrzezdziek, ShelbyyVictoria, and Jose Moutinho via Creative Commons

First published on Entrepreneur.com

On May 4, 2015

In April 2014, the World Wildlife Fund gave the world an inspiring lesson in social media and wildlife conservation by using Snapchat for its #LastSelfie campaign.

The photography app, which allows users to view shared pictures and video for a few seconds before they’re automatically deleted, mimicked the very real disappearance threat that plagues animal populations today. The campaign itself was a call to action for Snapchat’s young audience, but it was also a wake-up call for brands that limit their social media presence to Facebook and Twitter.

According to BusinessInsider.com, Snapchat’s audience is mostly made up of young females in their teens and early 20s, and that audience is one of the hardest to reach. Was the WWF on to something?

Snapchat is not the only platform that is pulling the social rug under the more conventional social media. Tumblr and Instagram are also emerging as millennial-oriented, actionable social spaces in terms of marketing efforts and return on investment. Facebook took a hint and launched Messenger as a standalone app meant to enhance the private messaging experience, and while reviews have been mixed so far, the app is clearly rooted in the need to include money and business in the conversation.

As Caitlin Burns, a business strategist for media companies, puts it, it’s hard to tell which platforms will be the next big thing, but she sees a clear trend of moving away from data-hungry platforms into “public-ish” — more private — communities.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | #Repost 4 Do’s And 4 Don’ts For Businesses Using Social Media

Let’s take a look at what each platform can bring to your brand.

1. Snapchat

A video or picture message on this platform will permanently delete itself after a few seconds, which makes each second invaluable real estate. Brands should view this feature as an advantage rather than a limitation.

Instead of trying to fit messages in such a time-constricted social environment, brands should use the time constriction as an angle to its message. A quick glimpse of an upcoming product, a suspense-filled video or an intimate invitation to meet on another platform are all suggestions that can be cleverly implemented. Remember, the sender decides how long a picture is viewed, from one to 10 seconds, so there are ways to control some of the effect.

2. Tumblr

It’s probably not a coincidence that the company just hired its first chief marketing officer, Stephanie Dolgins. A platform that largely caters to the prized millennials, Tumblr has become known for, among other things, its humorous GIFs, but the possibilities are endless.

With its unlimited post character count and the prominent place that is given to visual content, Tumblr is the platform of choice for many brands, such as Kraft or Sephora, to showcase the culture around their products. Recipes, tutorials and how-tos are some of the angles of a brand’s social storytelling that definitely belong on Tumblr.

3. Instagram

Instagram allows you to show a curated version of your brand. If you look at Taylor Swift on Instagram, she projects this incredible idea of intimacy. She might post about her day, her cappuccino or how she’s decorating her house, but it’s a carefully chosen and aesthetically beautiful version of all of these things.

This is the same way teens and everyone else uses their accounts. You can show stylized images of your product, photos of people engaging with your brand, or other photos that help potential customers feel intimate with your brand.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | Social Media Trends: Moving Beyond Facebook And Twitter

“All of these platforms are different tools you can use to be the voice of your business and to interact directly with your customer base, with the audience you’re trying to reach,” Burns says. “Figuring out the best way to put your business out there in the world requires you to know yourself and understand how to feature your project.”

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Coming up: The startup life may be for you if you have these 5 qualities

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Social) | #Repost 4 Do’s And 4 Don’ts For Businesses Using Social Media

social media

May 13, 2015 | Posted in Social TV | By

social media

First published on Entrepreneur.com

On April 20, 2015

As a business owner, you know the importance of social media as a way to make a connection between your business and customers. Whenever potential clients are looking for a new product or service, they generally start their search on social media, not only to learn more about your brand, but also to see what others are saying about a brand or business.

While more companies are creating social media strategies in their marketing, not every strategy is effective.

If you want to guarantee a more effective strategy, Caitlin Burns, a New York-based business strategist for media companies, has outlined a few social media tactics for brands to definitely use and ones to avoid.

1. Know who you are.

Understand your identity, your brand’s identity, and the voice of who is speaking on any social media platform. You’re the one who knows your product, production, company, or brand best. Being able to communicate that is the first thing I recommend for clients so that on whatever platform they use, people have a sense of who is doing the speaking. The rest of the tactics come down to language and specific things that you might do to turn a phrase on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | #TBT The 3 Things You Need To Know About Hiring A Social Media Manager

2. Don’t wait until after the fact.

You don’t want to find yourself without a sense of what’s coming next, or responding to controversy in a way that doesn’t seem like it’s coming from the same person who created a status update or tweet. You can get in a lot of trouble if you say one very appealing thing, but you can’t replicate it. Another problem is if what you say goes against what you do in the company.

3. Understand your audience.

It’s important to know who you’re targeting. What do they do? When do they live online? With a savvy social media expert, you’ll be able to figure these things out. Understanding your goals will allow you to see how your successes and failures are working; social media allows you to see that faster than any other platform.

4. Don’t make assumptions about your audience.

It is a mistake to think your audience is going to act a certain way just because you think they will. Treat your audience as a subject, not as an object. Your work on social media is a dialogue, a conversation between you and that individual.

Look at how your audience is changing. Learn about them by communicating with your social media team on a regular basis. They are the front line people who can help you understand what’s working and what isn’t–what people are really engaging with and what they couldn’t care less about. This is an opportunity to quickly understand how your brand is being received.

5. Plan ahead.

Unless you yourself are a savvy social media strategist, it’s probably worth the energy and expense to bring in someone who is an expert. You need someone who is immersed in these platforms to help you measure your goals. Whether your team is very experienced or inexperienced in application, a good strategy is going to put you in a great place to execute.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | Social Media Trends: Moving Beyond Facebook And Twitter

6. Don’t assume that your presence on social media means you know everything about it.

Having a personal account is not the same thing as understanding the scope of what Facebook ads and Twitter-promoted posts can do. Because these platforms are refining and changing these specific things all the time, having an expert on call is going to save you a lot of heartache in the future. It helps to have someone whose job it is to stay up to date on what’s going on.

7. Adopt a test and learn methodology.

Start out with your strategist and social media team to test the waters. Put out a variety of concepts to see what is working with your audience and what isn’t. The more you test out an idea and see if that hypothesis is validated by audience data — which you can get very easily from social media platforms — the better feature concept you’re going to be able to build. Learn what works and budget away from the things that don’t.

8. Don’t get comfortable.

You want to make sure that you’re engaging in a creative experiment to communicate with other people. If I’m out with friends every Friday and tell the same story over and over again, I wouldn’t have friends to go out with on Fridays for very long. You want to keep engaging and developing partnerships with relevant communities. They can help you understand the broad strokes of all the things they’re interested in, which will help you keep your brand interesting.

Finally, take a hard look at your social media strategy and make changes and additions where necessary. Always keep in mind that social media can potentially make or break your business. You want to use the strategies that drive people toward you and your business and make them come back for more.

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Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) One last shot to make the Muppets matter

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | #TBT The 3 Things You Need To Know About Hiring A Social Media Manager

sss

April 2, 2015 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect, Social Media Management | By

sss

Social Media by MySign AG is licensed under CC BY 2.0

First published on Entrepreneur.com

On March 2, 2015

Marketing and social media now go hand in hand.

“Social media has been invaluable as we have built our business, and when used correctly, it can be a great help to companies that don’t have marketing budgets,” say Laura Mignott and Sara Walker-Santana, cofounders of five-year-old digital ad agency DigitalFlash. “You can now use social media to follow and learn about potential clients and partners, as well as get loads of useful information about your industry. It can also enable entrepreneurs to tell the story of their company on their own terms.”

When it comes to choosing the best social media platform for networking with clients, I agree with Mignott and Walker-Santana that “Linkedin, Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, and Instagram all help you to learn what people’s expertise and interests are.”

Once you’ve established your social media platforms, it’s important to put the right person in charge of your brand’s social media voice. I strongly advise against using an intern. Instead, choose someone from your business who knows your brand’s message and is willing and able to engage online with clients or future customers. The commitment to handling social media can be time-consuming and for some, a 24/7 job.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | Social Media Trends: Moving Beyond Facebook And Twitter

If you are looking to hire a social media manager, then here are a few things to keep in mind:

1. How much will it cost?

A social media manager’s pricing can vary. The minimum fee depends on the number of platforms you are managing and the number of posts a client is expecting. Social media management can cost anywhere from $500 plus a month, depending on campaigns, contests, and ads being run.

2. Social media outreach takes time.

As a client, do not expect to see results right away. The first step is getting on social media, but realize that it takes time to build a community. Be prepared to devote at least four to six months on your social media strategy to see results. Your audience needs to be engaged with your brand, so be prepared to give them quality content, tips, and news they can use–all information that appeals to your customer base.

3. Ask questions of your social media manager.

Most people may not admit it, but they remain in the dark about the way social media works. Ask your manager to explain how many hours it takes to manage the social media accounts. If the manager can provide a breakdown of the work schedule, it might also help you to see how your money is being spent. At the end of the campaign, or periodically during the campaign, you can ask for an analytics report to measure progress.

Your social media manager has to get it right when sharing your brand’s message. So choosing the right social media manager is important. When I asked a group of social media managers what brands should consider when hiring someone for the job, they said to make sure the candidate has a good understanding of how to analyze data and use all the latest tools and web services, as well as provide samples of their work. As in any situation, references are key.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | #TBT The 4 Necessary Elements of Your Business’ Online Face

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) Greece is a destination for foodies

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Social) | Social Media Trends: Moving Beyond Facebook And Twitter

social media

April 1, 2015 | Posted in Social Media Management | By

social media

 

In April 2014, the World Wildlife Fund gave the world an inspiring lesson in social media and wildlife conservation by using Snapchat for its #LastSelfie campaign. The photography app, which allows users to view shared pictures and video for a few seconds before they’re automatically deleted, mimicked the very real disappearance threat that plagues animal populations today. The campaign itself was a call to action for Snapchat’s young audience to fight mass extinctions, but it was also a wake-up call for brands that limit their social presence to Facebook and Twitter. According to BusinessInsider.com, Snapchat’s audience is mostly made up of young females in their teens and early twenties, and that audience is one of the hardest to reach. Was the WWF on to something?

As Caitlin Burns, business strategist for media companies, puts it, “It’s hard to tell which platforms will be the next big thing,” but she sees a clear trend of moving away from data-hungry platforms into “public-ish” or rather, more private communities.

Snapchat is not the only platform that is pulling the social rug from under the more conventional social media; Tumblr and Instagram are also emerging as millennial-oriented, actionable social spaces in terms of marketing efforts and return on investment. Facebook took a hint and launched Messenger as a stand-alone app meant to enhance the private messaging experience, and while reviews have been mixed so far, the app is clearly rooted in the need to include money and business in the conversation.

Let’s take a look at what each platform can bring to your brand.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | Geraldo On Using Social Media To Level The Playing Field

Snapchat A video or picture message on this platform will permanently delete itself after a few seconds, which makes each second invaluable real-estate. Brands should view this feature as an advantage rather than a limitation. Instead of trying to fit their message in such a time-constricted social environment, they should use the time limit as an angle to their stories. A quick glimpse of an upcoming product, a suspense-filled video, or an intimate invitation to meet on another platform are suggestions that can be cleverly implemented. And remember, the sender decides how long a picture is viewed, from one to ten seconds, so there are ways to control some of the effect.

Tumblr It’s probably not a coincidence that the company just hired its first Chief Marketing Officer, Stephanie Dolgins. A platform that largely caters to the prized millennials, Tumblr has become known, among other things, for its humorous GIFs, but the possibilities are endless. With its unlimited post character count and the prominent place that is given to visual content, Tumblr is the platform of choice for many brands, such as Kraft or Sephora, to showcase the culture around their products. Recipes, tutorials, and how-tos are some of the angles of a brand’s social storytelling that definitely belong on Tumblr.

Instagram Marketers started using Instagram early on, capitalizing on the platform’s exclusively visual appeal. The website’s guidelines for businesses encourages brands to post pictures that follow a certain theme, as this would help them remain consistent and allow them to cultivate a loyal and regular following. But the latest business feature gives motivated brands real edge vis-à-vis their competitors, since they can now pay to target their video viewers based on market segments such as gender or age. And whether a brand is using Instagram for behind-the-scenes shots or avant-garde inspiration, it always pays to jump in the global conversation using the hashtags that their audience uses the most. If #catsofinstagram and #picoftheday are remotely relevant to your pictures, use them. Nothing goes a long way with the audience as much as a brand with a human voice.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) | Breaking News: Social Media: On The Scene

In conclusion, I leave you with these words of wisdom from Caitlin. “All of these platforms are different tools you can use to be the voice of your business and to interact directly with your customer base, with the audience you’re trying to reach. Figuring out the best way to put your business out there in the world requires you to know yourself, it requires you to understand what is going to be the best way to feature your project.”

####

Coming up: Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) 3 things you need to know about hiring a social media manager

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (The Week Ahead) | Brands Looking For Media Buzz | A Producing Mom’s Office Surprise | New Social Media On The Radar

Me playing the "Selfie" game and Toy Insider Laurie Schacht , 2014 The Big Toy Book Sweet Suite - Blogger Bash NYC

March 30, 2015 | Posted in Social TV | By

Deborah Mitchell Brands & Bloggers

Last week, I wrote about television hiatuses and interviewed a few producers about how they spend their work downtime. For the DMMA team, my television hiatus gives us more time to focus on a few of our upcoming projects, including a big blogger conference. If you are a brand that wants to be a part of the buzz, then keep reading!

Me playing the "Selfie" game and Toy Insider Laurie Schacht , 2014 The Big Toy Book Sweet Suite - Blogger Bash NYC

Me playing the “Selfie” game and Toy Insider Laurie Schacht, 2014 The Big Toy Book Sweet Suite – Blogger Bash NYC
Photo credits: Debbie Mitchell

The annual Blogger Bash/Sweet Suite two-day event will take place in July at Chelsea Pier’s Pier Sixty NYC and is being catered by Abigail Kirsch. If your brand is ready to be a part of the social media and TV buzz, we have the perfect sponsorship opportunities for this unforgettable conference. The conference includes a lunch, private after-party, and headliner event for 350 digital influencers. The sponsorship packages–priced between $3,000 to $145,000–feature extensive traditional and social media exposure. Last year in two days, Blogger Bash/Sweet Suite generated 60.3 million Twitter impressions with 6.1 million individual accounts reached. The media alert the week before the event was picked up by 340 media outlets.

This year’s conference is expected to be even bigger. You don’t want your brand to miss out, so contact us here!

Related Post: Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | Blogger Bash And Sweet Suite 2014: Getting The TV Message Across (VIDEO)

2tvchicks

So what do the 2TVChicks love more than their jobs as producers? A good old-fashioned surprise. They write, “I’m not complaining. I love the craziness of my job and my life, but I wasn’t feeling great all weekend, so I was less than a perfect mom and that was bothering me all morning. The day moved along like any other, but then it suddenly took a turn. I ran out to get lunch and when I returned, the best surprise I could have asked for was about to happen.”

This week on Ready4Air (TV), we find out just what the surprise was that turned this producing mom’s day around.

Framed-Social-Media-Logo

When it comes to social media platforms, we know about Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, etc. The social media landscape is changing every day with new platforms on the horizon. A few weeks ago, we spoke with producer and strategist Caitlin Burns, who creates business strategies for media companies, and asked her about the platforms that companies and brands should pay close attention to.

This week in Ready4Air (Social), Caitlin Burns talks about the platforms that are going to make a difference in the way that brands are marketing and reaching their audience and the way people are communicating.

Stay tuned and thanks for stopping by.

Related Post: REPOST | Ready4Air (Social) | Three Ways To Keep Your Social Media New Year’s Resolutions

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) 3 rules for doing a headstand in yoga that help in business

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Social) | Geraldo On Using Social Media To Level The Playing Field

Geraldo Rivera, Journalist

March 18, 2015 | Posted in Social TV | By

The cast of season 7 of The Celebrity Apprentice

The cast of season 7 of The Celebrity Apprentice

When I caught up with journalist and former talk show host Geraldo Rivera a few weeks ago–right before The Celebrity Apprentice finale–we talked about his first foray into reality television and his love of social media. One of the first things I noticed about my old boss, GR, was that during The Celebrity Apprentice airing, Geraldo talked a lot about using social media during his many project challenges. I smiled and was impressed–but not surprised at all–that at almost 72 years old, Geraldo has not only embraced, but also mastered the new digital media tools. Lol!

Anyone who knows or has worked with Geraldo knows just how smart and always ahead of the curve he is. During our interview about his time on The Celebrity Apprentice, I asked him a couple of questions about his experience with social media. GR admits he didn’t embrace it right away. Here is an excerpt from our interview:

Geraldo Rivera, Runner-up NBC's  The Celebrity Apprentice

Geraldo Rivera, runner-up of NBC’s The Celebrity Apprentice

Let’s talk a little bit about social media. You came up with the selfie idea during one of the Celebrity Apprentice challenges, which was great for Cosmo magazine. Tell me how, as someone who grew up communicating the old school way, you use social media in journalism today.

I remember when Fox News came to me and said they would open Facebook and Twitter accounts for me. That was in 2009 or 2010 at the latest, and I turned them down. They even created the accounts, and I had them deleted because I thought they were going to make my life too complicated. But then we came into 2011, and it became clear that I was a day late and a dollar short on that one for sure.

I saw that social media had become a real way to connect with an audience. Because I’m such a controversial person, it gave me a place where I could respond to some of these outrageous charges or slings and arrows. It made me a person who was formidable again because I don’t have my own show. I’m on The O’Reilly Factor every other day and Fox & Friends and Hannity on Wednesday. I also have my specials, but that’s an inappropriate venue for responding to the events of the day, particularly the people who are making personal attacks. But, generally speaking, social media levels the paying field, I’m as powerful now as The New York Times or any gossip columnist. If you make a charge against me, I can come after you with equal vigor and equal visibility, even though I have a relative handful (100,000) of followers on social media.

Even in a big country of 300 million people, if you take someone on with a public issue or in a public way, it gets repeated here and there and that makes the world a much fairer place. Social media really is empowering, and I love it. I don’t see it as a task at all. I choose to see it as a 100,000 of my extended family, some of whom may hate me, but they’re going to hear from me and they’re going to tell their friends who are going to tell their friends. I had a post about the two cops who were assassinated in New York. I happened to be on vacation in Hawaii, but that post went to more than three million people. That’s bigger than the Times or the Wall Street Journal. That’s a lot of folks hearing how I felt about that particular tragedy.

With all the social media options, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc., what is your favorite platform?
I think Twitter is best in terms of sharpening your point. You have to make your point succinct, so that’s my weapon of choice when it comes to making a quick splash. But Facebook is much more thoughtful. You can put together what are essentially columns and have the people read the column. I think that the juxtaposition of the two is very necessary; one is the headline and the other is the body, the reasoning for how you arrived at the headline’s conclusion. I like them both in tandem. I’m not into Instagram and probably won’t go into any of the others unless there’s a technological breakthrough that makes it necessary.
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Thanks, GR!
Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) What it’s like when a show goes on hiatus

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Social) | Podcasting 101 With WeAreLATech’s Espree Devora

Espree Devora

March 4, 2015 | Posted in Social TV | By

Film critic Bobby Rivers with Debbie Mitchell, Executive Producer Arise On Screen Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Film critic Bobby Rivers with Debbie Mitchell, Executive Producer Arise On Screen
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

A couple of weeks ago, friend and film critic Bobby Rivers sent me this email: “Have you ever done a Ready4Air piece on podcast promotion? I have a friend who could use some tips.” Now, I’m not a big follower of podcasts, but Bobby’s question got me thinking. The podcast is a growing medium. I see it firsthand in the culinary world where entries for the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards category continues to grow each year. And I am a semi-regular member of comedian and actress Aisha Tyler’s “army” who supports and listens to her weekly podcast Girl On Guy with Aisha Tyler.

This week I decided it was time to feature a post on the podcast. This one is for you, Bobby Rivers!

In all the social media hype, the podcast is the “buzz” platform of the moment. If you don’t have one, then you either know someone who does, or you have a list of your favorites that you download regularly. So first of all, what, exactly, is a podcast? According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, a podcast is an episodic program (as of music or talk) made available in digital format for automatic download over the Internet. The episodes can be a series of audio, video, digital radio, PDF, or ePub files that you can subscribe to and download through web syndication or streamed online to a computer or mobile device.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Gimme The Mic) | Four Tips On How To Prepare For Your Voiceover Booking

Espree Devora

Espree Devora, WeAreLATech
Photo credit: Espree Devora

In today’s Ready4Air (Social), we chat with Espree Devora of WeAreLATech a.k.a “the Girl who Gets it Done.” The WeAreLATech podcast is number two in the country across all of iTunes’ New and Noteworthy.

Espree, when and what podcasts do you listen to? 

Well, if you’re driving your car, you’re stuck in traffic, and you think life sucks, you find a podcast, which is on-demand audio (although it could be video, too, but I consider podcasts audio), and you listen to it while you’re driving. If the audio is really good, then you want the drive to be long–podcasts are so engaging and great. The Startup podcast is a documentary-style podcast recording the experiences of a guy who doesn’t know how to create a business to having a full-fledged business, and Serial is a murder mystery, also documentary style.

Do you have to pay to listen to the podcast?

No. As far as my experience, podcasts are free. But I do know some broadcasters, after a certain number of episodes, have a pay wall where you have to pay to access those older episodes. But I personally never had to pay for a podcast. You go to iTunes or the podcast app on your phone and there are tons of apps to access a podcast. You just have to find the one you like the best.

Are there commercials in a podcast and is there a time limit?

Good question. Podcasts can be anywhere from a few minutes to four hours. Then there’s my friend Stephanie Burns’ The Top 3 for Entrepreneurs that is five-to-15 minutes. My podcast episodes are from 30-to-60 minutes. Usually, they’re in the 15-minute range. Some of them have commercials. One way a podcast is supported is by sponsors, like the ones that I mentioned, Serial and Startup. They have a commercial sponsor break and they let you know about the sponsor. In my podcast, I have integrating sponsorships, and we converse about the sponsor in the conversation.

If we want to create a podcast, what is the first thing we should do?

The first thing I will tell you to do is to book an interview before you even have a mic. It seems that most people feel stuck like, “Oh my God, no one will say yes to an interview,” but it’s easy for most people to say yes because they don’t have to show up anywhere. It’s very easy access to be able to podcast–it’s a different kind of relationship than a video or TV or anything like that. So book an interview, and from there, decide what kind of mic you want.

What kind of podcast should we produce?

Actually, even before an interview, decide what kind of podcast you want to have. Do you want to have it solo? Do you want guests? And then you want to create the content for the podcast, meaning if it’s solo you create what you want to talk about, or if its interview-based, then book the interview.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Gimme The Mic) | Oops! Three Ways To Recover From A Bad Read

What about equipment? What tools do we need to launch a podcast?

Strangely enough, you will find a bunch of complicated, pricey stuff online. I’ve been in a media company in the past and gone through the hardship of doing everything, so I decided to go with my instinct to build a podcast. And I found tools that are great and affordable, so easy to use, and I don’t understand why the whole world doesn’t know they exist.

First, you start with recording the podcast, and that was an overwhelming process for me. I got a Blue Snowball mic, which you can get at Radio Shack for $30. You can use UberConference, which is an easy way to record a phone call and that can be your podcast episode. In order to move it to my computer, I use a program called Sound Studio by a company called Felt Tip. It’s like iMovie, except easier. Then, you have to host it, which means getting it to the iTunes store. You don’t have to use it–I also use SoundCloud–but I highly suggest that anyone with a podcast host it on iTunes.

There’s also a great podcasting tool called PodClear, which allows you to have great recordings on both sides. You can use it instead of Skype, or you could meet someone in person, which is what I do. Then you’re going to want to edit your audio. I imagine most of you don’t know how to edit audio; if not, you could contact Aria Creative, and edit your audio at an affordable rate. If you want to edit it on your own, I would use Sound Studio because I love it and that’s what I use. I use Aria Creative to have it mastered. You don’t have to do this, but it makes a huge difference.

Once you have the audio mastered, you would upload it to iTunes utilizing Simplecast.fm, which is great because they’re very communicative, and you can email them if you have any problems. Simplecast is easy: They give you step-by-step information on how to get the podcast from your computer into iTunes. It was really an overwhelming process for me to learn before I found Simplecast. And they even give you a free, beautiful-looking webpage that you can easily share with everybody, regardless of whether they have an Android, an iPhone, or a Microsoft phone. Once the podcast is on Simplecast, you want to share it like crazy.

Simplecast.fm is cheap–about $12 per month. A pro Sound Cloud account is about $9 per month. Everything is really low rate.

How important is the microphone?

The microphone is important because you want the quality of your podcast to be excellent. I also have the SnapRecorder from Kickstarter. It’s an at-home portable sound studio, and you can literally put your iPhone in the SnapRecorder box, and it has studio-sound quality. There are all these affordable ways to do this. When you’re first starting, it’s more important to have your podcast going, have great content, and utilize tools that are easily within your access, than to go overboard and not focus on the content at hand.

If we are not ready to have our own podcast, is there another option?

The one thing I would do–and it’s something people don’t think about–is to see if they can get on other people’s podcasts so that by the time those episodes are aired, your podcast is live and people know who you are.  The way LA podcasts got going is that NPR hosted their first episodes. How much bigger can you get? People were exposed to that podcast and it escalated their growth. It’s all about collaboration and other audiences knowing about you.

Espree Devora

Espree Devora, WeAreLATech
Photo credit: Espree Devora

Espree Devora is known as “the Girl who Gets it Done.” She is Comms VP and podcast host at WeAreLATech, a virtual tourist office for LA startups, in addition to being a contributing journalist for TechZulu. The podcast was #2 across all of iTunes’ New and Noteworthy. On her blog, SaveBusinessTime.com, she curates and reviews the best business software for startups to be more productive. She has provided seminars in entrepreneurship and technology to many corporations and universities including CBS, Disney, and USC Executive MBA. Connect with Espree on Twitter @espreedevora or LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/espree.

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Thanks, Espree!

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) 2TVChicks: I Love New York (Even Now)

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air | 5 Tips To Get Active On Twitter And Reach Your Brand’s Audience

Social Media

January 29, 2015 | Posted in Entrepreneur | By

Social Media

First published on Entrepreneur.com

On December 15, 2014

As social media continues to evolve in marketing, brands are constantly feeling the pressure to be more social on all platforms. But which platform is right for you?

Someone once told me this, and now I pass it along to my clients: Think about your online audience in three ways. Facebook is for the people you know, LinkedIn is for the people you need to know, and Twitter is for the people you want to know. With about 232 million “monthly active users,” Twitter is an insanely popular micro-blogging platform with an incredible reach of people you may want to know.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) | Creating Social Media Buzz For Arise On Screen

Here are a few tips on how to increase your Twitter followers and keep your platform alive!

1. Work on your social media voice.
Your brand should have a personality and voice on social media. There is a good chance that your brand is being discussed, hopefully in a good way, online. Every platform has a different audience, so identify that audience and cater your voice and message to them. Try and be a part of real-time conversation.

If you want to hire someone to converse on your behalf, make sure they are familiar with your brand’s message. Hiring an intern to save money is probably not a good idea. It could backfire. While the tone may change depending on the platform, your brand’s message and authenticity should be intact.

2. Make it easy for your audience to find you.
There is no question that people are moving quickly — reading articles and watching videos on their mobile devices while on the run. With this in mind, make it easy for them to share your information. Place share buttons on your company website pages, your blog posts, on your other social platforms and in your email signature. Put the buttons in a place where they are easily accessible.

3. Be proactive.
A good way to increase your followers is to follow people you know by importing your email contacts to Twitter. Make sure that this list is updated with all your recent email contacts and your LinkedIn connections, as well. Once you are following them, you will be surprised at the number of followers you will get!

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) | Breaking News: Social Media: On The Scene

4. Tweet often and increase numbers.
According to a study by Mashable.com, it takes about 10,000 tweets, on average, to break into the 1,000 followers mark. Without compromising the quality of content, make sure you remain a consistent and prolific presence. Even better, join real-time conversations by setting your Twitter time to the peak time your audience is online.

Tap into the moments that matter and that people can relate to and can create a conversation. Your brand may benefit from shared discussions about cultural events, sports, pop culture, news events, etc. Stay grounded in popular demand and trending topics. This can only contribute positively to your social presence.

Be careful and conscious of participating in controversial topics that may put your brand in a spotlight you might not be interested in.

5. Use compatible hashtags.
Your industry has hashtags that are already being used. Join the conversation with relevant content and use them, as well. #ThrowbackThursday, #ShopSmall, #Entrepreneurs are a few good ones. Also, expand your reach by following prominent names in your field, sharing posts or articles, and including them on the tweet along with the hashtag.

Remember, tweets are not just bits of conversation. In mass, they have the power to affect your business. The sooner you join that online conversation, the better!

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Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) Gotham Comes To Albany

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | Build Your Brand By Teaching At A Coworking Space

Victoria Clark, Content Strategist Consultant
Photo Credit: Victoria Clark

January 7, 2015 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect | By

Victoria Clark, Content Strategist Consultant Photo Credit: Victoria Clark

Victoria Clark, Content Strategist Consultant
Photo Credit: Victoria Clark

By Victoria Clark

If you are in the market for a sustainable brand-building opportunity, teaching classes at coworking spaces is a viable option for you. As the membership and event manager for a busy coworking space, I have witnessed many business owners successfully extend their brand, connect with new communities, and grow their client list by adding classes to their marketing strategy. For anyone who wants to energize their brand by becoming a valued resource for ​various coworking communities, keep reading:

Research

There’s no need to waste time and energy pitching classes to a space that isn’t interested. Take your time identifying the spaces that would be a good fit for your brand and classes. Email or call the community managers and/or event coordinators for the coworking spaces on your target list to request information on the submission process, class structure, and members. Compiling this research will determine if you are on the right track or need to revise your target list.

Bonus Tip: Become familiar with the classes offered by various coworking spaces. This is an ideal opportunity to study the professional development areas that aren’t being featured and craft classes that can fulfill that need.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | Creating Your Brand’s Storyline: A Few Tips From TV And Movie Pros

Show Up

A website is a great introduction to many coworking spaces, but that doesn’t compare to an old-fashioned, in-person visit. Many coworking spaces offer a networking night open to nonmembers. Go. Meet the staff and the members. Explore if the energy and vibe fits with your brand, marketing strategy, and goals. Be honest.

Bonus Tip: If you have a colleague or business buddy teaching at a coworking space on your target list, attend the class to gain additional insight.

Make the Pitch

After you’ve completed the research and networked at your targeted coworking spaces, dive in to make your official pitch. Be as creative as you want to by explaining why you want to teach in a space, but make sure to provide the following:

  • A bio highlighting why your brand is a good fit (150-300 words)

  • Suggested class list with brief descriptions

  • Social media links (e.g. website, blog, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter) to provide additional insight into your voice

Related Post: Ready4Air (Brands & Bloggers) | Choosing The Right Bloggers For Campaigns

Bonus Tip: Provide dates/times of your availability that allow for additional discussion, confirmation, and marketing. In my experience, six-to-eight weeks is a good time window to target.

Now, it’s your turn. Let me know if you will be using these tips or have any tips to share in the comments.

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Coming up: The 10 Worst Films of 2014

 

Victoria Clark

Victoria Clark brings specificity, focus, and clarity to social media and content strategy. She has worked with solopreneurs, career transitioners, and creatives to craft their ideas and content to break through the social media clutter in a way that’s authentic and impactful. ​Interested in a Pick My Brain Social Media/Branding Strategy session for 2015? Email me.

 

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

 

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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REPOST | Ready4Air (Social) | Three Ways To Keep Your Social Media New Year’s Resolutions

Framed-Social-Media-Logo

January 1, 2015 | Posted in Social Media Management | By

 

Framed Social Media Logo

One of my resolutions for the new year is to be more socially engaging with folks on my social platforms. I spent a large part of the holidays getting more organized, which is going to be helpful. I’ve found that being organized is key to getting most things done, especially when it comes to social media.

While there are so many different platforms to feed, it’s not mandatory to be on all of them. Choose your top three or four favorite sites, and put yourself on a regular schedule. I highly recommend using the scheduling platforms Hootsuite and Tweetdeck to pre-plan and schedule your posts.

My goal is to “talk” more to people online. I plan to follow back, comment, and interact with more of you who have reached out to me. If one of your goals is to ante up your social media game in 2014, check out a few tips from our returning guest writer, web editor Jessica Williams.

Related Post: Tips For Surviving Television And Social Media

Jessica Williams, Wed Editor

Jessica Williams, Web Editor

By: Jessica Williams

RESOLUTION #1 – To gain more followers on Twitter or “likes” on Facebook, you can do the following 

  • Post content that will entice your audience to engage with you. It’s best to post a question that will allow your following to comment and share their opinions.
  • You can host contests on your Facebook (FB) page that will allow users to enter ONLY after “liking” your page.
  • You can also gain followers and “likes” by sharing content and following new people. It’s all about building relationships. 

RESOLUTION #2 – Become more active on social media

  • If you’re not as active as you would like to be on social media, and that “pesky” day job is getting in the way of your tweeting/FB updates, you can set reminders on your phone to check in with your various networks. Even if it’s something as simple as posting a positive quote or asking your audience to, “Hit RT if you’re happy it’s #HumpDay!”
  •  You can also utilize the weekend to give a recap of all the major pop culture and current events that took place that week. 

RESOLUTION #3 –  Think before you post 

  • I’m sure we’ve all tweeted/ posted something we later regretted. I mean, just ask Justine Sacco (Seriously, what on earth was she thinking?).
  • If you’re ever unsure about what you plan to post, just ask yourself: Is it kind? Is it helpful? Is it necessary? Is it true? If you answer no to any of those questions, then don’t post.

Now that you know my social media resolutions, tell us a little bit about yours. What do you want to do differently when it comes to social media? Leave us a comment or send us a question.

Read more about Jessica on her LinkedIn profile. Click here.

Related Post: Tell Me…How Did You Get Into Social Media?

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Coming Up: Repost | #Foodie Friday: Picture-Perfect Food: Tips On Food Photography 

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | Getting Your Media Kit Up To Speed

Multi-Ethnic Group of People and Brand Concept

October 29, 2014 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect | By

Me playing the "Selfie" game and Toy Insider Laurie Schacht , 2014 The Big Toy Book Sweet Suite - Blogger Bash NYC

Me playing the “Selfie” game and “Toy Insider” Laurie Schacht, 2014 The Big Toy Book Sweet Suite – Blogger Bash NYC.

 

Bloggers, meet the brands; brands meet the bloggers. A healthy relationship between future business partners should always be built on a solid foundation, as I discussed in a previous article published on Entrepreneur.com. But when it comes to bloggers, the first step is a successful introduction, and that part is pivotal in guaranteeing a brand’s interest in what she or he has to offer. It is for that reason that most bloggers open to monetizing their websites or participating in outreach campaigns have a media kit with social media stats prepared in advance.

A media kit one-sheet is far richer in information than an “About” page, and should not be confused with an essay. No poetry needed here!

A simple search for media kits on Pinterest gives you a good idea of how many shapes they can take from the traditional, resume-like page to the elaborate girly design. The kit is also an occasion to show your creativity and your sense of style — and humor. But aesthetics aside, what are the essential elements of a media kit?

Related Post:  5 Things To Do Before Saying ‘I Do’ To A Business Partner

Multi-Ethnic Group of People and Brand Concept

 

Your Photo. If you’re like most bloggers, the majority of the pictures you post are of what you see, not of yourself. Business partners love to see who they will be shaking hands with, so include your favorite headshot in the mix for the brand to see who you are.

Your Bio. Your personal story and the adventures that led you to create your blog are great for your “About” page. Your bio should be a short one-liner, preferably the same one you use on your social media platforms.

The Blog. This is where you put the name of your blog, how long ago you started it, your niche, what you blog about, and who your audience is.

Social media numbers. Include the numbers of your friends and followers on all platforms, as well as information from Facebook Insights or other measuring tools, if available.

Google Analytics. No need to include a whole report; just write down the most relevant numbers.

Your favorite 5. Five brands that is! Name (or use the logo if you have permission) the top brands you have worked with, and with which you’ve had successful campaigns. Not only can this be used as a reference, but it will also give your future partners an idea of how experienced you are.

Related Post: Brands and Bloggers Unite For Internet Week In NYC

Your rates. This is optional. Some bloggers prefer to keep their rates on a separate sheet and don’t disclose prices until a brand has shown serious interest.

Contact information. Your email should be there, but so should all your URLs: website(s) and social media platforms.

And you’re set! Keep it all on one page. Don’t go overboard with the design in order to keep it legible. Now you’re ready for your next blogger outreach campaign!

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Coming Up:  You’re Only As Good As Your Team!

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell – Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (Social Media) | A Photographer Gets Close To The People Before The Lens

Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates
Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage
Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

October 1, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Nick Viagas (center) in Arise On Screen control room Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Nick Viagas (center) in the Arise On Screen control room.
Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

At Arise On Screen, I am the production photographer–a name I made up. Nobody not named “Nick Viagas” has ever called me that. I’m Mike Sargent’s intern, who fell into the lovely job of taking photos of our Saturday tapings for social media. Though I have no experience as a photographer, I have found a couple of tricks that help me take photos I think are pretty cool and really pop out on people’s news feeds.

 

First, I always take photos with people in them. The first week or so, I took photos of just about everything. Looking back on it, I understand that nobody wants to see 20 pictures of a dimly lit, empty hallway. People are more interesting. It’s what the show is about.
Second, I take photos that are as close as possible to the subject. When I volunteered to be the PP, as I call it, Terry Richardson was the only photographer whose name I knew. When I take pictures of the guests backstage, I’m basically doing a second-rate impression of his work and process. I don’t have the expensive camera or the big-time subjects, but what I respond to is the close range of his pictures. It makes the photo feel more intimate, like you’re meeting the subject at a party. I think allowing our guests to do whatever they want without posing them makes for a better picture. Although I can’t always do this in the control room or during taping, I try to have as little negative space as possible in any photo I take for the show. Here’s an example:

 

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) | Creating Social Media Buzz For Arise On Screen

Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage. Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Isn’t that adorable? This came from simply telling Raqiyah and Bobby to do something fun in the green room. Since they are professional entertainers, this is what came out.
Arise On Screen host and film critic Mike Sargent Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen host and film critic Mike Sargent.
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

 

Finally, I try to take a lot of photos in the studio because they always look good. It’s a room made to be looked at through a lens. I always have the “On Screen” logo in the background if we’re in the studio. For all I’ve said about creativity, the most important thing about social media photography is advertising. You’re trying to get people to like your page. If someone looks at that picture on their feed, they are going to know that this is a photo from a TV show called Arise On Screen.
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Thanks, Nick!Coming Up: Ready4Air (TV) | Yes, I’m Networking!: TV Jobs Are Really Hard To Find 

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (Social Media) | Creating Social Media Buzz For Arise On Screen

Michelle Lynne Madar and Briana Montalvo at Arise Tv

September 24, 2014 | Posted in Social Media Management | By

Arise On Screen Production Meeting Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen production meeting.
Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

By Michelle Lynne Madar

My social media job for Arise On Screen usually begins on Wednesdays when I start following the films on Twitter that we will be reviewing that weekend. I follow them, retweet, and favorite anything to do with the film. I also try to post a little tease saying we’re going to review certain movies that weekend. The goal of this is to try and get buzz around our show and perhaps some new viewers. The most exciting part is when the film’s Twitter favorites your post and especially when they start following you.

Occasionally, we have pre-tapes during the week and that’s when we have the chance to start teasing out our special guests. A few weeks ago, we had Emmy award-winning actor Joe Pantoliano, who was on to discuss his latest film The Identical. It’s my job to find out his Twitter handle and any social media related to the film. I also take a lot of photos so that when we’re ready we can Instagram and tweet to tease out their guest appearance.

On Fridays, I start to prepare the long list of tweets that will be going out each hour on the day of the show. Trying to put as much information into 140 characters can be difficult, but it’s always good to have a team to help you phrase things differently so that it fits. I’m thankful for the Arise On Screen interns because they make everything easier come show day.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) |Breaking News: Social Media: On the Scene

Michelle Lynne Madar and Briana Montalvo at Arise Tv

Michelle Lynne Madar and Briana Montalvo at Arise TV. Photo credit: Nick Viagas

Because I’m on the teleprompter during our taping, I don’t have the hands to write down any “tweetable moments.” This is where our fantastic interns come in!

Intern Catherine in Arise On Screen control room listening for "tweetable moments" Photo Credit: Nick Viagas ad Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Intern Catherine in the Arise On Screen control room listening for “tweetable moments.”
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Lance and Catherine’s primary job is to listen for “tweetable moments.” A tweetable moment is anything that would capture the audience’s attention, whether it be a short, insightful review or a quirky, entertaining quote from either the critics or the guest. Even though Nick is taking photos during the show, he still knows to keep an open ear for any good moments.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) “Tell Me…How Did You Get into Social Media?”

Arise Interns Lance and Nick Photo credits: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen interns Lance and Nick.
Photo credits: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

After the show, we all come together and compile a full list of quotes. We decide on the best ones and Debbie reviews and approves them. Then we start to schedule all of our tweets using a site called Hootsuite. Hootsuite allows us to assemble all of our posts on each social media platform. Each post is scheduled for different times throughout the day. Since our show airs on Saturday and Sunday, we post on both days. Once our posts are written, we make sure they all fit within the 140-character limit. When there’s space leftover, we post some of the best photos that Nick took during the taping. Once we are done, we do it all over again for the next weekend!

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Stay Tuned!

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (Social Media) | Breaking News: Social Media: On The Scene

Lyndsay Christian

September 10, 2014 | Posted in Social Media Management | By

Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian

By Lyndsay Christian

In the world of social media, everything happens in a lickety split. News travels fast, which means reporters must be on point. In the wake of a newsworthy “live” moment, what should reporters tweet and post to Facebook and Instagram? What type of video is appropriate? Tag the subject? Post a link to an article? Sometimes it’s overwhelming. Whew!

Think of social media as building blocks to the final product (story/interview). Start with one and continue to add layers. Here are five quick tips to tuck into your back pocket that will help you make the best (and smartest!) social media decisions.

 Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) Three Ways to Keep Your Social Media New Year’s Resolutions

  • As soon as the news breaks, tweet it! Twitter is the quickest way to “break” an exclusive or just to let people know you’re on the scene and in the mix. It’s also a smart way to tease your audience and viewers about what’s to come. Use hashtags wisely, not to exceed three. (Ex: @barackobama just landed in #AirForceOne in the middle of #TimesSquare! Talking to @NYPD now for more details. Stay tuned!)
  • Include a photo with your tweet, if you have time to capture one. Visuals are nice additions–especially in the television medium.
  • As you’re gathering details, update your Facebook status with more information. Ex: President Obama just landed in Times Square (in Air Force One!) Our crew is on the scene now and I’m working on interviews. Definitely a first in the history of unique and daring Air Force One landings! (Add photo, if available)
  • Now, you’ve secured an interview while on the scene! Whip out your mobile device and start capturing video of the interview and the scene (or, ask someone to capture 20 seconds of your interview). It’s important to scan the premises for interesting (and appropriate) footage. Be creative! Upload the video to Instagram or Vine. Tag the interviewee and add the location.
  • You’ve tweeted and posted to Facebook and Instagram. What’s next? A  final, collaborative post to tie the bow on the finished product. When you’re sitting at your desk or reviewing sound bites, jot a few notes down on a notepad. Combine all notes and post the final update to Facebook. Add a link to your outlet’s website to drive viewers to watch your complete interview/news story.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) “Tell Me…How Did You Get into Social Media?” 

Bonus tip: Download HootSuite or an analogous app that allows you post to all social media platforms simultaneously. It does all of the work for you so that you’re not spending time trying to remember passwords and logging on to each individual site.

Happy posting!

Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian is the host of KollideTV’s newsmagazine show On the Scene, which premieres in fall 2014. In this blog post, she offers recommendations to television personalities/reporters on effective social media practices to execute while on the scene.

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Thank you, Lyndsay!
You can follow Lyndsay Christian @LynzChristian
Coming Up: Chef Nadege Fleurimond Is Back & Ready4Air!

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

 

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#TBT Ready4Air |We are Celebrating Over Here… 400 Posts and Counting!

It took me over eleven years to tell my 9/11 story. This post was published on September 17th, 2012.

July 17, 2014 | Posted in Social TV | By

 

Rene Syler and Travis Culberson were featured in Ready4Air's first post

Rene Syler and Travis Culberson were featured in Ready4Air’s first post published on January 18th, 2012. Rene’s support was instrumental in the launch of my blog.

Ready4Air is a labor of love, passion, and commitment to all things media. And it all started with the story I’m sharing with you today for #TBT. With 400 posts in nine categories, Ready4Air features a wide range of topics, some of which are very hard to write – and to remember.

It took me over eleven years to tell my 9/11 story. This post was published on September 17th, 2012.

It took me over eleven years to tell my 9/11 story.  Other topics were much lighter, but still got the attention of a rather large audience. This was particularly the case when People magazine called to inquire about my encounter with Cynthia Jorge, Tom Cruise’s love interest at the time.

Cynthia Jorge, Benjamin Steakhouse, NYC

Cynthia Jorge, Benjamin Steakhouse, NYC

This picture taught me how important it is to label your posts. Turns out Cynthia Jorge became a media “it” girl in 2012 when Tom Cruise took her on a holiday date. The press went crazy and tracked me down to use this photo.  I guess timing is everything!

I hope you will enjoy today’s #TBT as you read about how my adventure started. I would like stop and thank all the contributors who guest posted at Ready4Air, especially those who saw this endeavor as the natural outcome of my amazing career in media: thank you Rene Syler, Lyndsay Christian, Lora Wiley and all those who’ve contributed and continue to keep us Ready4Air!

Happy #TBT!

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It’s A New Dawn, It’s A New Day, It’s A New Life For Me

…and I’m feeling good.”

I LOVE this song.  I listen to Nina Simone’s version of “Feeling Good” every morning but most people recognize Jennifer Hudson’s version from the Weight Watchers commercial. That’s fine too since, it is all about the words.

This month the song has an extra special meaning for me. May marks my 2nd anniversary of leaving my life as a television producer for CBS News. It has been a crazy ride and the last 24 months have been filled with more peaks and valleys, lessons, and personal growth than I could have ever imagined. My departure from the network was sudden and should have been handled better, in my opinion.  But it wasn’t.

My 10 year run was over and I was thrown into a whole new world of communicating.  Communicating in a language of the social & digital media arena that I didn’t understand or need to understand or so I thought.

The first I thing I did in my newly unemployed life was take a break and try to catch up on a decade worth of sleep and restart my yoga practice. Once I was rested and ready to make a career move I tried to go back to what I knew television production.  Yet this time was different.  Ninety nine percent of the time I follow my gut instinct and something was nagging at me.  I felt like it was time for a change, a time to create a life that was manageable where I could still use my talents and have a life.  Television news is a lot of things and manageable is not one of them. Your life is not your own.

I used the down time to re-connect with personal and professional friends, some who helped with my job hunt.  Although I didn’t love the limited job options (start- up talks shows and other morning programs, been there done that) I interviewed anyway.  Alas nothing stuck.

A chance conversation with a former CBS producer, Jessica, who re-connected me to former Early Show anchor turned blogger @goodenufmother, Rene Syler.  Jessica was scheduled to meet Rene for a lesson in social media and I was invited to meet up with them at the Upper West Side Starbucks in April 2011.

Rene remembers that first meeting vividly, “I guess there are two things I remember, Debbie had this look on her face, you know the one when you’re concentrating real hard in an effort to grasp something?  She had that look on her face for a long time. And the other thing was she kept asking, ‘How do you make money?’ LOL . She no longer has either of those things.”

Yes it is true, I asked about money a lot. I had just spent 25 years working in an industry where I worked very hard and was paid very well.  So yes, my mantra was “How do you make money?” Even though Rene couldn’t show me the big money in social media I was intrigued by it.  Once the Starbucks session was over, I tossed my PC, bought an Apple laptop, chatted with Rene 24/7, got a social media tutor @theeventOasis and signed up for a webinar @SMA4women. I was converting and loving it.

In September 2011 I attended the SheStreams conference, my first mom blogger event. It was a social media boot camp for veteran and newbie mom bloggers.  The lineup of speakers and topics were top notch, covering everything from how to shoot better video for your blog to monetizing your twitter.  I was impressed with the power and drive of these women.   Most of the panelists I would have booked for a television segment in a heartbeat.  I went to as many sessions as I could, met moms who were juggling motherhood, working outside the home, traveling to conferences all while producing content for their social media brand.

I later admitted to the ladies that I could not keep up with their energy and enthusiasm. By the end of each day I was exhausted while they were ready to dance the night away! I did have an “AHA” moment at the conference and the mom bloggers @banteringblonde and @mommycosm saw it too. They were the first ones to tell me how my producing skills could have a future in the world of social media.

I have been moving forward ever since.

Me, Ted Rubin, Rene Syler at Blogalicious Conference 2011

Me, Ted Rubin, Rene Syler at Blogalicious Conference 2011

Rene says she knew the moment it all clicked for me. “It happened at that conference (SheStreams) and the days following it. Debbie understood that social media wasn’t a totally different beast than television; it was just it’s younger, faster sibling. In other words, at its core, it’s still about communication only now it’s crowd driven. Debbie needed to understand (as all of traditional media do) that we are all consumers and producers of content; it’s that simple. And that is what is bringing about this monumental shift in media. And Debbie.”

Next stop for me was the #ShiftNYC conference in October hosted by James Andrews (@keyinfluencer) where several of social media’s top creative minds gathered to discuss the future of social media.  While I was there, I kept thinking,  I would have missed  this “new” social media world if I were still working in the “old” world of traditional television.

I have always loved television, watching it, producing it, coming up with the ideas, and following a concept from beginning to end while meeting new and interesting people. However in the last 2 years I learned that it is the producing process I love not the TV medium.

Television is good but it turns out social media is GREAT!  It allows you to be your authentic self,  gives you the chance to reach a much wider audience and it’s growing so fast. I have attended several social media seminars including ones by social media evangelist Sree Sreenivasan( @sree) since September 2011.

I just returned from the Disney Social Media Moms Celebration in Florida, their third annual conference for top influencer mom bloggers and their families. Again this year’s speakers were noted social media personalities including Peter Shankman (HARO), Chris Brogan and AmyJo Martin.

Last year, Rene was one of the speakers and moms say she brought the room to their feet after her presentation.  Disney knows their brand and understands the power of social media. I saw it at this conference and on their social media preview cruise for the Disney Fantasy in March.

A magazine editor asked me recently if I thought social media is a fad that will go away. I laughed and said with certainty “NO”,  it’s here to stay so she had better get on board.

Now, I am completely steering the social media ship. Over the years I have produced several television segments on personal and professional reinvention.  And there is nothing quite like experiencing it first hand. It is not as easy as it looks. I won’t lie to you.  As traditional television journalists, Rene and I talk about how social media has forced us to grow in ways we could never have imagined.

Everyday hasn’t been easy but during those days in the valley she reminded me of two things when it came to reinvention:

#1  Never give up. People don’t succeed because they quit too soon.  If you keep at it, you’ll make it happen.

#2  It has to be your passion. It’s not about making money; the goal needs to be bigger than that, though that’s important (to some) too.  Identify why you do what you do.

Well, I think I have found my “why” and I have the passion.  My transition from traditional television producer to social media producer went to the next level when I co-founded”The Blogger Connection”(TBC), a blogger outreach network.   The network connects a variety of bloggers (fashion, beauty food, travel, and moms) with the brands they love. Over the years I’ve met some great bloggers who I hope to work with again in the future.

UPDATE 10.23.13 — Today, I am putting all my energy into Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, a TV and social media management agency where my team will work and help guide clients in the two worlds that I love.

I want to thank all the folks who are following me on twitter @SocialTVDeb, have friended me on Facebook and linked up with me on LinkedIn!   I promise to always be authentic, interesting and hopefully fun.  I am still a work in progress, but hey aren’t we all!

Here’s a toast to the next chapter. “It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day, it’s a new life for me and I’m feeling good.”…Nina Simone

 

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 Coming Up: A Few Words From Arise On Screen’s Co-host Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi 

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com

 

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Ready4Air (Social) | It’s Personal And Business: The Human Side Of Social Networking

Rhonda M. Smith, Founder of Breast Cancer Partner
Photo Credit: Melanie Acevedo

July 2, 2014 | Posted in Social TV | By

Rhonda Smith with UPS staff at the L.A. Urban League annual gala. Photo credits: Monica Cabbler

Rhonda Smith at L.A. Urban League Annual Gala. Photo credit: Monica Cabbler

By Rhonda Smith

As a recent transplant to Los Angeles, I have attended many networking events in order to get connected and understand how to navigate the business landscape here. I am thankful for meetup.com as it has made navigating the landscape here much easier and far more efficient and cost effective than the old-fashioned way could ever be. Now, I don’t have to just rely on attending Chamber of Commerce events and joining professional associations to meet people and get connected. Meetup.com has enabled me to be strategic in my networking by easily identifying what events to attend and what groups are relevant to get connected to. However, even though there is personal contact made at these networking events I have attended, as a self-employed person, it has taken quite some time to establish myself as a known entity here and monetize my networking efforts.

I have grown weary and exhausted from networking all over town and spewing my elevator pitch to a gazillion people at events I have attended around L.A. over the past year. After thinking about the results of all my efforts, with the exception of one data point, I realized how much traditional networking seems like an endless process. One connection leads to another connection, which leads to another connection and another and so on before real work opportunities arise or anything tangible ever happens.

Related Post: Tell Me…How Did You Get Into Social Media?

688347733_kMZ3j-L

In reflecting on the productivity of traditional networking efforts, what I have found is that it has taken more time and effort to achieve results networking the old-fashioned way compared to some of the amazing connections I have made through social networking. When I stopped to think about this, I realized that I have been able to cultivate great and very productive business and personal relationships via social networking compared to the old-fashioned way. These are all with people, in most cases, who I have never met in person or may not ever do so, but I am still able to experience a strong human connection.

It has been amazing how I have been able to build and cultivate business partnerships and powerful relationships via social networking sites like LinkedIn. Opportunities have happened for me.  One example is a connection and partnership that has grown from connecting with a fellow breast cancer survivor from Australia. Gai Comans reached out to me via LinkedIn late last year and wanted to interview me for a project that she was working on at the time about how to inspire and empower women diagnosed with breast cancer to be more mindful about their health and wellness. Of course, this was right up my alley, and I was eager to speak with her and engage in a conversation about the topic.

photo 3[1]

I think that my connection with Gai is a perfect example of how social networking has made it easier to find like-minded people and establish synergistic relationships more so than in-person networking. I think it is because through social networking you have the opportunity to see/research an individual’s digital footprint and get to know him or her before connecting. You don’t get to really qualify people, so to speak, when attending a networking event. I think that social networking eliminates all the energy we put into “selling ourselves” to others we may meet in a crowded room.

Since my initial connection with Gai, she has interviewed me for a book she’s written called Breast Cancer Survivor Secrets. I will be interviewing her for my Recover, Restore, Re-energize Your Life talk show in the near future. We have supported each other in our efforts to get our various projects off the ground, and we’ve never met each other in person. In spite of that, we have this powerful, personal connection that feels like we have known each other for years and we don’t hesitate to step up to the plate when either one of us needs help or support.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) “Tell Me…How Did You Get into Social Media?”

I also met another fellow survivor, Patricia Brett, who started Veronica Brett Swimwear, a luxury collection of swimwear fashioned especially for breast cancer survivors and women who have had risk-reducing mastectomies. Patricia and I have formed an amazing partnership and friendship since we connected about three years ago. She has supported me in my events by offering up product giveaways and generous gift certificates and, in exchange, I have helped her generate more brand awareness and gain greater access to her target market. Patricia and I have actually met in person since we initially connected online, but I most likely would never have met her without social networking.

More Girls

I have heard the post-millennial generation referred to as the “C” generation because they are connected, they create content, and they collaborate all through a virtual community. I think that this is true, but I think that all of us who leverage social networking as a platform and vehicle to achieve our professional as well as personal objectives could be also be considered as the “C” generation. In this case, it’s not about the definition of an age category of the workforce, but more so the coming of the age of how people in general get work done and drive productivity through technology on a personal level.

Rhonda Smith with Macarena and Jordan

Perhaps there is a strong human element in my connections with Gai and Patricia because we share a common bond being breast cancer survivors. I think I, like many others, wonder sometimes if we as a society are becoming antisocial and if social networking may be dehumanizing us. Well, I think it will if we let it. I think that it is important to remember that while virtual/social networking gives us access to a global universe of connections at our fingertips, it should never be used to replace actual human contact. So, let us never forget that there is a human being on the other side of the connections we make via our laptop, tablet, mobile device, etc. and that social networking is not purely about the quantity of our connections and the community we build, but more so it is about the quality of our connections and the scale of human interactions it allows us to experience, regardless of what generation we are a part of.

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Thanks, Rhonda!

Coming Up: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Gratin Dauphinois

Rhonda M. Smith, Founder of Breast Cancer Partner Photo Credit: Melanie Acevedo

Rhonda M. Smith, Founder of Breast Cancer Partner
Photo Credit: Melanie Acevedo

Rhonda M. Smith is the Founder of Breast Cancer Partner, a for-profit organization that works to empower women diagnosed with breast cancer to become their own health and wellness advocate so that they don’t just survive the disease but “thrive” during treatment, in recovery, and in their life beyond breast cancer. Breast Cancer Partner provides the tools, resources, knowledge, and information to help breast cancer survivors recover from treatment, restore their lives back to “normal”, and re-energize after treatment ends. Breast Cancer Partner also creates and delivers health and wellness education experiences to help survivors optimize their quality of life and well-being during and after treatment, improve outcomes, and enhance their long-term survivorship.

You can find Rhonda anywhere below at  www.breastcancerpartner.com, Twitter:  @BrstCancerPrtnr, Facebook: Breast Cancer Partner or Recover Restore Reenergize Your Life and LinkedIn: Rhonda Smith  

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com

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Ready4Air (Social) Three Ways to Keep Your Social Media New Year’s Resolutions

Framed Social Media Logo

April 3, 2014 | Posted in Social TV | By

 

Framed Social Media Logo

We are one almost one quarter of the way through 2014. Boy, time is flying by! It’s also the time of year when people tend to abandon  their new year’s resolutions. I will admit the past few weeks have been crazy busy on my end  and I haven’t been able to follow through on all my resolutions but my team keeps me focused and on track.  

So how are you doing?  Today I’m re-positing a few tips, from Web Editor Jessica Williams, on ways to keep your social media resolutions.  Read it, take notes and get back on track. Enjoy!

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One of my resolutions for the new year is to be more socially engaging with my folks on my social platforms. I spent a large part of the holidays getting more organized which is going to be more helpful. I’ve found that being organized is key in getting most things done, especially when it comes to social media.

While there are so many different platforms to feed it’s not mandatory to be on all of them. Choose your top 3-4 favorite sites and put yourself on a regular schedule. I highly recommend using the scheduling platforms, Hootsuite and Tweetdeck, to pre-plan and schedule your posts.

My goal is to “talk” more to people online. I plan to follow back, comment and interact with more of you who have reached out to me. If one of your goals is to ante up your social media game in 2014, check out a few tips from our returning guest writer, web editor, Jessica Williams.

Related Post: Tips For Surviving Television and Social Media

Jessica Williams, Wed Editor

By: Jessica Williams

RESOLUTION #1 Gain more followers on Twitter or “likes” on Facebook you can do the following:

  • Post content that will entice your audience to engage with you. It’s best to post a question that will allow your following to  comment and share their opinion.
  • You can host contest on your Facebook (FB) page that will allow users to enter ONLY after “Liking” your page.
  • You can also gain followers and “likes” by sharing content and following new people. It’s all about building relationships.

RESOLUTION #2 Become more active on social media:

  • If you’re not as active as you would like to be on social media and that “pesky” day job is getting in the way of your tweeting/FB updates you can set reminders on your phone to check in with your various networks. Even if it’s something as simple as posting a positive quote or asking your audience to “Hit RT if they’re happy it’s #HumpDay!”
  • You can also utilize the weekend to give a recap of all the major pop culture and current events that took place that week.

RESOLUTION #3: Think before you post

  • I’m sure we’ve all tweeted/ posted something we later regretted I mean just ask Justine Sacco (seriously what on earth was she thinking).
  • If you’re ever unsure about what you plan to post just ask yourself: “is it kind, is it helpful, is it necessary, and is it true”. If the answer is no, the don’t post.

Now that you know my social media resolutions, tell us a little bit about yours. What do you want to do differently when it comes to social media? Leave us a comment or send us a question.

Read more about Jessica on her LinkedIn profile.  Click here.

Related Post: Tell Me…How Did You Get Into Social Media?

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Coming Up: The “real” in reality TV

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell
Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “ Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.comIf all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

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Foodie Friday |2014 James Beard Submissions Are In : Now It’s Up To The Judges

James Beard 14

January 24, 2014 | Posted in Social TV | By

James Beard Broadcast and New Media Committee meeting 2014 Photo Credit: Carolyn O'Neil

James Beard Broadcast and New Media Committee meeting 2014
Photo Credit: Carolyn O’Neil

The James Beard entries are in.

After the  January 9, deadline, committee members gather around and review the entries. Along with myself, the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Committee spend two full days (9-6pm) combing through the entries submitted to ensure all nominations have met the required guidelines for the 2014 James Beard Foundation Awards.

Related Post: The Culinary World Comes Alive For The 2014 James Beard Awards

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

We asked and you delivered.

There were over 200 entries received in (8) categories. That is the most submission entries ever for the Broadcast and New Media category to date. We saw an extraordinary growth in the video webcast category which showed us that good cooks are not only reaching for cooking utensils but are also picking up the camera to show the world what they can do in the kitchen.

Social media has changed every thing including content and how the message is delivered. Now anyone with a camera who loves food or to cook can tell their story. If you didn’t know it then, then you know it know…“This ain’t your Grandma’s kitchen anymore!”

James Beard 3

Emerald Yeh, Chair of our committee, ran a tight ship and kept us focused on the job at hand. We viewed all types of content during the two days that included beautiful photos and video, unique instructional and educational presentations and colorful hosts putting their personal style on their food stories. We saw a trend of cooks returning to the farm. Social media allows cooks and chefs to follow the opportunities, usually working where it’s cheaper to live, and still share their experience with a wide audience.

I don’t listen to the radio a lot but had a chance this week to hear a few interesting radio webcasts with great food content. Of course, when information is being presented on the radio, there is a lot more that can go into the storytelling. With video the constant challenge is keeping your audience’s attention with your words as well as the visual presentation.

Carolyn O'Neil and Ken Rubin Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Carolyn O’Neil and Ken Rubin
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Except for a short lunch break, a few debates about content and a little time with Mr. Bacon, the committee viewed the submissions with eagle eyes.  The viewing takes place in a conference room and this year it was even cozier with the recent snow storm as a backdrop through the windows. Once all the entries are viewed and cleared for submission, we hand them over to our distinguished panel of judges to decide who will be nominated for the 2014  James Beard Award.

Debbie Mitchell and Carolyn O'Neil , NYC 2014 Photo Credit: Carolyn O'Neil

Debbie Mitchell and Carolyn O’Neil , NYC 2014
Photo Credit: Carolyn O’Neil

Of course, the group always finds time for a good meal.  Once we were done we ventured out into the snow to eat, unwind and discuss the day. This year a few out-of-towners couldn’t get home and were stranded an extra day because of the weather. Even more reason to have a good time.

The next time we see each other as a committee will be in the first weekend of May at the awards ceremony. We can’t wait to see who will win this year’s James Beard Award!

Good luck to all you entered!

Related Post: James Beard Foundation 2012 Book, Journalism & Broadcast Awards

Have a great Foodie Friday and stay warm this weekend.

Coming up….Will readers have to pay to receive the news?

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Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “ Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.comIf all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

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Ready4Air (Brands & Bloggers) | Choosing The Right Bloggers For Campaigns

@MelanieMiddle-and-@TVProducerDeb-at-BlogHer-2012-224x300

January 15, 2014 | Posted in Social TV | By

 

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

What goes into choosing the right bloggers for an outreach campaign?

First of all, I think some bloggers work as hard or even harder than a few television producers I know. Remember, a lot of bloggers create daily content (print and video), engage on social media, attend events, and meet deadlines–all while raising a family. In the last three years, I have learned the blogosphere is an influential space that can also be tricky to maneuver. It is a community where friends and groups work together to make things happen–an attribute I greatly admire.

My talent is connecting bloggers to brands for online outreach campaigns. When producing these campaigns, it’s important to choose the right bloggers for the job.

During the holidays, I was asked to match a few bloggers for a New Year’s campaign. Since it was short notice, I immediately checked and posted in a few Facebook groups for bloggers who might be interested. I received quite a few responses. While I was happy to get feedback, I quickly learned that I needed an introduction to many of these bloggers because I didn’t know them personally. As a result, I turned to a few bloggers who I did know or who had impressed me with their professionalism at several events. Real life and virtual life share a few things–references are important.

Related Post: (5) Tips For Creating a Blogger Bio That “Gets” You 

When I use the word right, I am referring to bloggers who not only have a media kit with an exceptional social media presence and numbers, but also they are reliable, professional, and have a good reputation. As a company offering blogger outreach, I rely on the bloggers who I connect with brands to maintain these quality characteristics.

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

How To Become The Right Blogger For An Outreach Campaign

Meet your deadline. 

If you are asked to provide blog posts with links by a certain date, please have the posts with links ready before or on the due date. Preferably before, as this leaves room for edits and adjustments.

Being busy is not an excuse for missing a deadline. 

You are in charge of managing your time and responsibilities. The brand is expecting me to meet a deadline and if you miss your deadline, then the brand could miss theirs. If this happens, they will most likely not call you for a future campaign.

A referral does not guarantee campaign participation. 

Previously, I mentioned the blogger community is very tight-knit and friends will refer friends. However, if a brand chooses you for a campaign and you recommend a fellow blogger, there is no guarantee that your friend will be included in the campaign. It’s never personal; it is business. I, personally, will hold on to the blogger’s information and maybe he or she can be a part of another campaign in the future.

2013 SheStreams Conference, NYC Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

2013 SheStreams Conference, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Veteran bloggers are not the only bloggers.

Everyone has to begin somewhere and while the veteran bloggers have spent years building up their brand and reputation, newbie bloggers should never feel irrelevant. I believe in having a diverse group of campaign participants and will take a chance on the newbie bloggers who have a reputation for being professional and can meet a deadline.

Related Post: Do You Have Conference Curb Appeal?

Bring your authentic voice.

The reason brands are so on board to work with bloggers is because they want you to write authentically about their product or experience and hopefully share it with your friends via social media. People ask me all the time, “How can you trust a blogger who is getting paid to write a post?”

I hope that when a blogger writes, she or he includes the positive and negative in a brand product or service review. If you want to give the brand a chance to respond to the negative, let me know and I can assist you in addressing it. I am always accessible either directly or through my assistant Sang.

I am happy to say that I know several great brands interested in connecting with that right blogger. My job is to find these bloggers and make the introduction. It’s a job I am more than excited to do.

If you are interested in being part of a campaign, we would love to hear from you. So contact me at @SocialTVDeb or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.

Stay tuned! Tomorrow, we discuss the meaning behind YouTube.

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Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “ Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.comIf all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

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Ready4Air (Social) | (3) Ways to Keep Your Social Media New Years Resolutions

2014 New Year Calendar Header1

January 9, 2014 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect, Social TV | By

 

Framed Social Media Logo

One of my resolutions for the new year is to be more socially engaging with my folks on my social platforms. I spent a large part of the holidays getting more organized which is going to be more helpful. I’ve found that being organized is key in getting most things done, especially when it comes to social media.

While there are so many different platforms to feed it’s not mandatory to be on all of them. Choose your top 3-4 favorite sites and put yourself on a regular schedule. I highly recommend using the scheduling platforms, Hootsuite and Tweetdeck, to pre-plan and schedule your posts.

My goal is to “talk” more to people online. I plan to follow back, comment and interact with more of you who have reached out to me. If one of your goals is to ante up your social media game in 2014, check out a few tips from our returning guest writer, web editor, Jessica Williams.

Related Post: Tips For Surviving Television and Social Media

Jessica Williams, Wed Editor

Jessica Williams, Wed Editor

By: Jessica Williams

RESOLUTION #1 Gain more followers on Twitter or “likes” on Facebook you can do the following: 

  • Post content that will entice your audience to engage with you. It’s best to post a question that will allow your following to  comment and share their opinion.
  • You can host contest on your Facebook (FB) page that will allow users to enter ONLY after “Liking” your page.
  • You can also gain followers and “likes” by sharing content and following new people. It’s all about building relationships. 

RESOLUTION #2 Become more active on social media:

  • If you’re not as active as you would like to be on social media and that “pesky” day job is getting in the way of your tweeting/FB updates you can set reminders on your phone to check in with your various networks. Even if it’s something as simple as posting a positive quote or asking your audience to “Hit RT if they’re happy it’s #HumpDay!”
  •  You can also utilize the weekend to give a recap of all the major pop culture and current events that took place that week. 

RESOLUTION #3: Think before you post 

  • I’m sure we’ve all tweeted/ posted something we later regretted I mean just ask Justine Sacco (seriously what on earth was she thinking).
  • If you’re ever unsure about what you plan to post just ask yourself: “is it kind, is it helpful, is it necessary, and is it true”. If the answer is no, the don’t post.

Now that you know my social media resolutions, tell us a little bit about yours. What do you want to do differently when it comes to social media? Leave us a comment or send us a question.

Read more about Jessica on her LinkedIn profile.  Click here.

Related Post: Tell Me…How Did You Get Into Social Media?

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Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “ Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.comIf all else fails, her resourceful assistant, Sang, will find her.

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Ready4Air | “What Does It Take To Get Booked As An Expert On TV?”

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November 21, 2013 | Posted in Social TV, TV Production | By

2012 #TechMunch Food Conference Panel Discussion Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

2012 #TechMunch Food Conference Panel Discussion
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Recently a friend and I were discussing social media and the fact that everyone now thinks they can be  an expert because they have a blog or a large number of Facebook or Twitter followers. While it’s true that followers count for something, it’s false to believe your large quantity of followers makes you an expert.

I’ve been asked time and time again …“What does it take to get booked as an expert on TV?”

Television producers are constantly on the lookout for “new” experts. While we love our tried and true personalities, it’s always exciting to find the “new” great expert.   Producers are inundated daily with pitches from PR people for their clients who are experts in a field. However, most of the time the pitches are off base; we don’t consider the expert. Since producers are under tight deadlines it’s easier to move on and book someone they already know.  As for myself, if I already have a working relationship with the PR person, even with a bad pitch I might take a second look at the expert.

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

What makes someone an expert? 

An expert fills out a segment in several different ways including: delivering additional facts, current information on a topic and in some cases instructional guidance. Academic credentials and affiliations, most likely, will place you in the expert circle. Personally, I believe an abundant number of years in a field is equivalent to speak as an expert.

Jill Brooke

Jill Brooke

When I first met Jill Brooke in 2007, her expertise was divorce. She was the on-air talent for a a three-part series for CBS News “The Early Show.” As a seasoned television personality, Jill already had a history of television and print exposure and she had a wealth of knowledge and contacts on the topic of divorce.  If she couldn’t address a divorce topic herself, she knew who to ask.

Jill sent me an email yesterday describing her evolution into an expert, “Eighteen years ago I was a CNN correspondent and married someone with two kids and a very present ex-wife. Being research oriented, I realized there wasn’t enough data on blended families and decided to make divorce and the unraveling of families, while respecting history and each other, my focus. I also became a stepfamily coach training under the legendary Jeanette Lofas.”

Today, Jill has added a new area of expertise. “I specialize in divorce and now adult bullying with my new book, The Need to Say No: How to Be Bullish and Not Bullied.  Subsequently, I started to look at adult bullying because often divorced parents fight for popularity contests and sadly the weakest and less cash-rich often suffer.”

I asked her why she chose this new expertise and she responded, “I knew right away because so few were reporting on it….and even with my new book, news organizations ranging from CBS to ABC’s “World News Tonight” covered adult bullying because the focus has always been on kids as though adults don’t experience it.”  Jill saw a need,  did her homework and created  a new expertise.

In the  recent blog post “How to Be Perceived as an Expert in Your Field” by Michael Hyatt, he states, “everyone is an expert at something.”  I agree with Hyatt who believes if you Own It, Declare It,  Share it,  Prove It and finally Sell It and you will become the expert of It.

Planning Guest Line-Up For Our Take talk show Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Planning Guest Line-Up For Our Take talk show
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Once you’ve developed your expertise , how do you get on a producer’s booking radar?

Below are my top tips on ways to get noticed by a producer as well as two of Michael Hyatt’s steps, sharing and selling your expertise, that will help producer’s find you.

Google Is Your Friend

As an expert, Google is your friend. Producers google everything including possible experts to interview. They research and read what is being said and written about you.  So share and sell yourself enough to come up in the google search.

Get your name in print

Whether it’s a blog post, newspaper, or magazine we will find it if it’s online. Once we read your name, in print, it increases your value. Oh, and make sure it’s good print.

Get your face on video

Producers want to see video of you to see how you handle yourself on camera.  I urge aspiring TV experts to create your own video, shoot your own interviews and testimonials and put it on your own YouTube channel.  Label it correctly and producers will find you.

Be Ready and Available 24/7

Producers need experts 24/7 so make yourself easy to find and readily available. If you have a website, make sure all your contact information is clearly visible.  If a producer can reach you at 2am to do a segment for 7am in the morning AND you do a good job; you are in and will automatically be put on the go to “expert” list.

Appear on TV

I know this is a tricky one. But yes, if a producer sees you on another show and you do a great job then we will track you down to book you and you become an instant “hot” commodity.  Your ultimate goal as an expert is to get on television. I strongly believe in media training, refining your pitch and and exploring television placement.  All you need is one good appearance and you will get on some producer’s radar.

Finally, I agree with Michael Hyatt who strongly advises against “faking” your expertise. Nothing is worse than getting caught “faking” your expertise during a television interview. With millions of people watching, your credibility, the show’s credibility and the producer’s credibility  is on the line.  “Faking” it is a sure guarantee that you will not be invited back.

To schedule a consultation to get “ON-AIR” ready, head on over here and schedule your appointment today!

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Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “ Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air Listen Up! – We Are Now Giving Radio Listeners Monthly Tips

Framed Radio Microphone

October 29, 2013 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect, Lifestyle Lineup (Food,Fashion,Travel,Books), Social TV | By

 

Chef Amadeus, Radio Host Love Shots Photography

Chef Amadeus, Radio Host
Love Shots Photography

Yesterday I had a great time appearing as a guest on the radio show  “Southern Passion Lounge with Chef Amadeus.”   Amadeus, the 2012 winner of  “Food Network’s Extreme Chef Mexican Showdown” has a lively personality and holds a serious passion for food and cooking. On his radio show he interviews chefs from all around the country; yesterday’s line-up included an interview with Award Winning Professional Chef Robert Mullins from Seattle and yours truly.

When it was my turn, Chef Amadeus and I joked while working through a few technical difficulties on “live” radio. First, I was disconnected and then we heard an echo during the interview. Once we got rolling it was all gravy.  Being a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee, I announced that we are currently taking entries for the 2014 James Beard Awards.  I explained to listeners how to enter and the specific criteria for nominations in each category of Broadcast and New Media.

Related Post: The Culinary World Comes Alive For The James Beard 2014 Awards

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE  JBF AWARDS  ENTRY PROCESS

I also shared a few insider tips on what producers look for when booking a guest chef for a television appearance.  For any guest, sitting for a television interview is one thing, cooking on a show is completely different.  A chef is demonstrating how to cook, give instructions and be personable all in five minutes or less.  Amadeus definitely has the personality for television, but everyone isn’t that lucky. LOL!

Our 45 minute conversation flew by as I discussed ideas on how chefs can create and execute good content when appearing on TV or for their YouTube channel. One very KEY FACTOR is to make certain you have clear audio, nothing is worse than having poor audio for your audience.  And finally, Amadeus and I discussed branding and the importance of chefs building a social media presence when crafting their  brand.  There was so much more to share but we ran out of time. No worries!

I’ve been invited back, once a month, to give tips and news to on how to get Ready4Air.

So, get your questions ready, stay tuned and catch you next month on the radio.

Here is a clip.  My interview is about an hour into  yesterdays edition of  “Southern Passion Lounge with Chef Amadeus” .

Current Food Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with stewburner on BlogTalkRadio

Just a quick reminder , take a minute to vote for Deborah Mitchell Media Associates on Facebook.  If possible please cut and paste the graph below and share with your FB friends on your FB page too!

FB Friends- Can we help my friend Deborah Mitchell by casting a vote for her company?

Thanks in advance for helping.   Here is the link to vote–>>https://www.missionmainstreetgrants.com/search

The company name is Deborah Mitchell Media Associates and the zip code is 10024. Here is the website http://www.deborahmitchellmediaassociates.com/.

It takes a  social media village!

Thanks in advance.

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement, follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air: Tips For Surviving The World Of TV And Social Media

Social Media Logo

October 8, 2013 | Posted in Social Media Management, Social TV | By

Television Series.1

As we all may know by now, getting a job–any job these days–isn’t easy. Television and social media are no exception. Once you get the job, do it well, strive, and figure out how to survive in the industry. This summer, a few friends and colleagues shared their professional journey through the television and social media industry. Each person  left us with a few important tips on how to stay alive and survive on the job. This morning, we take another look at those important words of advice. Get ready to take notes!

Television professionals share their top survival tips for the industry.

Framed JoelGrullon

Joel Grullon – Freelance Audio Engineer 

  • Stay relevant
  • Think ahead
  • Address your weaknesses and get better

Roger Lee

Roger Lee – Producer, Good Morning America
  • Network
  • Keep up to date on all the latest technology
  • Don’t get involved in office politics
Lyndsay Christian Headshot

Lyndsay Christian – Former News Reporter, Freelance On-Air Talent, and PR Maven 

  • Immerse yourself in the news and current events. Read national newspapers: The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and USA Today. Log on to The Huffington Post and watch CNN.

  • Watch playback of your work, critique yourself, and practice. This habit will help you become more confident in delivery.

  • Build a vast network of contacts across all industries–local government, sports, PR, entertainment, etc. You never know when you’ll need to call a contact for an interview. You can successfully accomplish this via social media, too.
  • Develop a ridiculous Rolodex. Old school, yes, but you get the idea. It’s not what you know, but who you know!
Framed Social Media Logo

Social Media Professionals share their top tips for surviving social media.

Framed Jessica Williams
Jessica Williams – Web Editor
  • Spell check
  • Fact check
  • Self-check

Sometimes you have to check yourself and ask if your followers really care if you’re constantly ranting and not projecting positive things. The fact of the matter is most people go on social media to escape their day-to-day drama and seek entertainment. No one wants to scroll through their feed and see misery.

Framed Judith Owingar-2
Judith Owigar – President of Akirachix Association (tech empowerment group for women)
  • Be relevant to yourself and your environment.
  • Be real. Don’t strive to impress the audience of readers or listeners.
  • Don’t be involved in trash talk that destroys another individual.
Framed Headshot of Suncera Johnson

Suncera Johnson – CEO amass digital

  • Be authentic. If you say you do social media, I am expecting to see it in your timeline and I want to see some results. I don’t have to know your name, but I should be able to find your most notable work and some measure of your reach.
  • Practice reciprocity. Don’t ask people to support you if you aren’t willing to support them. If you are like-minded and share similar interests, people are more likely to support your campaigns. If you are relying solely on your family and friends to get out the word about your brand on social media, you have a lot of work to do in finding and developing your audience.
  • Be sociable. Nobody wants to see constant promotion of your product, no matter how good it is, any more than you want to be spammed constantly with their product. Again, know who your audience is and communicate with them without promoting all the time.
  • One of the main things that people should know about social media is that it is designed primarily for people to engage with one another. In my opinion, someone who has an audience of 300 and is actively engaged with the audience is far more effective than someone who has amassed an audience of 3 million and does nothing more than speak TO them, instead of speaking WITH them.

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What words of advice would you give about surviving in your industry?

Photo Credit: Max Shuppert

Photo Credit: Max Shuppert

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA).  She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee.  If you are interested in “ Book Case TV” or are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell@SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.

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