Ready4Air (Music) | #Repost-Summer Music Scene In Eygalières, France

Eygalieres-300x200

June 30, 2015 | Posted in Music | By

Village of Eygalieres
Photo courtesy F. Andrew Abbott

This post was first published on August 8, 2012

The Provencal village of Eygalières may only have a population of 1,800, but certainly it is no slouch on the musical side with a host of offerings each July.

The month kicks off with the Festival de Musique d’Eygalières, four evenings of open-air concerts in a park-like setting. This draws a strong turnout from well beyond the village. Barely, three weeks later the Cinq Nuits des Patios showcases the talents of local artists and musicians. This series combines free concerts in town along with intimate gatherings in private gardens.
Bookended by these two festivals, there is an annual classical music concert in the church, now in its sixth year. The committee’s aim is to make the music accessible for all, so the evening is free. The artists contribute their time and energy to perform at a time of the year when they could just as easily be enjoying themselves on sunny terraces in town.

Crowd assembled for the concert
Photo courtesy F. Andrew Abbott

Based on the attendance alone, it was a success. It is possible, that Christmas services command this level of attendance, but unlikely the case for regular Sunday services. Every pew was filled, the extra chairs were all spoken for, and there were even some young teens perched on the stoop at the base of the altar.

The weather may have contributed to our enjoyment that evening. A mistral wind had been howling consecutively for two days with gusts up to 75 kilometers. The leaves on the platane (plane trees) were so loud it was impossible to think. This north wind is said to drive some people crazy. And it just might, as evidenced by an increase in the number of forest fires set by human hands in this kind of weather.

Julie Scolnik and Olivier Pelmoine

Julie Scolnik and Olivier Pelmoine
Photo courtesy F. Andrew Abbott

It was blissful to be seated inside the village church behind the thick, limestone walls. The wind was rendered silent. The sounds instead were of flute and guitar playing classical, folk melodies of Spain and Argentina.
Julie Scolnik playing her flute

Julie Scolnik playing her flute
Photo courtesy F. Andrew Abbott

Julie Scolnik is an accomplished flutist and the artistic director of Andover Chamber Music, in Massachusetts. She is an American who loves Provence. She and her husband were on holiday in the area a few years ago. They did a little house shopping and fell in love with the first place they were shown. Now, they spend a portion of their summers in Eygalières. She was beautiful in a long purple sundress paired perfectly with her Provencal summer tan. Concertgoers witnessed Julie, ever the consummate practitioner, despite a problematic music stand and minor acoustical challenges. Once the music started and a distracting photographer had left, her pre-concert butterflies were replaced by exotic melodies.
Olivier Pelmoine coaxing the notes from his guitar

Olivier Pelmoine coaxing the notes from his guitar
Photo courtesy F. Andrew Abbott

Her musical partner for the evening, Olivier Pelmoine, had made his way from Dijon. He is adept at coaxing the sensual, romantic Spanish rhythms from his guitar. He is able to play his guitar so masterfully that you almost forget that he only has one instrument. The sounds of drumming and an astonishing range of notes all weaved from a single six-string guitar.

The duo played tangos and intimate melodies for almost 1.5 hours with no break. The audience was totally unaware that the artists had only been able to squeeze in a couple of short practices before the event. Both masters at their chosen instruments, they creatively presented the history of the tango from the early 1900s until the present day.

 

 Are there summer concerts in your town or have you traveled to see a special summer concert ? Please tell us about them?

 

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott  Carolyne Kauser-Abbott has background in the investment business and commercial real estate. An opportunity for change allowed her to start writing and launching travel apps. Like many things in life, it is the unexpected. She has always been a traveler. Her motivation for writing comes from a genuine curiosity, and desire to learn. Some friends encouraged her to start documenting her passions around food, travel and fun discoveries. 

 Fast forward a few years and now you can follow her on her blog Ginger and Nutmeg 

Find her on Facebook, Twitter @gingerandnutmeg, or Pinterest

 

 

 

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | A French Summer Sunday Lunch For 6

Cold Melon Soup with Basil

June 19, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

The countryside in Fanes, Languedoc-Roussillon, FrancePhoto Credit:

A countryside scene in the Languedoc-Roussillon region of France
Photo Credit: Jorge Franganillo via Creative Commons

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

First published on Ginger and Nutmeg

On July 19, 2012

Don’t let your mother tell you that the Internet is a scary place! I have met so many interesting people via Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest that I have decided to start a guest blog so they can share their stories. Voila:

Aidan Larson is an American mom of three navigating her way through life in France and writing about it on her blog, Conjugating Irregular Verbs. She writes from her dining room table in the south of France in between motherhood, French lessons, and perfecting her oeuf en croute. If you want to read more from Aidan, she can be found on her blog or on Twitter @aidan_larson.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | What Is A Far Breton From Brittany, France?

French Summer Sunday Lunch for 6

We are smack dab in the middle of summer. It’s my favorite season of the year, especially here in the south of France where the produce is tantalizingly displayed at weekly markets all over the region. This is the time of year that could make even the most vegaphobic person fall for a green bean, squash flower, or misshapen tomato. Endless possibilities for creating fresh, cool, and perfectly filling summer lunch dishes abound. There really aren’t enough Sunday midis to make all the things I want to make. I jot down notes, tear out recipes, and plan menus while greedily dreaming of long lunches around the table in the dappled sunshine of the terrace.

When I thought of what I’d like to share with you, I picked some of my favorite easy summer dishes and made you a typical French Sunday lunch menu. It’s something you would be served at any southern French maison during the summer, probably outside under a wisteria-laden pergola or rush-covered terrace. It would also make a great pique-nique lunch to enjoy under the shade of a plane tree while you wait for the speeding cyclists of the Tour de France to whiz by.

The French love to serve appetizers and desserts in small shot glasses, called verrines. They make for pretty portions and are fun to dip your small teaspoon into. The soup and white chocolate mousse would be perfect served this way rather than family style. You can fill the glasses ahead of time and keep them refrigerated until ready to serve.

Everything can be made ahead, so it is an easy menu for entertaining. You can, of course, prepare the tomato and crab tart up to the point of cooking and then put it in the oven while the soup is served if you want it to be piping hot. If not, it’s just as good at room temperature or even refrigerator cold–eaten like morning pizza, right out of your hand. (The French would never eat it this way, but what they don’t know won’t hurt them.)

Cold Melon Soup with Basil
Tarte à la Tomate with Crab
Summer Cheese Trio
White Chocolate Mousse with Frozen Raspberries
Chilled Rosé for the grownups and water with mint syrup for the children

 

Cold Melon Soup with Basil

Cold Melon Soup with Basil

Cold Melon Soup with Basil

So simple, so fresh and so summer. A must-try recipe.

Recipe type: Appetizer
Prep time: 15 mins. Cook time: 15 mins. Total time: 30 mins
Serves: 6-8

Ingredients:

1 large Charentais melon or cantaloupe, ripe and perfectly sweet
1 tablespoon lime juice
6 leaves fresh basil, plus extra for garnish
1-2 tablespoons water, as required
1-2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions:

Cut the melon in half. Remove the seeds and peel. Cut into rough chunks and place in a glass blender. Add in the lime juice, basil leaves, and olive oil. Blitz in the blender until smooth. Pour into shot glasses and chill until ready to serve. Crack over some pepper and a small basil leaf to garnish just before serving.

 

Tarte a la Tomate with Crab

Tarte à la Tomate with Crab

Tarte à la Tomate with Crab

An excellent lunchtime dish and one that impresses your guests every time. Serve it with a simply dressed green salad of lettuce leaves, finely sliced scallions, green and white parts, and a tablespoon of drained capers.

Recipe type: Main dish, light lunch. Cuisine: French
Prep time: 15 mins. Cook time: 25 mins. Total time: 40 mins.
Serves: 6-8

Note: Even if you do not like Dijon, do not skip this step. It gives a depth of flavor.
Note: You can prepare the tart and leave in the fridge for up to a half-hour before cooking. Any longer and your crust will get soggy.

Ingredients:

1 large tomato (choose from the tempting market fresh varieties)
1 small red onion, finely sliced lengthwise
1-2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
½ cup Cantal entre deux cheese from the Auvergne region of France or an aged white cheddar
170g (6oz) canned crabmeat in brine
1 large egg, lightly beaten
150ml (3/4 cup) light cream

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 180 degrees C/350 degrees F/GM6.
One prepared savory pastry crust (you can make it if you like, but I don’t bother). Place the pastry in a tart pan, crimping the top edges. Fork the bottom lightly and spread with a tablespoon or more of the Dijon mustard. Thickly grate over a layer of the cheese to cover the mustard. Meanwhile, slice your red onion and gently cook it in olive oil over low heat until just soft but not browned. Drain the canned crab. Layer the softened onion and crab over the grated cheese. Slice your tomatoes into small rounds and place in a circular arrangement over the rest. Beat the egg with the cream and pour over the top. Grate over some more cheese to cover and you’re done. Bake for 25 minutes in the oven.

 

Summer Cheese Trio

Summer Cheese Trio

Summer Cheese Trio

The cheese course is a luncheon staple here in France, but the trick is not to serve too many choices or too much of each. Pick three different cheeses and serve a small wedge of each on a wooden cutting board. Some good ones to try would be a firm, ripe bleu d’Auvergne; a low-fat Tomme de Savoie made from cow’s milk; and a Pélardon, goat’s cheese from our Languedoc region.

 

White Chocolate Mousse

White Chocolate Mousse with Frozen Raspberries

White Chocolate Mousse with Frozen Raspberries

When ready to serve, add a couple of frozen raspberries to the top of each glass. Or you could mix your raspberries in a couple of tablespoons of Grand Marnier if you like before topping each.

Recipe type: Dessert
Prep time: 10 mins. Cook time: 2 hours. Total time: 2 hours 10 mins.
Serves: 6

Ingredients:

180g (7oz) white chocolate
300 ml (1⅓ cup) whipped cream, I use liquid and beat it with the mixer
1 cup frozen raspberries
2 tablespoons Grand Marnier, if desired

Instructions:

Melt chocolate in the microwave or bain-marie (double boiler). Beat the cream with a handheld mixer or similar utensil. Mix the melted chocolate into the whipped cream, folding it gently. Pour into shot glasses or small wine glasses and refrigerate for two hours.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | The Almonds of Provence

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, Creative Writer at Ginger and Nutmeg /Director of Perfectly Provence Photo Credit:

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, Creative Writer at Ginger and Nutmeg/Director of Perfectly Provence
Photo Credit: Andrew Abbott

####

Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) ‘Jurassic World’ And ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ Contribute To Universal Domination

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (The Week Ahead) | Disney/Pixar’s “Inside Out” | Rachel Dolezal Does Not Want To Be White | Does Size Matter In Social Media?

RDolezal120x160

June 15, 2015 | Posted in Social TV | By

InsideOut54f771108303d-691x1024

Disney/Pixar’s Inside Out

 

Happy Monday! I hope you had a great weekend. Mine was filled with fun; I actually felt like a kid again. I went to a screening of the new Disney/Pixar movie Inside Out and was impressed with how smart, unique, and funny it is. The film tells the story of Riley and her emotions–joy, sadness, anger, fear, and disgust–as she grows from birth to 11 years old. We watch as these emotions, stationed at a place called Headquarters in the control center of Riley’s mind, navigate through the various emotional changes in her life, including a big family move.

The emotions–voiced by an array of celebrities including, Joy (Amy Poehler), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling), and Sadness (Phyllis Smith)–were right on point. To top it off, I was joined by former Arise TV coworker Darryl and his 5-year-old son Idris, who always keeps me entertained. Idris giggled out loud throughout the movie, and all I wanted to know was what was on his mind.

If you get a chance, check out Disney/Pixar’s Inside Out. You won’t regret it. The movie opens nationally on June 19.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Film) | Say “Aloha” To This Cast!

RDolezal120x160

Rachel Dolezal
Photo via www.ewu.edu

 

Well, the story of Rachel Dolezal, the white woman passing for an African-American woman, continues to have people scratching their heads. The news story broke last Friday and was all over the news this weekend. So far, Rachel hasn’t explained why she did it and no one has asked her estranged parents why they chose to out her false identity now. I’ve read a few posts this weekend, and some African-American folks are steaming mad at her. Personally, I think folks are really mad that she fooled them with her fake tanned skin and blue eyes. Next to the Caitlyn Jenner story, the Rachel Dolezal story is on my MUST-follow list.

This week on Ready4Air (TV), I explain my take on Rachel’s story in “As A Black Woman, I’m Not Mad At Rachel Dolezal For Passing For Black.”

social media

Photo Credit: Jason Howie via Creative Commons

 

I’m often asked, “When it comes to social media, how can I increase my followers and ‘likes’ and does it really matter?” I did an informal poll of social media managers and asked them what they tell clients and brands that worry about the number of social media followers.

Diane Leone–founder and digital media strategist for Butterfly Social, a boutique social media agency that helps companies market their businesses using social media–says, “It’s about focusing on one or two of the best platforms for your business and really building quality connections on those platforms. If you try to spread yourself thin, whether it’s across all social media platforms or trying to get huge quantities of followers, how will you engage with all of them effectively? I advise clients to go for meaningful engagements.”

This week on Ready4Air (Social), we answer the question “What Matters More, The Quality Or Size Of Your Social Media Audience?”

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | Geraldo On Using Social Media To Level The Playing Field

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, Creative Writer at Ginger and Nutmeg /Director of Perfectly Provence Photo Credit:

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, Creative Writer at Ginger and Nutmeg/Director of Perfectly Provence
Photo Credit: Andrew Abbott

It’s almost summer, and one of our favorite contributors, Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, is visiting us from the South of France. This week, she will share a few of her favorite lunch recipes. Carolyne writes, “I picked some of my favorite easy summer dishes and made you a typical French Sunday lunch menu. It’s something you would be served at any southern French maison during the summer, probably outside under a wisteria-laden pergola or rush-covered terrace. It would also make a great pique-nique lunch to enjoy under the shade of a plane tree while you wait for the speeding cyclists of the Tour de France to whiz by.”

A yummy way to end the week is with a Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) post on “A French Summer Sunday Lunch For 6.”

Stay tuned and thanks for stopping by.

####

Coming up: Ready4Air (Lifestyle) Learning about art history through a makeup tutorial

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Beyond The Stew: Ireland Is A Destination For Foodies

ireland collage

May 15, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

ireland collage

Clockwise from top left: View in the Connemara, Muckross House, Slea Head Dingle Peninsula, and Kylemore Abbey
All photos by Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

 

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

When the sun shines (between rain showers) in Ireland, this destination clearly deserves its moniker “Emerald Isle.” The grass literally sparkles, Irish eyes twinkle, and every available patio chair is taken.

Ireland has long been attractive to golfers, gardeners, and Guinness lovers. Now, it is also a destination for global foodies who have recognized the exceptional blend of the local terroir and creative cuisine. With nine Michelin-starred restaurants in the Republic of Ireland, there is much more to the Irish food scene than traditional stew.

The Irish potato famine struck in the summer of 1845, triggered by a fungus that traveled from Mexico to Ireland. At harvest time, distraught farmers shed tears at the sight of Ireland’s primary food staple rotting in their fields. A planted acre of potatoes would typically feed a family for a year, making the choice of cultivating potatoes over grain an obvious one. These devastating scenes resulted in a human disaster in a country where the population’s diet was highly dependent on the starchy spuds.

It was a dark decade in Irish history. An estimated one million people died, and double that number emigrated to other countries around the world. Even today, it would be difficult to find a family in Ireland untouched in some manner by the potato famine. That may be the reason that the country is only now on the cusp of a food revolution.

“In the last 15 years, small artisanal producers have blossomed, and innovation in the food production sector has increased,” says Margaret Jeffares, founder of Good Food Ireland.

“Local is simply not good enough,” according to Ed Cooney, executive chef at Dublin’s five-star Merrion Hotel where he serves Irish artisanal products such as the hotel’s balsamic apple cider vinegar produced by Llewellyns Orchard.

Michelin-starred chef Ross Lewis, the owner of Chapter One restaurant in Dublin, says there was always a strong agricultural and industrial food scene in the country. However, there was no awareness (or interest) of how to make the best use of these primary products. Lewis feels that all began to change in the 1970s with a handful of pioneering producers.

The math is easy: Good food + great culture = tourists.

In the past few months, I have worked with Mary Baskin at the Vagabond International to develop the itinerary for a unique “Explore Ireland Tour” from September 26–October 3, 2015. The weeklong tour will take you from Dublin to the Wild Atlantic Way (WAW), the spectacular west coast of Ireland. Along the route, you will get a chance to experience some Irish culture, taste local artisanal foods, and enjoy the dazzling scenery.

The Explore Ireland Tour begins and ends in Dublin with the detailed itinerary for the trip available here. Book your trip now as there is limited spoke on this bespoke Explore Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way tour.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Greece: A Destination For Foodies

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, creative writer at Ginger and Nutmeg/Director of Perfectly Provence
Photo Credit: Andrew Abbott

With her camera and laptop nearby, Carolyne is living proof that there is no such thing as a single career anymore. She began her working life as an equity stock trader and then moved to commercial real estate and project management. She has entered the world of freelance writing and social media consulting. In 2010, Carolyne convinced her husband and Labrador that a few months in France would be fun–they stayed for 13 months. Currently, they split time between Southern France and Canmore in the Canadian Rockies. At home or on the road, she writes a food and travel blog, Ginger and Nutmeg. She recently launched a digital magazine focused on Provence called Perfectly Provence and has two travel apps available here

####

Thanks, Carolyne!

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) Was Ben Affleck wrong to ask PBS to keep his family secret?

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (The Week Ahead) | The 68th Festival de Cannes | Asking The Right Interview Questions | Foodies In Ireland

IMG_1581

May 11, 2015 | Posted in Social TV | By

Debbie-and-Mom-at-breakfast-on-Norwegian-Cruise

Debbie and Rita having breakfast at Taste restaurant on Norwegian Epic
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Happy Monday, everybody! I hope that everyone enjoyed their Mother’s Day weekend and that your moms, if they are still with us, enjoyed their special day. Mom and I will have our official celebration at the end of the month when we take a trip back to Jamaica, West Indies. My mom, who was born in Cuba and raised in Jamaica, never asks for anything for any of the holidays. But at 86 years old, she finally asked for something–a trip back home to the islands. Needless to say, we are both looking forward to a nice vacation and spending time together. While it’s great to designate one special day to celebrate moms, every day is really Mother’s Day. So if your mom is still here, tell her that you love her as often as you can since she won’t be here forever.

Related Post: Foodie Friday | Cookin’ And Cruisin’ On The High Seas With The Norwegian Epic

IMG_1581

Arise TV set backdrop at Cannes Film Festival at The Hotel Majestic Barriere Beach
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

I can’t believe it is May 2015 already. Where is the time going?

IMG_1675-1024x768

Arise 360 and Arise On Screen teams arriving to the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, May 2014
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

It’s hard to believe that this time last year, the Arise On Screen and Arise 360 teams were on their way to the South of France to cover the 2014 Festival de Cannes. It was our first time attending the grand film festival. Getting ready for departure from New York was a little hectic, but once we got there the trip was amazing. Our hosts screened movies all day, we taped interviews for the show, and found time to have a little fun in the evenings.

The Cannes Film Festival, which turns 68 this year, begins this week on May 13 and ends on May 24. As always, the goal of the festival, which is for film professionals, is to draw attention to all types of films worldwide and celebrate movies at an international level. While our teams won’t be there in person this year, we’ll definitely be watching and reporting on the festivities through wistful eyes. Here is a look back at our trip to the 2014 Festival de Cannes.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | Arise On Screen In Cannes: Taking The Show On The Road

Lyndsay Christian, FiOS1 News Photo Credit: Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian, FiOS1 News
Photo Credit: Lyndsay Christian

Guest contributor Lyndsay Christian is back this week giving us tips on how to write and ask good interview questions. Questions are the key to a good interview. If you ask Arise On Screen host Mike Sargent about questions, he’ll tell you that I’m a stickler for asking insightful questions that will generate thoughtful answers. Even when you are given a limited amount of time–maybe four to five minutes–there is a way to ask a question in order to get an answer that is filled with important or revealing information.

This week on Ready4Air (TV), reporter Lyndsay Christian has the five tips to writing and asking good interview questions.

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, Creative Writer at Ginger and Nutmeg /Director of Perfectly Provence Photo Credit:

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, creative writer at Ginger and Nutmeg/Director of Perfectly Provence
Photo Credit: Andrew Abbott

And when it comes to being a global foodie, blogger and photographer Carolyne Kauser-Abbott tells us why Ireland is a new destination on the map. Already known for its delicious stews and Guinness, Carolyne has discovered a few other food options on the Emerald Isle. This week on Ready4Air (Culinary Cues), Carolyne shares those options in “Beyond The Stew: Ireland A Destination For Foodies.”

And finally, thanks to all who tuned in online last week for DMMA’s first webinar, Getting Ready4Air: Acing Your Television Interview. I’m told the end result was excellent, but trust me, behind the scenes beforehand–just like a television show–was a little crazy. Thanks to the village (you know who you are) who made it all happen!

Stay tuned and thanks for stopping by.

####

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) Was Ben Affleck wrong to ask PBS to keep his family secret?

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Greece: A Destination For Foodies

Greece collage 2

April 3, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Greece collage 2

Photo credit: Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

 

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Greek prosciutto?

Grilled caper leaves?

Warm fava?

Michelin-starred restaurants?

Nocturnal grapes?

An Athens-based conference was our excuse. The 30-year lapse since my last visit to Greece was long enough for me. I convinced my “first-timer” husband that he might enjoy Greece for its beautiful islands and profound history, but I never thought to sway him with a discussion on the merits of Greek food.

My Montreal-based childhood days were a multicultural potpourri; kids from Caribbean, Greek, and European families shared the halls of my elementary school. Our lunch boxes reflected family backgrounds and the array of global spices, with everything from PB & J on white (mine) to roti, spanakopita, and cabbage rolls (theirs).

However, despite my childhood exposure to considerable food variety, I admit that I was wholly unprepared for the sophistication of the food we encountered in Greece.

The country may be able to thank the European Union (post-Euro debt crisis) for global standardization requirements and competitive market exposure. Those Euro-zone benefits have resulted in entrepreneurial food products and gold medal wines from Greece.

Greece 1 collage

Photo credit: Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

 

Do not fear if you covet a juicy handheld souvlaki dripping through its wax paper envelope; you can find those in ready quantities. However, if your Greek food repertoire ends at baklava and retsina wine, it might be time to consider a visit to the country.

Athens has five Michelin-starred restaurants, countless food tours, and a delicious range of cooking classes. Whether you stay in the capital city or travel beyond to sample escargot from Crete, the unique Santorini tomato, or Protected Designation of Origin pistachios from Aegina Island, quench your thirst with any number of 90+ point wines (Wine Spectator magazine).

For a full A-Z adventure through some of the foods of Greece, you can read the original post on Ginger and Nutmeg: 26 Food Reasons to Travel to Greece.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | The Almonds of Provence

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

With her camera and laptop nearby, Carolyne is living proof that there is no such thing as a single career anymore. She began her working life as an equity stock trader and then moved to commercial real estate and project management. She has entered the world of freelance writing and social media consulting. In 2010, Carolyne convinced her husband and Labrador that a few months in France would be fun–they stayed for 13 months. Currently, they split time between Southern France and Canmore in the Canadian Rockies. At home or on the road, she writes a food and travel blog, Ginger and Nutmeg. She recently launched a digital magazine focused on Provence called Perfectly Provence and has two travel apps available here

####

Thanks, Carolyne!

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) Katie Couric is producing a morning news comedy series

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | The Almonds of Provence

Tian aux

March 6, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Almond tree blossoms

Almond tree blossoms
Photo credit: Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

For most Canadians, the thought of flowering trees in February is absurd. That is not the case in Provence where the almond tree blooms early in the year. The small white or pale-pink flowers typically appear on the trees by February–a welcome sign that spring is nearby.

The almond tree is small; at full maturity it may reach a height of 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 12 inches. The trees typically start bearing after about five years. The almond is technically a fruit, not a nut; it is from the same family as the plum or cherry (Prunus).

Referenced in the Bible, this decidedly old tree has been a part of human nutrition for centuries. Cultivation of these trees closely followed human migration, and as a result, almonds are found in many local cuisines all around the Mediterranean and the Middle East, often featured in sweets and desserts. However, in more modern times, a large majority (45%) of world production comes from California.

Ancient Provencal cuisine was modest fare; the inhabitants made use of local, seasonal ingredients. With the vast quantities and varieties of foods available locally now, the bland diet of yesteryear would be a surprise to most. The climate of Provence is harsh, with chilly winters, dry summers, and a biting mistral wind that forced ancient populations to survive on what they could forage. Maybe the original “100-mile diet” was invented in Provence–sheep, goat-supplied milk and cheese, olives milled for oil, and almonds ground into flour.

This is an easy Provencal dessert that is both gluten-free and delicious!

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | What Is A Far Breton From Brittany, France?

Tian aux

Tian aux fruits
Photo credit: Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Tian aux fruits (Baked Fruit in Almond Crust)

Prep time: 15 mins

Cook time: 30 mins

Total time: 45 mins

Serves: 6-8

A tian is a traditional clay pottery dish from Provence. There are beautiful variations that can be found in local markets, although the traditional variety is made by a few potteries. A glass baking dish (like Pyrex) is a good alternative. Do not use metal. The dessert is really easy and not too sweet. You can make this with any fruit or berry that is in season except strawberries (they are too runny).

Ingredients

1 cup (250g) ground almond flour
3⁄4 cup (175ml) raspberry preserves, or jam of choice
1 large egg
3⁄4 cup (175ml) heavy cream
4-6 apples, Golden are best
1 cup pitted cherries
Pinch ground white pepper
1 whole organic orange, for the zest
2 tablespoons Grand Marnier

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Lightly oil a tian pan or glass baking dish.

Wash, peel, seed, and chop the apples.

Wash, pit, and chop the cherries.

Put the apples and cherry pieces in the baking dish.

In a bowl, combine the almond flour, cream, egg, jam, orange zest, pepper, and Grand Marnier. Mix until well blended.

Pour the almond mixture over the fruit and try to cover evenly.

Bake for 25-30 minutes, until the top is golden brown.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Going Vegan Is A Joy With A Farm-To-Table Menu

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

With her camera and laptop nearby, Carolyne is living proof that there is no such thing as a single career anymore. She began her working life as an equity stock trader and then moved to commercial real estate and project management. She has entered the world of freelance writing and social media consulting. In 2010, Carolyne convinced her husband and Labrador that a few months in France would be fun–they stayed for 13 months. Currently, they split time between Southern France and Canmore in the Canadian Rockies. At home or on the road, she writes a food and travel blog, Ginger and Nutmeg. She recently launched a digital magazine focused on Provence called Perfectly Provence and has two travel apps available here

####

Thanks Carolyne!

Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) Jackson Murphy takes a look at the March box office

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | What Is A Far Breton From Brittany, France?

The dessert Far Breton from the Brittany region of France
Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

January 30, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Desserts from  Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Desserts from Crêpes Cidre et Companie
Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Brittany or Bretagne (French) is in the northwest corner of France, far from Paris and a long distance from the Alps. Brittany is a long way from the olive trees and grape vines of Provence. In many ways, Brittany is far from everything. There is even a department within Brittany called Finistère (translated, this means the end of the earth).

Bretons are a hardy population that has survived off the land and the sea for centuries. Man’s historical footprints in this remote area run deep. The region was sparsely inhabited during the Lower Paleolithic era (2.million years ago), long before five Celtic tribes established territories. Brittany is a place of incredible beauty and a unique cuisine.

If you thought crêpes and galettes (savory crepes made with buckwheat flour) were invented in Paris, think again. These satisfying creations with a cornucopia of potential fillings come from the land of eggs, butter, apples, cider, fish, sea salt, and much more.

We met Delphine, the owner of Crêpes Cidre et Companie, when we rented in Aix en Provence one year. Delphine is a magical blend of Spanish roots and a childhood spent in northwestern France. Her Breton heritage is recreated daily in a tiny kitchen at 23, rue de la Cépède in Aix. Her crêpes and galettes are made to order with love, and generous quantities of ingredients – lots of butter, whole milk, and eggs. You can read more about her crêpes here.

Delphine promotes Brittany and its excellent products from her tiny corner of Provence. We have tasted delicious ciders made with apples, pears, and even chestnuts. We have stocked up on bright tea towels and salted caramel butter. We have never been able to leave Crêpes Cidre et Companie without full tummies and traditional treats from her hearth.

If you are early, there are usually sweet, buttery Madeleine cookies and sometimes, if you are very lucky, a slice of her traditional Far Breton. This dessert from Brittany is a tasty delight somewhere between a flan and a pudding. A Far Breton is similar to a Clafoutis or a Fiadone from Corsica. The key ingredient–much like for perfect crêpe batter–is the flour.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | 6 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Haitian Cuisine

Far is the word for flour in Brittany. With origins as a savory dish made with buckwheat flour, Far Breton was traditionally served with roasts in the 18th century. As tastes changed and refined products became readily available, the recipe evolved into the sweet dessert that is enjoyed today.

 

The dessert Far Breton from the Brittany region of France Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

The dessert Far Breton from the Brittany region of France
Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Far Breton From Brittany
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: French
Prep time: 10 mins
Cook time: 55 mins
Total time: 1 hour 5 mins
Serves: 8-10

The recipe is very simple. It is best to eat Far Breton slightly warm, the day it is made, as it can get a bit dense when it cools. The flan can be made with pitted prunes or apples. Delphine makes hers with prunes, so that is the one that Nutmeg attempted.
Note: In France sucre vanillé is sold in packages. You can make your own with a vanilla bean and white sugar or use one teaspoon of vanilla extract. Not too much as you do not want the batter to change color.

Ingredients:
1 cup white flour
⅔ cup white sugar
1 package (roughly 1 tablespoon) vanilla sugar (sucre vanillé) or extract – see note
4 large eggs
4 cups milk (2%)
½ cup pitted prunes
2 oz dark rum
Instructions:
Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F).
In a small bowl, soak the prunes in the rum.
In a mixing bowl, combine the flour and sugar together.
Add the eggs one at a time and whisk each one well.
Add the vanilla sugar (or extract) and the milk. Make sure to blend together well.
Finally, add the prunes and the rum.
Pour the batter into a buttered pan.
Bake for approximately 55-60 minutes. Check the progress a couple of times during the baking. The center should not jiggle too much.
The flan will rise and then fall after you remove from the oven.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Chef Helen Mirren Fights Over Food In “The Hundred-Foot Journey”

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

 

With her camera and laptop nearby, Carolyne is living proof that there is no such thing as a single career anymore. She began her working life as an equity stock trader and then moved to commercial real estate and project management. She has entered the world of freelance writing and social media consulting.
In 2010, Carolyne convinced her husband and Labrador that a few months in France would be fun–they stayed for 13 months. Currently, they split time between Southern France and Canmore in the Canadian Rockies. At home or on the road, she writes a food and travel blog, Ginger and Nutmeg. She recently launched a digital magazine focused on Provence called Perfectly Provence and has two travel apps available here

####

Coming up: Ready4Air (Social) Must-Have Apps For 2015

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...