Ready4Air (TV) | Lights-Camera-Jackson on Star Power Lights-up FOX Tuesdays

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October 9, 2015 | Posted in Social TV, TV Production | By

 

FOX

Actor John Stamos of “Grandfathered” and Rob Lowe  of “The Grinder”
Photo courtesy – FOX

By Jackson Murphy

ABC has the prestige of Kermit and Miss Piggy kicking-off their Tuesday night lineup. But with mixed reviews of the first few episodes of “The Muppets” (the “Pilot” was loaded with celebrity cameos, adult references and a quirky, off-putting tone) and a 35% viewership drop from Week 1 to Week 2, things aren’t looking so good. And you can’t discount the competition. The two new sitcoms on FOX will definitely give The Muppets a run for their money.

“Grandfathered” marks the TV return of John Stamos, who plays Jimmy, a 50-year-old bachelor and restaurant owner who suddenly finds-out that he is not only a father to Gerald (“Drake & Josh”‘s Josh Peck) but also a grandfather to little Edie. Watching Stamos’ scenes with the baby girl in the “Pilot” did bring me back to his “Full House” Uncle Jesse days, and there’s nothing wrong with that (and having Bob Saget as a restaurant patron at the end of the “Pilot” was also a nice touch.) But beyond this obvious, yet appropriate comparison, the inaugural episode of “Grandfathered” was consistently funny with a high number of great one-liners and some clever moments, including a decent homage to “Kramer vs. Kramer”.

And then there’s “The Grinder”, which features Rob Lowe playing Dean, the star of a fictional TV courtroom drama called “The Grinder”, which just ended its eight-season run. Dean returns to his small-town home to watch the series finale with his family, including brother Stewart (Fred Savage from “The Wonder Years”), who is a real-life lawyer. But Stewart isn’t exactly the most polished attorney and Dean thinks he can use his knowledge from the show to help Stewart help his clients.

“The Grinder” relies heavily on Lowe to carry everything else along, and he absolutely delivers. Lowe is terrific playing a Hollywood actor – charming, confident and playfully over-dramatic in everyday situations and conversations. He’s the reason to watch this show. My one concern going forward is that the weekly storylines may be more of the same: Stewart struggling and Dean assisting by smooth-talking his way through the case.
Hopefully both “Grandfathered” and “The Grinder” provide for breezy, good-hearted entertainment over the course of their seasons (how ever long they will be). And if they both become hits, they may just dims the lights on Kermit & Co.

Related Post- Ready4Air (TV)  Lights-Camera-Jackson: A New “Report” From Stephen Colbert 

Film critic Jackson Murphy of Lights-Camera-Jackson Photo Credit: Jackson Murphy

Film critic Jackson Murphy of Lights-Camera-Jackson
Photo Credit: Jackson Murphy

Jackson Murphy (a.k.a. Lights-Camera-Jackson) has been a film critic/entertainment reporter on TV and radio since the age of 7 1/2. He currently appears weekly on WFLY radio (Albany, NY) and his reviews appear in The Record (Troy, NY) newspaper.

You can find Jackson Murphy anywhere below:

Website: Lights-Camera-Jackson.com

Facebook: Lights Camera Jackson

Twitter: @LCJReviews

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell – Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (TV) | My Life In Television: TV Writer Michelle Jaffe Sherry Pens Her Story

Michelle Jaffe Sherry 
Photo credit: Michelle Jaffe Sherry

February 16, 2015 | Posted in Social TV, TV Production | By

Michelle Sherry Photo credit: is this a selfie?

Michelle Jaffe Sherry
Photo credit: Michelle Jaffe Sherry

This week, we continue Ready4Air’s latest series, “My Life In Television,” where television folks before and behind the camera share a slice of their lives in the TV industry. Today, Michelle Jaffe Sherry–a freelancer–gives a look at the life of a TV writer. Meet Michelle!

What’s your job title today and what are your job responsibilities?

I am a freelancer so my title could change from job to job, but today, I am the writer for Arise and Shine on Arise TV.

As a television writer, explain the top three things to consider when writing copy.

First, so much depends on the type of show you’re writing. I write a lot of talk/information show scripts, and you have to keep in mind the voice of the reader. For example, it’s The Wendy Williams Show not The Michelle Sherry Show. The writing has to jive with her way of speaking. Second, you have to consider the length of the piece or segment. Is it a 30-second promo or an investigative tape package? Third, most times, less is more. An efficient and clever use of words is key.

How is writing for news, talk shows, and radio different?

I’ve never been a news writer, but I think in news you are doling out information. What you’re writing is being read word for word (for the most part), and the information needs to be accurate and clear.

For talk shows each talk show host is different. It depends on their comfort level with reading prompter, ad libbing, etc. Usually, you write intros and outros and then lay out the segment with either bullet points or questions. But the intros and outros are really like a series of teases. The object is to keep the viewer watching.

I produced one radio show, which was a combination of a music countdown and entertainment talk show. You’re mostly coming up with ideas and giving the hosts jumping-off points as opposed to writing actual scripts. But I did write a lot of games and questions for contests and competitions, etc. You want to make sure your hosts have a solid direction of what they’re talking about.

What are the best and hardest parts of your job?

The best part of the job is when you hear an audience respond to what you’ve written. If I write a funny intro, and the audience laughs at it, it’s a real rush! I can only imagine how comedy writers or comedians feel!

The hardest part is keeping it fresh. When you work on a talk show and you do a lot of the same topics, you still have to change it up. Also hard–but kind of fun if you’re crazy like me–are the last-minute changes that happen with live or live-to-tape TV. You have to move fast, and when you get it done, it’s great!

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | My Life In Television: A Senior Producer Juggling Two Shows

What skills does someone need in order to be good at your job?

Obviously, grammar and spelling are key. Plus, for TV, you really have to know how to turn a phrase. It goes back to the efficiency of words–something I don’t think I practiced answering these questions!

Most people think television is glamorous and exciting. What two words would you use to describe the television industry and why?

Manic and gritty! Manic because you’re working and then you’re not. You work 36 hours straight, then you sleep for 4 days. You make lots of money, then nothing. Gritty because it takes resourcefulness and determination to succeed in this crazy business. It’s not for the weak of heart.

Which person taught you the most in your career?

I can’t think of one in particular. I can think of many lessons I’ve learned, good and bad, from people in almost every job I’ve had.

What one ritual or practice keeps you grounded in the competitive television field?

To remember that it’s not life and death. It’s television. The longer I’m in it, the stronger that mantra becomes. It puts the nonsense into perspective and makes me happier and more productive.

If you weren’t working in television, what other job would you have pursued?

I have always been intrigued by the hospitality business–hotel management or something like that.

I have found that hard work is good, but there are few other important tips for survival in any business, but mandatory in the television business. What are your top three tips for survival in the television industry?

Be nice. It really makes a world of difference in the workplace and it’s good for the soul. Plus, people will want to work with you. But also, don’t be so nice that you’re a pushover.

Don’t forget from whence you came. In other words, remember those who helped you out when you were coming up and looking for work or for the next step, etc. You never know when they can help you and it will happen. Goes back to being nice.

Nothing’s fair. This was said to me in my internship at WCBS-TV, and every time I hear someone complain that something’s not fair in the workplace, I think of it. Learn how to fight your battles, which ones to fight, and then walk away–victorious or defeated–with your head held high.

Related Post: Ready4Air | What You Need To Do To Make A Midlife Career Change

What is one piece of advice you want to pass along to someone else who is considering entering the world of television today?

Networking is everything. You can’t be shy. You have nothing to lose by reaching out to people if you do it in the right way. You’ll be disappointed by many, but then someone comes along that gets you through another day. No one likes doing it, but it’s how you get work. Also, read the trades, know the industry and the people in it, and learn from what you read.

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during your years in television?

That like any relationship, your relationship with your career ebbs and flows. You’ll have great runs with great gigs, and more times than not they end, and you have to figure out what’s next. But that can be the most exciting thing ever, if you let it be. I’ve realized that I am extremely versatile and open to new adventures in my career. I have taken many leaps–some successful, some not–but I have no regrets.

Finally, when you are relaxing what do you like to watch on television?

So many things! I am a TV addict. Lots of Bravo, lots of prime time. Also lots of documentaries, biographies, etc. I’m always juggling my DVR to record everything!

Michelle Sherry Photo credit: is this a selfie?

Michelle Jaffe Sherry
Photo credit: Michelle Jaffe Sherry

Michelle Sherry is an Emmy-nominated writer/producer in television who works in news, talk, variety, and on-air promotion. Her career began at WCBS-TV News in New York, after a successful internship in the Channel 2 newsroom. After a short stint in the New York film business, Michelle returned to TV and worked on late night shows, including Saturday Night Live. She also worked on the launches of The Maury Povich Show and The Ricki Lake Show, and spent much of the past two decades in and out of daytime talk. Presently, she is writing for Arise and Shine, a weekend breakfast show on Arise TV. Michelle and her husband, Randy, live in Oakland, New Jersey, with their cute and very hairy dogs, Sydney and Gordon.

Thanks, Michelle!

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) The dramatic conclusion of The Celebrity Apprentice

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (TV) | My Life In Television: A Senior Producer Juggling Two Shows

Jessica Herzberg
Photo Credit: Jessica Herzberg

February 3, 2015 | Posted in TV Production | By

 

Jessica Herzberg Photo Credit: Jessica Herzberg

Jessica Herzberg
Photo Credit: Jessica Herzberg

This month, I am excited to launch Ready4Air’s latest series, “My Life In Television,” where television folk before and behind the camera share a slice of their lives in the TV industry. This morning, Jessica Herzberg–a CBS News The Early Show alum who is now at Fox Business Network–gives a look at the life of a senior producer. Meet Jessica!

 

What’s your job title today? 

I am a senior producer at Fox Business Network. I’m currently immersed in two shows: Making Money with Charles Payne, and Unpacked, a brand-new show we’re in the midst of launching the week of February 9.

What is the best part and the hardest part of your job?

The best part is the gratification of seeing the work I do come to life on TV. I always love seeing the ideas we conceive come together as great segments with cool on-air graphics and having the words I write being spoken by the host or anchor of the show. It just never gets old.

What skills does someone need in order to be good at your job?

I think being creative and a great writer are key, but to be successful in this business, you also have to have a sense of urgency. When you have live deadlines, there is no room for error.

Most people think television is glamorous and exciting. What two words would you use to describe the television industry? Why?

Now that I’m done laughing, I would say fun and grueling. Fun because despite being jaded, I do recognize that there are a lot of aspects to this business that are fun and cool. You get to try new things, and every day is a new day with a new show, so you always get to start with a clean slate. I enjoy and appreciate that. And grueling because this is a business where people work very long hours, including late nights and weekends, and your life can be dictated by what’s going on in the news.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | A Producer Reflects: The Night I Won An Emmy

Which person taught you the most in your career?

I don’t know that I can truly say that there is one person who taught me the most. I have worked on such a variety of shows that I have learned really integral things from a number of people. But among those who I feel really taught me the most are Steve Friedman, Alex Wallace, and Nanci Ross–all from my days at CBS.

What one ritual or practice keeps you grounded in the competitive television field?

Remembering that this isn’t brain surgery or life-and-death. We work in TV. And when I get home, my kids don’t care what I have done all day. They just want to know if I stopped off to pick up the new charger I promised to get or the birthday gift for the party they have tomorrow. That definitely keeps me grounded.

If you weren’t working in television, what other job would you have pursued?

I’m a real estate addict and even have my license, so I would have to say real estate. But part of me has always thought about being a lawyer, and my parents say I argue enough, so that might have been a career choice.

I have found that hard work is good. However, there are other important tips for survival in any business, but mandatory in the television business. What are your top three tips for survival in the television industry?

1) Have thick skin. This is not about you, personally–it’s about the show. You’ve got to let things roll off your back and keep going.

2) Keep smiling. Sometimes work sucks. Don’t complain. Just do the sucky things the same way you do the things you enjoy the most, and people will always want to work with you.

3) Don’t burn bridges. This is a very small, incestuous business, and someone you dislike today could very well be running the show you’re dying to work for tomorrow. Always be nice.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | When Mom’s A Producer : 2TV Chicks, The Pilot…A Guilt Trip!

What is one piece of advice you want to pass along to someone else who is considering entering the world of television today?

You must be willing to start at the very bottom and learn all the seemingly low-level tasks if you want to get ahead. There is no room for entitlement. We have ALL worked the overnights, been the field assistant, and logged tapes. And it has made us all better.

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during your years in television?

There is a way to be firm and not accept subpar work while still being (mostly) nice and letting your staff know you appreciate them. Yelling and screaming are just not productive.

When you are relaxing, what do you like to watch on television?

Either 60 Minutes or Real Sports, or mindless reality TV like the “Housewives” franchise.

What do you plan to do when you leave television?

Sleep :).

 

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Jessica Herzberg is an Emmy-nominated producer who is currently a senior producer at the Fox Business Network. She is with the show Making Money with Charles Payne, which she helped to launch in June 2014. She is in the midst of launching a brand-new show for the network, set to debut the week of February 9, 2015. Jessica has previously launched and run Money with Melissa Francis for FBN, as well as The Five for the Fox News Channel. In her time with Fox, Jessica was also the senior producer for America’s Election Headquarters during the 2008 election, as well as senior producer for Red Eye with Greg Gutfeld. Before her time at Fox, Jessica was a supervising producer for The Nate Berkus Show and spent eight years producing for The Early Show on CBS.

Jessica lives in New York City with her two children, Jake and Zoe. In her spare time, she indulges her real estate addiction (she is also a licensed agent), her obsession with doTERRA essential oils, and naps as often as possible.

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Thanks, Jessica!

Coming up: Ready4Air (Social) Must-Have Apps For 2015

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (The Week Ahead) | A New Year, A New Look | Using A Coworking Space | Lessons Learned In 2014 | James Beard Awards 2015

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January 5, 2015 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect, Culinary Cues, TV Production | By

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Happy New Year to all! Goodbye 2014 and hello 2015!

I hope everyone had a fabulous holiday. The time that I spent unplugged for the holidays was needed and gave me to time to think about a lot of things, including a few new goals for the new year. I admit, I twitched a little in the beginning when I realized that my mom’s house in Florida didn’t have Wi-Fi, so being on the computer was out of the question. But I eventually relaxed and enjoyed having good old conversations with mom and her friends almost every day. Also, I got a chance to finally watch the much-hyped series, Breaking Bad, during their holiday marathon on the AMC network. I like the show, but don’t love it like the critics. In my book, The Sopranos tops Breaking Bad, no question.

Back to 2015. I’ve always been a huge fan of New Year’s Day. The beginning of a new year for me is filled with excitement and so much possibility. It is like a big do-over where I get to refocus and start over. Here at Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, we have a few things in the hopper that we’ll be sharing shortly. We are looking forward to collaborating with more brands and bloggers and sharing entrepreneurial tips on entrepreneur.com, as well as taking your brand’s online look up a notch with a spot-on website.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Brands & Bloggers) | Choosing The Right Bloggers For Campaigns

 Arise On Screen control room Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates


Arise On Screen control room
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Ready4Air (TV and Film) will continue to bring you the best backstage information about the industry before and behind the cameras. On January 4, 2015, my television team celebrated the one-year anniversary of our movie review show, Arise On Screen, hosted by film critic Mike Sargent. The year went by quickly, and the show has grown by leaps and bounds. The goal for our program this year is to tweak the 30-minute show to keep it interesting and entertaining for moviegoers and viewers alike in the new year. Stay tuned and watch as we make a few changes. See if you can spot them when you tune on Saturdays at 5:00 p.m. or online on our YouTube channel.

DMMA is also busy incorporating social media into television programming. One of the highlights of the end of last year was our social media management project for a newly-launched nationally syndicated court show. Court shows have been around a for a while, but this new show had a young, no-nonsense judge on the bench. Based on our social media postings, the audience seemed to like her fresh approach. Social media management and TV will continue to be on our calendar of projects in 2015, so stay tuned.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | It’s Personal And Business: The Human Side Of Social Networking

Victoria Clark, Content Strategist Consultant Photo Credit: Victoria Clark

Victoria Clark, Content Strategist Consultant
Photo Credit: Victoria Clark

In the first week of 2015, we welcome back guest contributor Victoria Clark, a content strategist consultant who helps entrepreneurs in several different ways. In her first interview with Ready4Air, she explained that part of her job is to empower and connect people using social media. This week in Ready4Air (Brands And Bloggers), she pens a post entitled “Build Your Brand By Teaching At A Coworking Space.” Victoria, who is working as a membership and event manager for a coworking space, sees firsthand how business owners have successfully expanded their brand by adding classes at coworking communities to their marketing strategy. If you want to jump-start your brand or blogging in 2015, then check out this week’s post.

2014 Savor The Succcess Event, NYC. Photo Credit: Patrice Waite/ Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

2014 Savor the Success Event, NYC.
Photo Credit: Patrice Waite/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

As for our team at Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, we’ve made a few changes during the year. Nay Ayache is still on board heading up the company’s website development, and copy editor Alexis Trass Walker joined us last fall, working to make sure that all our i’s are dotted and t’s are crossed–literally. I continue to share weekly online posts with entrepreneurs via entrepreneur.com. This week, I reveal on Ready4Air (Brands And Bloggers) “The Biggest Lessons I Learned Working Solo In 2014.” While running a business without a partner has its benefits, it can be challenging at times. During the last year, I’ve picked up a few tips to make the job of a solopreneur a little easier.

James Beard Portrait at James Beard House NYC Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

James Beard Portrait at James Beard House NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

And finally, Friday, January 9 is the last day to submit nominations for the 2015 James Beard Awards for Broadcast and New Media. For the first time ever, the main awards ceremony will leave New York during the first weekend in May and be held in Chicago. However, the Book, Broadcast & Journalism Awards Dinner will remain in New York City. The entry deadline for  the 2015 James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards is this Friday at 11:59 p.m. EST. If you have or know of a radio, podcast, webcast, or television broadcast covering the topic of food and beverage that originally aired in North America in 2014, then click here to read more about the JBF Awards submission criteria.

We are looking forward to meeting and, hopefully, working with many of you in the new year. Thank you for your continued support!

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Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

 

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen, a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement, follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (The Week Ahead) | A Scene From Jurassic Park | Meeting A Show Line Producer | Tips For A Career Change In Midlife

Thanksgiving Holiday 2014, Dominican Republic
Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell /Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

December 8, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Thanksgiving Holiday 2014, Dominican Republic Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell /Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Thanksgiving Holiday 2014, Dominican Republic
Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell /Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Well, my beautiful holiday came to a screeching halt last week when my plane landed at JFK airport, and instead of heading home, I went straight to the office. With luggage in tow and sand in my flip flops, I got there last Tuesday night at about 7:15 p.m. to work on the script for last Saturday’s episode of Arise On Screen. Tuesday night is what I call “date night” with Steven Ramey, the show’s line producer. We usually spend a couple of hours refining the script and creating the show rundown. Could I have gone home from the airport and worked on it the next day? Yes, but that means we would have been behind schedule and scrambling a little bit to catch up. For me, it was worth it to go into the office and just get everything together as usual.

All this is to say, my re-entry into the work grind was quick, but I’m still glowing from my few days in the Dominican Republic. Speaking of DR, I was excited to meet fellow producer Tracey Cuesta, the mastermind behind Dominican Republic Production Support Services in La Romana.

La Romana/ Casa de Campo, Dominican Republic Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell /Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

La Romana/Casa de Campo, Dominican Republic
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell /Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Tracey–a seasoned producer who spent several years working in Los Angeles–is from the Dominican Republic and moved back there over a decade ago. Now, she coordinates amazing shoots and events on the island. While I was there, Tracey took me on a tour of a few beautiful locations located in La Romana/Casa de Campo, which included the famous one above that was featured in the 1993 film Jurassic Park.

I’ve invited Tracey to guest post for Ready4Air and share her insights on making the most of an international shoot. Hopefully, she’ll join us on our weekly production blogging adventure.

Ready4Air (Brands And Bloggers) | A Hotel Bumps It Up A Notch: From Grand To Luxurious (VIDEO)

Executive Producer Debbie Mitchell and Line Producer Steven Ramey in Arise On Screen control room Photo Credit: Nick Vargas/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Executive Producer Debbie Mitchell and Line Producer Steven Ramey in Arise On Screen control room
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Earlier in this post, I mentioned Arise On Screen line producer Steven Ramey, who I’ve worked with on this job for almost a year. Steven and I go way back to our years at CBS News The Early Show. Back then, we worked on the same show but on different shifts and rarely saw each other. Now, we work side by side as a team to bring Arise On Screen to life each weekend. As the show’s line producer, we’ve worked many late nights at the office, traveled internationally to the Cannes Film Festival, and put out fires in the control room when the control gremlins surface. But what, exactly, does a line producer do?

This week on Ready4Air, I will introduce you to Steven Ramey, who will tell us exactly what a line producer does on a television show.

2014 Savor The Succcess Event, NYC. Photo Credit: Patrice Waite/ Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

2014 Savor The Succcess Event, NYC.
Photo Credit: Patrice Waite/ Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

And finally, if you are regular readers of this site, you may be familiar with my career reinvention story. If you are new to the site, you can click on the link below and read about it. I was forced to reinvent my professional life during midlife. It’s a journey I did not plan on but had to rise to the occasion when I lost my job almost five years ago. It wasn’t easy but definitely doable, and I’ve lived to tell about it.

Related Post: It’s A New Dawn, It’s A New Day, It’s A New Life For Me

It happens more often than you think. New management cancels a position, a company goes bankrupt, or you have an epiphany on the bus home one night, and all of a sudden, you know it’s time for you to switch careers. When that happens, whether in your late thirties, forties or fifties, reinventing yourself may seem like an impossible task. But with a little preparation and a lot of determination, you can take on change with a clarity that will lead you right into your next dream job.

In a recent post for Entrepreneur.com I wrote about changing careers in your later years. In this week’s Ready4Air, I share  “What You Need To Do To Make A Midlife Career Change.”

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Coming up:  What You Need to Do to Make a Midlife Career Change

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (The Week Ahead) | Reporter Go-To Stories For Year End | The Ultimate Holiday Movie Preview | More Voiceover Tips

Framed-2013-NYCWFF-Autumn-Leaves-1

December 1, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Framed-2013-NYCWFF-Autumn-Leaves-1

I hope everyone had a bountiful and restful Thanksgiving! While many people have what they want, there are many more who don’t have what they need. I believe there is always something to give thanks for. I hope each of you found at least one thing.

Now, it’s time to get back to work. As we geared up for the holiday weekend last week, the media was busy covering the unrest stemming from the recent grand jury verdict not to indict officer Darren Wilson for the fatal shooting of Ferguson, Missouri, teenager Michael Brown. The verdict was announced last Tuesday night, and the coverage–including an exclusive interview with Officer Wilson–has escalated over the weekend.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | The Ferguson Shooting Verdict: A Thankless One For This Holiday Season

In keeping up with the breaking news, our team at Ready4Air switched around a few posts last week because of the Ferguson story. But this week, we are back in full holiday mode. If you were looking for voiceover professional Bob Hennessy’s post on “Recovering From A Bad Voiceover Read,” look no more. It’s in this week’s lineup.

Voiceover Artist Bob Hennessy

Voiceover Artist Bob Hennessy

Voiceover auditions are available all year round. When it comes to voiceover work, anything can happen to spoil a good read, and in most cases, you won’t get a chance to do it over. Hennessy has written for Ready4Air in the past for our voiceover series Gimme The Mic. This week in Ready4Air, his tips on ways for anyone to recover from a bad voiceover read.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Gimme The Mic) | Hit It And Quit It! Self-Directing Your Voiceover Auditions.

Arise On Screen Executive Producer Debbie Mitchell and Teen Film Critic Jackson Murphy Photo Courtesy of Debbie Mitchell

Arise On Screen executive producer Debbie Mitchell and teen film critic Jackson Murphy
Photo Courtesy of Debbie Mitchell

Teen critic Jackson Murphy of Lights Camera-Jackson.com is back this week with part two of his post on his picks for the ultimate holiday movies. Jackson, a regular guest cohost on Arise On Screen, highlights his holiday season movie picks. The season is filled with movie options, including award contenders and blockbusters. Jackson shares the ones that make his list. He says there is something for everyone, whether you’re naughty or nice.

This week in Ready4Air (Film), Jackson puts the spotlight on “The Ultimate Holiday Movie Preview.”

Lyndsay Christian , Host and Producer of On the Scene Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian, host and producer of On the Scene
Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

And finally, a good story is never hard to find, especially when it comes to the holiday season. If a reporter isn’t covering a breaking news story, then the months of November, December, and January are filled with an array of go-to stories that are a gift to any good producer or reporter. These stories are ready to go and don’t require a lot of digging or thought. However, Christian says you do need to be creative.
This week in Ready4Air (TV), television personality Lyndsay Christian shares her go-to stories and  tips for writing and reporting during the  holidays.
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Coming Up: DJ Fulano on Ready4Air 
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (The Week Ahead) | Lessons For Female Entrepreneurs | Previewing ‘Beyond The Lights’ | In VO-Know Your Voice

2014 American Express Open Forum: CEO Bootcamp
Photo credit: Deborah Mitchell Media Associates.

November 10, 2014 | Posted in Film, Lifestyle Lineup (Food,Fashion,Travel,Books), TV Production | By

 

2014 American Express Open Forum: CEO Bootcamp Photo credit: Deborah Mitchell Media Associates.

2014 American Express Open Forum: CEO Bootcamp
Photo credit: Deborah Mitchell Media Associates.

I am always amazed at how quickly the weeks go by, especially when it’s the holiday season. I can’t believe it’s the start of a new week already. Just last week Monday, I was at the Sheraton Times Square attending an all-day event for female entrepreneurs. The free event was sponsored by American Express and was called the OPEN FORUM: CEO BOOTCAMP. When fellow entrepreneur–Suncera Johnson, founder of Amass Digital–told me about the event, I decided to check it out and I’m glad I did. The day featured 30-45 minute breakout sessions on topics like “Standing Out in a Crowded Marketplace,” “Workshops on Strategies For Small Business,” and “Bootcamp For Your Books.” I paid very close attention to the session entitled “Social Media Power Hour” and sat in on the “Social Media Lab for Twitter and Pinterest.” The experts heading up those sessions had a lot to say and gave good advice that any business or brand could use. Designer Diane von Furstenberg was on hand for a panel discussion where she shared the story of how she built her brand, and she doled out a bit of advice for a couple of up-and-coming designers.

 

2014 American Express Open Forum: CEO Bootcamp Photo credit: Deborah Mitchell Media Associates.

2014 American Express Open Forum: CEO Bootcamp
Photo credit: Deborah Mitchell Media Associates.

 

The event featured the sessions in several ballrooms and the ladies had a chance to have their photos taken in front of a snazzy step and repeat wall. This event was perfect for me since I am a die-hard American Express fan. Those membership points have paid for many a vacation. LOL! I’ve been an American Express member since college, and I’m usually quite put off when a merchant doesn’t take the card, which happens often when I travel internationally.

However, my favorite session at the OPEN FORUM: CEO BOOTCAMP was the one led by TV personality JJ Ramberg entitled “The Perfect Pitch” where we learned to refine our company pitch into a 30-second elevator pitch. Once Ramberg gave us instructions on what to do, each table of entrepreneurs had to come up with a pitch and practice on each other. The exercise was challenging, but very useful in the end. Later this month, I will be sharing more of what I learned along with my fellow female entrepreneurs.

Beyond The Lights

Beyond The Lights

Related Post: Ready4Air (Film) | Gina Prince-Bythewood: When A Woman Is The Writer And Director

Director and writer Gina Prince-Bythewood is one entrepreneur who is very busy these days. On Friday, her latest film Beyond the Lights–a modern-day love story starring Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Nate Parker–opens in theaters nationwide. The writer and director has a great track record in Hollywood and fans of her highly successful debut film Love & Basketball are waiting to see if she’s done it again. Prince-Bythewood will join us on Arise On Screen on Saturday, but host Mike Sargent sat down with her for a radio interview and asked her what the new film meant to her.

Prince-Bythewood had this to say: “This film is very important to me. It’s a story that’s been locked in my head for many, many years. It’s really about a young woman who’s pushed into a highly sexualized persona to get ahead in the music industry, and it works. She becomes very successful, but at a cost, and the film is really about that cost to her soul.”

This week on Ready4Air (Film), more of Mike Sargent’s interview with Gina Prince-Bythewood.

Voiceover Artist Bob Hennessy

Voiceover Artist Bob Hennessy

Related Post: Ready4Air (Gimme The Mic) | The Daily Auditioner: Home Recording Your Voiceovers

We are ecstatic to have another guest post from voiceover artist Bob Hennessy. I met Bob during the holiday season last year and he’s a former veteran television cameraman who has reinvented his career and I love it. Doing voiceover work may appear easy, but it is harder than it looks. It turns out that doing voiceovers is one part of having a good voice along with being a good actor.

This week in Ready4Air (TV), Bob writes about finding your voice as a voiceover artist. Hennessy lets us know that, “First of all, you know your own voice. Maybe you’re not Don Pardo. Maybe you’re more Don Knotts. That’s fine; there’s work out there for you.”

That is good news. If you know your voice then you could be working it.

on air

And finally, if you are in New York City on Tuesday, November 11, join me at the latest Savor The Success event. I will be the guest speaker for the NYC LIVE Mastermind: How to Master the Art of Being Interviewed. As an entrepreneur, you and your brand will want press at some point. When you get in front of the camera, you want to be ready for air and I will be giving tips on how to be your best before the cameras.

During the intimate group session, I will share the following:

• How to increase your comfort level appearing in front of any media audience and how to use your own particular style with ease to get your message across
• Discover how to handle challenging questions
• Use the power of three to tell stories concisely and efficiently anywhere
• Design an effective website, YouTube channel, and sizzle reel to maximize your media appearance

These tips will take you and your business to the next level. So make a little time to top by and say hi.

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Coming up: Mike Sargent’s interview with Gina Prince-Blythewood

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

 

 

 

 

 

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Ready4Air (TV Production) | Keep Your Productivity Up On Business Trips With These 4 Pro Tips

Image-12-copy

November 5, 2014 | Posted in Festival of Cannes 2014, TV Production | By

2014 Cannes Film Festival Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

2014 Cannes Film Festival
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

First published on Entrepreneur.com
on November 3rd, 2014

Earlier this year, I worked on location at the Cannes Film Festival in France with the production team of Arise On Screen, the movie review show I produce. We were on a tight, five-day schedule as we taped shows on location and then fed the video back to New York where post-production was done. The long shoot days and the seven-hour time difference with our colleagues back home made things even more complicated.

While it’s tempting to think that the only prerequisite to a successful business trip is to have your trusty laptop, you can quickly miss the convenience of your office when you’re thousands of miles away. Replace Cannes with the destination of your choice and use these helpful tips on how to handle out-of-town business.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | 4 Tips to Being Your Brand’s Champion on TV and YouTube

Establish your communication needs. Internet access, roaming charges, data usage — these are all things you have to think about before leaving for your trip, not when you get to your hotel. A call to your phone company before you leave can prevent any surprises on your trip. If you are traveling abroad, you should activate your phone for international travel. Can you make and receive phone calls? What is the rate for the country where you will be based?

Another option is to buy a local phone in the country in which you are traveling and purchase credit as you need it. This is also an easier way for you to keep track of your business expenses. I ended up buying a phone in Cannes and it worked out perfectly for the trip.

Identify your local assets. Who are your contacts on the ground? It is best to coordinate a book of everyone’s contact information including email addresses, phone numbers and any social-media information. If you are staying in a hotel, find out where the office center is located and its hours of operation. It is also important to make note of any wi-fi charges or expenses that might apply for using the office center.

We had our set and crew ready when we arrived. Thanks to our solid contacts and organization, we hit the ground running.

Arise TV shooting at Cannes Film Festival 2014 Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Arise TV shooting at Cannes Film Festival 2014 Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV Production) | 5 Do’s and Don’ts for Making the Most of a Television Appearance

Be ready to wear a few different hats. When you are on the road, you may have to work twice as hard as when you are in the office. Whether you’re alone or traveling with a smaller team, all the little things the intern or office assistant usually handles may become your responsibility. No job should be too small for you if the need arises. It is probably best to find out the skills of everyone on your business team since multi-tasking takes on a new meaning when you’re on the road!

Sleep when you can. When you are on a business trip, every minute counts as you fill your schedule with meetings and business events throughout the day and night, which means you will probably get your eight-hour beauty sleep — spread over five days. When you get time to nap, take it! Naps are a useful way to re-energize. A short nap of 20 to 30 minutes is good for improving your alertness and performance. Make sure you find a quiet and comfortable place to lie down and catch a few quick zzz’s.

Doing business on the road can, and should be, fun! But unless you’re prepared and your trip is planned, your productivity might take a blow. So follow these tips and bon voyage!

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Coming Up: Buppy Hipster’s Tips for Self-Published Authors

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (TV) | Putting Your Best “Face” Forward : Maximizing Talent Appearances

Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

October 21, 2014 | Posted in Live Event Production Notes, TV Production | By

 

Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

Serving as television talent for a network is a major responsibility. You’re considered “the face” of the network at public events. It’s important to be on point. There are several factors you must consider and execute to maximize the experience for you and for the company you are representing. It’s a win-win situation, so make the best of it! Here’s how:

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | A TV Host Breaks Down His Show Prep And Performance

  1. Memorize the company’s “M”–its mission, mantra, or message. When you’re at an event, it’s important to know the brand so that you can eloquently market it to others.
  2. Always be on point. Hair, wardrobe, makeup–all things head-to-toe must be sharp. You are the face of the brand and a spokesperson. Many will associate your image with the brand. You will likely be photographed with viewers or stakeholders in the company.
  3. Smile! It’s simple, yet so effective. People are watching you from each angle. They are observing you up close and personal. Be warm, engaging, and authentic in your approach.
  4. Activate your savvy social media skills. When you’re engaging with viewers, snap photos with them and post them to your social media channel. Encourage a retweet or repost. You’ll gain a new follower and so will the network!
  5. Be flexible. Whether you’re at a gala or parade, you’ll likely be pulled in many directions. Be friendly and available to accept whatever task you’re given. Interviewing guests, signing autographs, making introductions–juggle all gracefully.
  6. Work the room/event. Network. Meet people. This will help your personal brand.
  7. Most importantly, have fun! There’s nothing like engaging with the community and impacting lives via your talent and skills.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) |Public Relations 101:Choosing A PR Firm For Your Business

Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian (@LynzChristian) is the host and producer of On the Scene, a weekly entertainment newsmagazine show…only on @KollideTV.

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Stay Tuned!

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell – Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air The Week Ahead | Creating Your Third Act | TV Talent Putting Your Best Face Forward | A Brand’s Buggy Situation

Essence Magazine, November 2014
Photo Credit: Nay Ayache and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

October 20, 2014 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect, Film, Live Event Production Notes, TV Production | By

 

Essence Magazine, November 2014 Photo Credit: Nay Ayache and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Essence magazine, November 2014
Photo Credit: Nay Ayache and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Happy Monday, all!

First off, I want to thank Elaine Brown for writing a great piece, entitled “The 3rd Act” (page 118) for the November issue of ‪#‎EssenceMagazine‬. The article follows four women, including me, who were pushed into or chose their professional Third Act. We all have different stories and each of us share a lesson learned through our experiences. Elaine ends the piece with an age-related guide on how to manage your career path through the years. Well done, Elaine! You can see a link to the article at the end of this post.

It’s a sure bet that whether you are starting a new business, network, or television show, there are bound to be bumps in the road. In a startup, there are so many unpredictable variables that juggling them all can become a little mind numbing and stressful, to say the least. As a business person, producer, or employee, your job is to figure out how to handle it all. If you have control of the situation then figure out how to fix it. If the situation is out of your control, you must decide the best option in order to get to your desired goal. While thinking about your professional options, try to remove all emotion, focus on the big picture, write down the pros and cons, and talk to a trusted advisor or friend before making your final decision. In the end, whatever you do is a personal decision.

Success is liking yourself, liking what you do, and liking how you do it. ~ Maya Angelou

If you don’t value your time, neither will others. Stop giving away your time and talents. Value what you know and start charging for it. ~ Kim Garst

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) |Yes, I’m Networking! TV Jobs Are Really Hard To Find

Lyndsay Christian , Host and Producer of On the Scene Photos: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

Lyndsay Christian, host and producer of On the Scene.
Photo: Courtesy of Lyndsay Christian

When you are the talent for a network, everything you do is scrutinized on and off the job. When appearing in public for events, you are the face of the network. Ever wonder about the talent dos and don’ts when appearing at these events? What is the best way to maximize the experience for yourself and the brand?

This week in Ready4Air (TV), guest contributor Lyndsay Christian is back. The new host and producer of On the Scene, a weekly entertainment newsmagazine show on @KollideTV will fill us in on how talent can put their best faces forward at public events.

Related Post: When You Are On-Air Criticism Comes With The Job (VIDEO)

 

Film critic Jackson Murphy of Lights-Camera-Jackson. Photo Credit: Jackson Murphy

Film critic Jackson Murphy of Lights-Camera-Jackson.
Photo Credit: Jackson Murphy

Have you noticed the latest trend in movie trailers? If you think they’re too long, give away too much, and that there are too many of them, you’re right! But that’s just the beginning.

This week in Ready4Air (Film) teen film critic Jackson Murphy puts a spotlight on the latest trends in movie trailers.

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

And finally, in this week’s Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) we gear up for Halloween. While traveling, the last thing we want to see in a hotel room is any kind of creepy-crawly creature sharing our space. What would you do if you came face-to-face with a surprise guest? How should brands handle the situation if a customer contacts them with a bug problem?

By the way, to read more about my career 3rd Act and how to get ready for yours check out the full November essence magazine story here.

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Coming Up: How to Maximize Talent Appearances
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

 

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Ready4Air (TV) | Yes, In TV, Age Matters: “Aren’t You A Little Old To Be A Producer?”

October 16, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Sometimes an unexpected question stops you dead in your tracks. Every now and then, a question leaves you pondering about it for days after. “Aren’t you a little old to be a producer?” is one of those questions. Recently, a female producer friend of mine, who is African American and just made  the 60-year-old mark, was asked that question by a male guest she had booked for a segment. Really?!  I was furious when she told me the full story which I will get back to  in a minute.

What difference does age make in being a producer, anyway? In TV, when you are behind the scenes, should age matter?  I asked a television executive who is always on the lookout for  good producers, and she told me: “Managers want young brains. They believe that younger people come in with new, fresh ideas and are on top of the trends. And most times it’s more cost effective to bring in younger workers.”

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

So where does that leave my older producer friend or any veteran producer looking for work? By the way, here is the full story behind the disturbing question, “Aren’t you a little old to be a producer? It came from a guest who is an expert in his field, and has done quite a bit of media. The irony is that he is in his mid-50s. Here is a recap of this gentleman’s conversation before his segment in the green room with my producer friend:

“I hope you don’t mind me asking, but aren’t you a little old to be a producer?” I was really shocked by the question, so I said to him, “Well, actually, I kind of do mind,” because I’ve certainly learned over the years that there are certain things you don’t have to accept. So, of course, I was very aware that he was going to be on our show in 15 or 20 minutes, and I didn’t respond the way I really wanted to respond. Frankly, I was not sure, but I wasn’t happy with that question at all. I was shocked and I felt kind of bad about it. So I said, “Well, it does bother me a little bit.” Then I said, “I’ve done this for a long time so I like what I do.” I started giving him more information about my background, which in hindsight was a way of defending my presence and my credibility. He said that most of the producers he meets are very young, and that basically they don’t know that much, and that they don’t know anything about the business he’s in.

In the end my friend was left to wonder, “Gosh, do I look that old? I mean, I just turned sixty, and it made me wonder why he asked me that. It was really inappropriate and I couldn’t help but question myself.” We all want to believe that age doesn’t matter, especially when you are good at your job. In television it’s very easy to be insecure when you know your industry, a visual one, covets the younger generation.

Related Post: It’s A New Dawn, It’s A New Day, It’s A New Life For Me

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

The guest’s comment that most of the producers he meets are very young, that they don’t know that much, and that they don’t know anything about the business he’s in says it all for me. It is true. Having lost a career job at the age of 47 and experiencing firsthand how difficult it is to convince potential employers during interviews–who, by the way, are in their late 20s and early 30s–that my 25 years of production experience is valuable to a television team, I know the challenges faced by other veteran producers. On one of my interviews, I was asked by an interviewer if I knew how to write. She asked this question as she commented on my extensive and diverse work experience. REALLY? I realize that a lot of industries are closing the doors on seasoned workers, but television which  caters to viewers of all races, creeds, colors, ages, and genders–should do the same thing before and behind the cameras.

I spoke to a few industry insiders of both genders and different races to get their take on the subject. For obvious reasons, I will not be revealing their names, but they were happy to talk about  ageism in television.

A longtime male friend, who is white, has deep roots in the television and radio industry and recently turned 60, sent me this email: “I grew up around the TV business, and I can tell you that 50 years ago, the experience and wisdom of older employees was valued. That has drastically changed, and anyone who works in the business now can attest to the lack of diversity when it comes to age. There are some anomalies on air and in upper management, but few older people among the rank and file. I say this from personal experience, as I lost my job due to an ageist executive producer who was two years old at the time I started in the business, and he couldn’t deal with that.”

Related Post: Ready4Air | Tell Me…How Did You Get Into Television?

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

The television industry is still run predominantly by white males. Women producers are now a bigger part of production teams. People of color are employed, but continue to represent a very small fraction of the television behind the scenes; and women of color heavily outnumber men.

The television executive I mentioned earlier goes out of her way to keep her age a secret. I’ve seen her have a meltdown when she thought her birth year or age was inadvertently revealed on social media. She also says moisturizer is her best friend. Lol! With over 30 years in the industry and an incredible resume, she knows that ageism is alive and well in the television business. “I don’t want people to know my age because they will make assumptions about me.”

Tape Producer Christelle and Editor Chuck at Arise On Screen. Photo Credit: Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Tape Producer Christelle and Editor Chuck at Arise On Screen.
Photo Credit: Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

As a manager, she knows the value of having a staff that includes seasoned producers as well as younger ones, but admits that not everyone thinks that. Most believe “television is a young people’s business.”  I know some bosses who judge you on your age, your physical looks–meaning are you pretty, are you slim and trim and if you wear designer clothes.” I argued that none of those things should matter, but she contended that it shows a level of standard that this person aims for. Nowadays, younger producers have social media know-how on their side. They’ve grown up with it and can run circles around older producers who haven’t gotten a grasp of it or refuse to embrace it. And everyone wants to be a part of social media.

Behind the scenes of the Arise On Screen set Photo Credit: Mike Sargent

Behind the scenes of the Arise On Screen set.
Photo Credit: Mike Sargent

Personally, I was never one to worry about my age or even hide it when it came to my profession. As a matter of fact, I believe that I get better as I get older since I’ve been fortunate enough to learn so many different skills from so many different people during my career. Having started in the television industry at the age of 21, I slowly went from being the youngest kid in the room to 26 years later being the seasoned veteran in the room. Suddenly, being over 40 wasn’t so great professionally. I actually heard one of the young producers call P. Diddy an old man, and he’s younger and hipper than I am! At the age of 47, I was terminated from CBS News The Early Show. New management came in and I was out. It was clear they had a strong interest and attraction to being surrounded by younger men and women, but mostly women.

Image 7

Forced to salvage my career, I had to reinvent it. It took a few years and it is a work in progress. As I write this post, my story is being featured in the November issue of the national women’s magazine Essence, and guess what? My age is front and center in the article! As they say, you can run but can’t hide. Lol!

I’ve been told I look young and I feel young. I believe I still  bring a lot to the table professionally. Growing older should be a personal issue  not a professional one and your age shouldn’t determine your termination from an industry, job, or career. But in television, chances are that aging up will. As CNN continues to layoff thousands of employees, some veterans with over 18 years of experience, I think about how they will deal with the reality of finding work as an older producer.

In regards, to being terminated even with years of experience,  one 50-year-old Emmy-winning producer wrote to tell me, “When you think it’s not going to happen to you, it does!”

Have you been the victim of ageism in the workplace? I’d be happy to hear your story and share the lessons you learned.

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Coming Up: Jackson Murphy & the Box Office Mojo mystery

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell – Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

 

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Ready4Air #TBT | No Cursing In The Newsroom – Really… @#%$ Is Going On?

Framed-On-Air-Light-300x234

October 9, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Earlier, I read that the new Al Jazeera America has banned cursing in the newsroom. My first reaction was @#%$? LOL!

The New York Post‘s pagesix.com headline read Al Jazeera America Bigs Ban Newsroom F-bombs after a new staffer was heard using bad language. According to the “Page Six” column, a source told them, “The employee was heard using the F-word, and was immediately reprimanded. The employee was told that swearing is not part of the Al Jazeera culture.”

I understand that any kind of cursing can be offensive and dropping the F-bomb in the workplace is absolutely inconsiderate, rude, and politically incorrect. But the truth is, it is kind of par for the course in the newsroom. If you are wondering or haven’t seen the show The Newsroom on HBO, the actual newsroom is usually a large, shared space where you can hear people talking over one another.

While some are talking quietly on the phone, others might be shouting at the top of their lungs or yelling across the room–especially in a high-energy, pressure-cooker “breaking news” instance.  Basically, you can hear everything–the good, the bad, and the ugly, including curse words.

Related Post: When It Comes To A TV Mistake How You Handle It Really Matters

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Dare I take the liberty and say that everyone curses at one time or another in television–including the executive producer and talent. I’ve seen and heard the most sophisticated looking on-air female talent turn into a foul-mouth truck driver once the camera light is off. Remember when local New York anchor Sue Simmons was caught cursing with an open mic? LOL!  I’ve also seen the nicest and most competent coworkers lose their s**t at the office by having a foul-mouthed tirade when having a bad day. Very Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde!

As a producer, it is a guarantee that at some point in your career, you will curse, be cursed at, and be cursed out by someone. Is it right? No! Does it happen? Yes! Most of the time it’s not personal, but just a way to vent. Admittedly, it’s a very poor way to handle a stressful situation, like a guest booking you’ve been working on for days falling apart. D**n! The video you spent all day shooting has no audio. F***k! Or you’re getting ready to leave the office at 7:00 p.m. and the “Breaking News” banner starts to flash on CNN. S**t!

During my talk show days, the stories were so outrageous and stressful that the best way to describe your show after taping was to call it a “pigf**k.” The image of the word alone painted a graphic enough picture so people knew what you meant.

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

The best place to find some good cursing is the television control room of a live show. What causes a good curse, a.k.a cuss tirade? Here you go: a missed camera shot by the director, a misspelled lower third, the wrong graphic or music being played in a segment, the talent running over their allotted segment time, watching the show monitor and seeing your competition get the exclusive you didn’t get. Get the picture?

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV)| Creating “Magic” In Post Production: Getting The Show Polished For Air

A friend, who is an attorney, used to say to me, “I can’t believe what goes on in your industry. Does anyone report it?” Most likely, no. It helps to have a tough skin if you are going to work in television and you have to choose your battles. If the curse words bother or offend you that much, then you should complain. I’m not a fan of cursing, but sometimes a curse word is just what you need. As for the staffers at Al Jazeera America, when you feel a curse word coming on, bite your tongue, take a walk, or look for another @#%$ job.

A quick look at on-air cursing caught on tape:

The Today Show crew talks about a little off-color language in the newsroom while reporting on North Dakota anchor A.J. Clemente, who was caught cursing in an open mic and was fired after his first day on the job. Oops!

 

How offended would you be if there was cursing on your job?

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Coming Up: Interview with Gina Prince-Bythewood

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell – Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (TV) | Actor Joe Pantoliano Talks TV, Movies, And Mental Illness

Joe Pantoliano on the set of Arise On Screen. Photo credit: Michelle Lynne Madar and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

October 7, 2014 | Posted in Film, TV Production | By

Deborah Mitchell with Joe Pantoliano. Photo credit: Michelle Lynne Madar.

Deborah Mitchell with Joe Pantoliano. Photo credit: Michelle Lynne Madar.

Yes, he has been in over 100 movies and television shows, but all I could think of when I met Joe Pantoliano last month was the late HBO hit show The Sopranos. He was Ralph “Ralphie” Cifaretto , who coupled up with Tony Soprano’s baby sister, Janet, to form one of the most dysfunctional couples in my television history.

The day he was scheduled to be interviewed, we almost lost our tape slot since Arise America had to run a news special covering the execution of another American journalist by ISIS. The special aired during our 4:00 p.m. pre-interview time. But instead of Joe walking away to the offer of a later tape time, he sat for a long radio interview with our host, Mike Sargent, and cooled his heels in our green room until we could fit him in the studio. Nice guy!

Related Post: Ready4Air | Coping On The Job As A News Journalist

Joe Pantoliano on the set of Arise On Screen. Photo credit: Michelle Lynne Madar and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Joe Pantoliano on the set of Arise On Screen. Photo credit: Michelle Lynne Madar and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

During his wait time, crew members and staffers stopped by to chat with him. With his signature pageboy cap flipped around backwards on his head, Joey Pants didn’t look like a man about to turn 63 in a few days. The funnier thing is that everyone who met him recalled their favorite character he played, including Captain Howard in Bad Boys with Will Smith, Cypher in The Matrix, or Cosmo Renfro in The Fugitive. Joey Pants has made a name for himself as a great Hollywood character actor, but even with the good times he’s faced a few personal challenges: he suffers from dyslexia and clinical depression. He speaks about his mental illness publicly and has founded a non-profit organization, No Kidding, Me Too! to unite members of the entertainment industry in educating the public about mental illness.

Related Post: One By One My Mobsters Are Leaving Me

Joe Pantoliano with Arise On Screen host Mike Sargent. Photo credit: Michelle Lynne Madar and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Joe Pantoliano with Arise On Screen host Mike Sargent. Photo credit: Michelle Lynne Madar and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

You gotta love a guy who can talk about the good and the challenges in life, and that’s what Joey Pants did when he sat down for this interview on Arise On Screen.

Take a look:

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Coming Up: Gina Prince-Bythewood: When A Woman Is The Writer And Director

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air The Week Ahead |A Visit With Joey Pants | An All Inclusive Vacation Surprise | Writer And Director Gina Prince- Bythewood

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October 6, 2014 | Posted in Film, Lifestyle Lineup (Food,Fashion,Travel,Books), TV Production | By

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The Grand Bahia Principe resort in the Dominican Republic. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

First of all, I want to thank the DMMA team, Nay Ayache and our newest team member, Alexis Trass Walker, for keeping the train on the tracks last week while I was gone. I was out of the country for a few days and the ladies kept all the balls in the air and for this I say, “Thank You, Thank You, Thank You!”

My trip turned out to be an interesting one; fun and filled with a few surprises including being introduced to a new hotel brand, The Grand Bahia Principe. It’s an all-inclusive hotel in the Dominican Republic that I found online at the last minute. More about that later.

This week on Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers), I take off my production hat to blog about my latest travel adventure.

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Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell & Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Related Post: Cookin’ and Cruisin’ on the High Seas with The Norwegian Epic

Now, it’s time to get back to my television life. Whether you are heading up a television show or a company, the product’s success is only as good as the team. I’ve written about my small team at Arise On Screen. Everyone knows their responsibilities, keeps a lookout, and lends a hand wherever needed. My favorite moments are when the members of my young TV team don’t wait for me to tell them what to do; instead they are proactive, looking at the big picture, evaluating what’s needed, coming up with ideas, and jumping into action. This is a leader’s dream team in any company.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) | Creating Social Media Buzz For Arise On Screen

Writer and Director Gina Prince-Bythewood & Deborah Mitchell

Writer and director Gina Prince-Bythewood and Deborah Mitchell. Photo Credit: Michelle Lynne Madar.

Later in the week, we catch up with writer and director Gina Prince-Bythewood. She is one of those rare gems in Hollywood, a female writer and director who also happens to be African American. Her debut film–Love & Basketball released in 2000–tells the romantic story of Quincy McCall (Omar Epps) and Monica Wright (Sanaa Lathan), childhood friends who are both talented basketball players. But will their love of basketball get in the way of their love for one another? Epps and Lathan had incredible chemistry and the film has become a classic.

It turns out romance storytelling is a favorite genre for the writer and director. Gina’s latest film–Beyond the Lights, another love story set in the music industry–comes out in November. The movie stars Belle actress Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Nate Parker–another perfect on-screen couple. I asked Prince-Bythewood about creating these amazing on-screen pairings. She told me, “It’s really the role of the director to create an environment where actors can develop themselves fully. And the amazing thing is that people believe them as a couple, and that’s your goal in a love story.”

This week on Ready4Air(Film), writer and director Gina Prince-Bythewood talks about her love of romance films and getting work done in Hollywood.

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Joe Pantoliano with Deborah Mitchell at the studio of Arise On Screen. Photo Credit: Michelle Lynne Madar.

 

And finally, actor Joe Pantoliano, a.k.a Joey Pants, stopped by the Arise On Screen studio last month for an interview a few days before his 63rd birthday. Our studio crew and staff went a little crazy with excitement and Joey Pants went right along with the energy and had fun. You should know that Joe Pantoliano has been in over 100 movies and television series, including The Matrix, The Fugitive, and my favorite, Midnight Run with Robert DeNiro. But he’ll always be Ralph “Ralphie” Cifaretto on The Sopranos. Ralphie and Janet Soprano took dysfunctional couples to a new level.

This week on Ready4Air (TV), a look at our interview with our favorite character actor Joe Pantoliano.

Stay tuned…

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Coming Up: Interview with Gina Prince-Bythewood

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell – Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (TV) | Yes, I’m Networking! TV Jobs Are Really Hard To Find

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October 2, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Photo credits: Kimberly Miller

Photo credits: Kimberly Miller

 

By Kimberly Miller

Your resume must look sharp. Your job search methods must be fresh, creative, powerful. You need a prepared list of personal and professional references and a versatile cover letter that can be tweaked for every different type of potential interview. And you need to network, network, network! This was just some of the helpful advice doled out this morning by my Jersey Job Club leader, a lovely woman named Cynthia.

What is a Jersey Job Club? It’s a helpful meeting place for unemployed people living in the Garden State, a “club” where job seekers can go to get ideas, get advice, get encouragement and, of course, network. I sat through a 90-minute orientation this morning in a drab East Orange building staffed by cheerful and helpful Department of Labor workers and I left feeling better about my chances of winding up back in the workforce. There were about a dozen other women in the room with me, ranging in age from early 30s to mid-60s and crossing a wide swath of the career and education spectrum. We had all been downsized by companies looking to save money, stay afloat, or went belly up. We were all frustrated and rather stunned by our current situations and while we may have been a bit depressed and discouraged upon entering the room at 10:00 a.m., I believe we all left feeling positive and empowered.

Related Post: Ready4Air | Who Is Wrangling TV Guests Right Before and After A Show? The Stage Manager

Photo credits: Kimberly Miller

Photo credits: Kimberly Miller

Some of the unemployed women in the room had had clerical jobs in nearby schools. Some had worked in collections. A few had worked for lawyers or executives. They had all been employed in what I would consider more “conventional” fields than mine. For the better part of three decades, I have worked as a freelance television stage manager. It’s never been the kind of job for which you would see a help wanted ad in a newspaper (remember newspapers?), or on a typical electronic job-search bulletin board. It’s not the sort of position that requires the help of a headhunter. It’s the kind of job that you somehow manage to get in your 20s–hopefully right out of college–and then maintain and grow through internal networking. The more you work, the more new job leads you hear. The different and creative ways that people use to obtain their first jobs in the industry are about as varied and numerous as there are job titles in TV production, from following in a family member’s footsteps to interning or working as a page to DJ-ing a TV station’s Christmas party and asking everyone there to send over the person who hires crew members. Yeah, that last one, that was my creative path into the land of television. Smart, right? Serendipitous, even. It worked and I had a fabulous 30-year career.

Related Post: It’s A New Dawn, It’s A New Day, It’s A New Life For Me

Lately, the jobs have been hard to come by. I worked the Olympic games in London, Vancouver, Beijing, and Torino, but not earlier this year in Sochi, and I’m still not really sure why. I’ve had a few freelance gigs here and there, but not enough to live on. And at the start of this year, I thought my troubles were over when I landed a position on the crew of an awesome new cable health and wellness show. We were supposed to be on the air for at least a year, maybe get picked up for syndication, and survive past that projection, but the show was hemorrhaging money and was canceled after eight short months. So now I’m unemployed again and having a hard time with it.

At the Job Club today we were reminded to stay focused and stay positive. I have a difficult time with that no matter how much I try. I asked Alyson Charles, one of the hosts of the show I had most recently been working on, to suggest a few daily affirmations I could say to hopefully keep my mind filled with positive thoughts that would crowd out the feeling of doom and gloom I so often experience in stressful situations. She happily obliged. My favorite was, “I am a being of divine light and love and my purpose here is to embody that through my words, thoughts, and actions. And so it is!” Thanks, Aly. I have been repeating that every day along with, “Help me, please, thank you,” to stay positive and grateful and attract the job I desire. I have treated my search as a full-time job and I have been networking my butt off. Friends and colleagues have chimed in with leads and ideas, for which I am so very grateful. I have looked through old contact numbers and reached out to people I have not heard from in years. Meanwhile, I have remained open to the idea of a new career in a similar but different field. I’m not exactly 21st-century-ready, but I’m smart and I learn quickly.

Photo credits: Kimberly Miller

Photo credits: Kimberly Miller

One suggestion the Job Club leader made today was to create something called a visual board. It’s supposed to be a poster that you place where you can see it daily and it should contain images that represent your goal. I told Cynthia and the other women in the room that I have been continuously and frequently changing my profile photos on Facebook and LinkedIn and rotating through older and newer pictures of me working as a stage manager to remind myself, other people, and the universe what it is that I have done, what it is that I still do. Then I asked if that counted as a visual board. It does. But just to make sure, here are some more photos that I send out, with all good intentions, to affirm what it is that I am, what I do, what I want and deserve:

Thanks for reading this blog post. If you have any job leads, please let me know! DJGRRR17@aol.com

Photo credits: Kimberly Miller

Photo credits: Kimberly Miller

Kimberly Miller wants to to fill her calendar up with “just enough” work to keep that rock star smile soothing celebrities. If you would like to chat further with Kim about an opportunity — give her a quick shout at DJGRRR17@aol.com — she would love to see what projects you are working on and how she can offer her stage manager expertise and wisdom!

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Coming Up: 5 Things to Do Before Saying ‘I Do’ to a Business Partner

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

 

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Ready4Air (Social Media) | A Photographer Gets Close To The People Before The Lens

Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates
Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage
Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

October 1, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Nick Viagas (center) in Arise On Screen control room Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Nick Viagas (center) in the Arise On Screen control room.
Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

At Arise On Screen, I am the production photographer–a name I made up. Nobody not named “Nick Viagas” has ever called me that. I’m Mike Sargent’s intern, who fell into the lovely job of taking photos of our Saturday tapings for social media. Though I have no experience as a photographer, I have found a couple of tricks that help me take photos I think are pretty cool and really pop out on people’s news feeds.

 

First, I always take photos with people in them. The first week or so, I took photos of just about everything. Looking back on it, I understand that nobody wants to see 20 pictures of a dimly lit, empty hallway. People are more interesting. It’s what the show is about.
Second, I take photos that are as close as possible to the subject. When I volunteered to be the PP, as I call it, Terry Richardson was the only photographer whose name I knew. When I take pictures of the guests backstage, I’m basically doing a second-rate impression of his work and process. I don’t have the expensive camera or the big-time subjects, but what I respond to is the close range of his pictures. It makes the photo feel more intimate, like you’re meeting the subject at a party. I think allowing our guests to do whatever they want without posing them makes for a better picture. Although I can’t always do this in the control room or during taping, I try to have as little negative space as possible in any photo I take for the show. Here’s an example:

 

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social Media) | Creating Social Media Buzz For Arise On Screen

Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Film critics Raqiyah Mays and Bobby Rivers having fun backstage. Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Isn’t that adorable? This came from simply telling Raqiyah and Bobby to do something fun in the green room. Since they are professional entertainers, this is what came out.
Arise On Screen host and film critic Mike Sargent Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen host and film critic Mike Sargent.
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

 

Finally, I try to take a lot of photos in the studio because they always look good. It’s a room made to be looked at through a lens. I always have the “On Screen” logo in the background if we’re in the studio. For all I’ve said about creativity, the most important thing about social media photography is advertising. You’re trying to get people to like your page. If someone looks at that picture on their feed, they are going to know that this is a photo from a TV show called Arise On Screen.
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Thanks, Nick!Coming Up: Ready4Air (TV) | Yes, I’m Networking!: TV Jobs Are Really Hard To Find 

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

Read More...

Ready4Air The Week Ahead|Tips From A TV Production Photographer |The TV Job Hunt Pep Talk | 5 Things to Do Before Saying ‘I Do’ to a Business Partner

Arise On Screen set before taping.
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

September 29, 2014 | Posted in Film, TV Production | By

Arise On Screen set before taping. Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen set before taping.
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 Happy first week of fall, everybody! Since it’s all about being more social and posting interesting information and photos, we’ve all had to become used to having our pictures taken. On our set, resident Arise On Screen photographer Nick Viagas, who is also an intern, is always lurking with the camera to capture the best and most interesting shots. Because he’s always doing the shooting, I had a hard time finding a photo with him in it. LOL! Most Saturdays, Nick is in charge of getting the great shots that we use on our social media.

 

This week in Ready4Air, Nick tells us just what goes into getting those amazing candid shots.

 

Kimberly Miller, Stage Manager

Kimberly Miller, Stage Manager

 

Long-time television stage manager Kimberly Miller knows firsthand what it’s like to be unable to enjoy fall’s back-to-business spirit. In a guest post this week, entitled Yes, I’m Networking!: TV Jobs Are Really Hard To Find, Kimberly returns and writes about her ongoing job hunt and how to stay positive in the process in an industry where who you know is more important than what you know.

 

This week in Ready4Air, Kim writes about finding support and visualizing your work future.

 

 

Speaking of visualizing your work future, are you about to venture into a new business relationship? Last week, Entrepreneur.com featured my latest article, 5 Things to Do Before Saying ‘I Do’ to a Business Partner, on their front page. I was psyched. As it turned out, the piece resonated with a few folks out there. The last time, I checked the post had been retweeted 51 times! If you missed it, we’ll repost it this week on Ready4Air.

 
Related Post: Ready4Air (TV Production) | 5 Do’s and Don’ts for Making the Most of a Television Appearance 
 

Film critic Jackson Murphy of Lights-Camera-Jackson. Photo Credit: Jackson Murphy

Film critic Jackson Murphy of Lights-Camera-Jackson.
Photo Credit: Jackson Murphy

 

And finally, coming off of the weekend, our favorite teen film critic Jackson Murphy ranks the only twelve stop-motion animated movies ever made. This weekend’s The Boxtrolls got slammed at the box office by the Denzel Washington movie The Equalizer, but that doesn’t mean the movie is a dud. The film is about a boy named Eggs who is orphaned at birth and then rescued by trash-collecting trolls. When a villain threatens his new life, Eggs has to fight and save his underground family.
This week on Ready4Air, The Boxtrolls is one of a dozen stop-motion films that Jackson reviews (Spoiler alert: he’s not a big fan of Coraline. LOL!).

 

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Coming Up: Lights -Camera- Jackson Reveals Stop-Motion Animation’s Best Films 
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

Read More...

#Repost | Ready4Air |A Birthday Reflection: The Choices We Make…..

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September 25, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

The Irish Ambassador’s residence in Washington, D.C., April 2012.
Photo credit: Marian Rivman

By Marian Rivman

The choices we make as young adults can profoundly affect the rest of our lives. The seminal seed of the woman I grew to be was planted during an assembly in my senior year at the Bronx High School of Science. A Science graduate who was joining one of the first Peace Corps groups came to talk to us. Peace Corps service resonated with both my desire to make a difference in the world and to have a life far beyond the Bronx. I would have signed on right then and there, but you needed a college degree. I made a solemn commitment to myself that I would join the Peace Corps as soon as I graduated from college.

Graduation day at Hunter College, June 1966.
Photo credit: Marian Rivman

My father made it crystal clear that if I wanted a college education, I better get accepted by one of the City University of New York (CUNY) schools because they were tuition-free. Hunter College in the Bronx was my choice. I lived at home and walked to classes. To appease my parents, I was an education major (“You can always fall back on it.”). I did a second major in anthropology to prepare myself for the globetrotting life I planned to live. After graduating from Hunter, I spent the summer of 1966 in a Peace Corps training program in Cambridge, Massachusetts. My training group flew to the Philippines on September 12, 1966, my 21st birthday. I took it as a sign.

The Philippines was definitely not the Bronx, but my assignment was also not the tropical paradise I had envisioned. My first year, I lived in a dusty, dangerous inland town on the island of Mindanao.

Related post: Ready4Air | Coping On The Job As A News Journalist

Tacurong, an inland town on the island of Mindanao.
Photo credit: Marian Rivman

There was no running water. Sometimes there was electricity from 4:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Telegraphs were the most advanced communication technology available. Pigs and chickens walked through my bedroom at will. The rats were the size of cats. Sewage ran in ditches along the side of the road. Women never went out unaccompanied. Men played mah-jong with their guns on the table and the heat and humidity rivaled hell.

When the municipal judge was shot to death on Easter Sunday while taking Holy Communion—my family read the story in the New York Times and went crazy—the Peace Corps finally granted my request to be transferred to Davao City. I had done a summer project for Bayanihang Manggagawa (Brotherhood of Workers), a local non-profit, and they wanted me back. I helped to create the first comprehensive telephone book for the city of Davao, which they sold to raise money.

The Bayaniyang Mangagawa office in Davoa City.
Photo credit: Marian Rivman

Bayanihang helped indigent Filipinos—who had been forced to leave land they had farmed as squatters—adjust to city life and find a way to earn enough money to feed and house their families. A Maryknoll priest and a missionary couple from the United Church of Christ were the founders. Some of the most prominent businessmen in the city were on the board. They all thought it fitting for a Jewish Peace Corps Volunteer (PCV) to join their ecumenical effort.

Décor in my Davao apartment included a life-size wooden caribou and farmers’ hats from local villages.
Photo credit: Marian Rivman

My year in Davao City was an extraordinary personal and professional experience. I found an apartment in the heart of downtown. While a woman could be on the streets unaccompanied, it was strictly taboo to live alone. I was to live with another PCV. For a myriad of reasons, roommates passed through at the rate Murphy Brown went through secretaries. No matter. I was incredibly happy and fulfilled.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) |It’s Personal and Business: The Human Side of Social Networking

Forget VitaCoco or Zico. This is the way to drink coconut water.
Photo courtesy Marian Rivman

Compared to my first assignment, Davao was heaven. Work was great. I designed training programs and spearheaded a study of Philippine handicrafts that would be suitable for cottage industries. Between my Bayanihang colleagues and the dozens of PCVs assigned as teachers at schools in and around the city, I had a busy social life. I spent holidays and vacations exploring the Philippines. Be there no mistake, most of the country is the tropical paradise of my fantasies. In addition, Filipinos are warm, welcoming people. I have been back several times in the last four decades.

By June 1968, the end of my tour of duty, Bayanihang was a highly respected and effective organization. A half a dozen PCVs were going to spend the summer working on initiatives I had helped to develop. The plaque I received at my farewell party still hangs in my apartment.

The plaque I received when I left the Philippines that hangs in my New York City apartment. Photo credit: Marian Rivman 

I took the long way home traveling to Japan, Hong Kong, Thailand, Cambodia, India, Nepal, Afghanistan, Iran, Israel, and Greece. It was mind-boggling. Serving in the Peace Corps and traveling so extensively at such a young age has informed my worldview my entire life.

Since it’s creation in 1961, 200,000 Americans have served in 139 countries. I am proud to have been one of them. Once I am no longer responsible for the care of my 95-year-old invalid mother, there’s a good possibility that I’ll sign up for another tour of duty.

For more information about the Peace Corps go to http://www.peacecorps.gov/

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Stay Tuned!

 

Marian Rivman is a New York based public relations and communications consultant. Her clients have included UN agencies, Fortune 500 companies, international non-profits, bold-faced names and the recreational scuba diving industry. She is known for her unbounded energy, directness and skill at translating complex issues into comprehensible messages for an array of audiences. Marian is particularly interested in the power of non-verbal communication. In addition to her independent consulting work, Marian is affiliated with New Solutions .

 

 

 

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air The Week Ahead |Is Shonda Rhimes Really Angry? |The Venice Film Festival |Being TV Social Media Savvy

A selfie of Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi with Roy Anderson. Photo Credits: Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi

September 22, 2014 | Posted in Film, TV Production | By

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Bye bye, summer. Oh, how I hate to see you go. Tuesday is the first day of autumn, so hello, fall! For many, the change of season and the crisp, cool days bring much more time spent indoors watching television and on-demand Internet. I’ll admit that I’ve been slow to get on the Netflix bandwagon, but Orange Is The New Black and House of Cards are on my “to watch” list.

After last week’s media brouhaha, viewers are sure to tune into Shonda Rhimes’s latest ABC creation, How to Get Away With Murder. Viola Davis stars as Annalise Keating, a take-charge criminal defense lawyer. The show—which rounds out the Shondaland line-up, along with Grey’s Anatomy and  Scandal—makes Shonda Rhimes one of the most powerful African-American women in television. Her African-American characters (Olivia Pope, Dr. Miranda Bailey, and now Annalise Keating) tend to be smart, strong, opinionated, and accomplished. Last Friday, New York Times critic Alessandra Stanley focused a piece around the evolution of black female characters on television under Shonda Rhimes’s watch. Stanley began her piece, “Wrought In Their Creators Image,” with the following: “When Shonda Rhimes writes her autobiography, it should be called ‘How to Get Away With Being an Angry Black Woman.’” Stanley claimed the article was meant to be a compliment, but Shonda Rhimes and many others read it differently, and turned to Twitter to let the New York Times know. If Rhimes wasn’t angry before, I don’t blame her if she is now. Anyway, I will be tuning in. I’m not a huge fan of her shows, but I want to give her my support and contribute to her (hopefully) high ratings.

Related Post: Second Screen Syndrome: TV Viewers Engaging and Creating Online Buzz

A selfie of Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi with Roy Anderson 

A selfie of Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi with Roy Andersson. Photo credit: Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi

In a final farewell to summer, we visit European film critic Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi, who is dearly missed at our Arise On Screen New York studio. Yes, we are a little jealous that she is spending time in Italy, but we’re excited to hear what she’s been up to. While in Italy, Chiara attended the 71st annual Venice International Film Festival, the world’s oldest and most prestigious movie fest. For Chiara, it is her sixth time attending and she will write about the trip in her upcoming post. “Undoubtably, my greatest satisfaction was to interview the winner of this year’s Golden Lion,  Swedish director Roy Andersson, before he actually won it. A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence is a ruthless, humorously grotesque depiction of humankind.”

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | An Arise On Screen Co-Host Says “Ciao” for Now

This week on Ready4Air, Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi shares a few highlights from her trip to Mostra Internazionale d’Arte Cinematografica della Biennale di Venezia—International Exhibition of Cinematographic Art of the Venice Biennale.

(l) Arise On Screen Director Larry Michaels, Actor Michael Jai White and Host Michael Sargent

(l) Arise On Screen director Larry Michaels, actor Michael Jai White, and host Michael Sargent. Photo credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Falcon Rising star Michael Jai White stopped by for a chat with host Michael Sargent. He came into the studio on a Saturday morning to talk about his new film, his role as an action hero, and his love of martial arts. White is an eighth degree black belt and did his own stunts in the movie.

This week on Ready4Air, a look back at our chat with Michael Jai White, Hollywood’s newest action hero.

Photo credits: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Photo credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

And finally, a look at how we are working social media into Arise On Screen. Our team consists of a couple of great interns who work on feeding our Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube accounts. The social media management begins way before our Saturday tape day, and goes into full swing on Saturdays.

This week on Ready4Air, we’ll take a look at what goes into making Arise On Screen a little more social media savvy.

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Coming up: Interview With Gina Prince-Bythewood

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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#TBT | Ready4Air (TV) | What Makeup Can’t Hide: A Reporter Tells Her Story

Hattie-Headshot

September 18, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Hattie Live

When I was at The Early Show on CBS News, I didn’t have the privilege of working with reporter Hattie Kauffman because she was based on the West Coast and I was in New York. However, we share mutual friends and I’ve heard only great things about her both personally and as a television professional.

When I heard she had written a book, of course I wanted to read it. Hattie sent me a copy of the book right before the holidays and I took it on my Christmas vacation. Her story surprised me. In her book Falling into Place: A Memoir of OvercomingHattie turns the tables and answers a few hard questions about her own life as she shares stories of her journey from an impoverished childhood to the life of a journalist who becomes the first Native American journalist on network news.

When an unexpected midlife divorce topples her life, she finds strength to pull through and rediscover a new life rooted in Christianity and faith. In today’s guest post, Hattie reveals what she found inside once the reporter’s makeup came off.

 Hattie Headshot

By Hattie Kauffman

“The woman in front of me was in no shape to be on television. Her face was lifeless—her eyes red, swollen, vacant.”

After spending my entire adult life on camera—from the 20-something who started out in local news to the 50-something who left CBS News after two decades—I certainly know when someone’s in no shape to be on the air. So, it may surprise you that the lifeless woman I describe was my own reflection.

“My words bounced off her cold image in the mirror. She wasn’t listening. I turned away, but movement felt nearly impossible under the weight of limbs too heavy to lift.”

People on television go to great lengths to look good, to sound confident, and to come across as having it all together.

But it would be wrong to think that a high salary, makeup, and hair styling or a fabulous wardrobe can protect a person from the ruptures of life. I know. It happened to me. An unexpected midlife divorce so shook me that I found myself reeling as if the ground were not stable.

Why admit that?

Because that first tremor started the avalanche that ended up freeing me in ways I could never have imagined.

I realized that the “unstable ground” feeling was familiar—I’d felt it before. And with that, I let my childhood roll over me, all that I had tried to escape.

“This child is undernourished Teacher says, as she hands me over to the school nurse. “Just look how thin she is.”

They huddle in quiet talk.

I peek about the exam room, excited to be somewhere new. A box of tongue depressors attracts me, the wood smooth and splinter-free. I want to spill them onto the counter and build something.  Just as I go up on my tiptoes to reach for them, the nurse grabs my shoulder and turns me toward her.

She lifts my shirt and runs her finger over each rib, like a stick slapping against the slats of a fence.

During my decades as a network correspondent, I kept quiet about my childhood poverty. Instead, I told other people’s stories—their pain or victory, resilience or heartbreak.

Reporters ask who, what, where—but always about somebody else. To find my footing again, I had to turn a reporter’s questions on my past.

There were seven of us kids, often left home alone. Our parents for a time were fighting, drinking, and often disappearing. With no adults paying the bills, the heat got shut off, then the lights, and eventually the water. It wasn’t just the hunger that came from empty cupboards, it was the unpredictability. The only constant we had was constantly being caught off guard. No wonder unstable ground felt so familiar.

I wake at night to the roar of Mom, Dad, and the occasional others who stumble in with them. Like my parents, the drinking buddies appear and then vanish. Bursts of laughter careen into foul words as they battle, weep, pass out, and wake up mean. One of them cuts off my hair.

Smeared orange lipstick colors her frown.

“Lice,” the lips spit at my tangles. “Nits.”

Scissors, in unsteady hands, clip back and forth across my head.

I don’t know who she is.

“There,” the bright lips pronounce. “That’s better.” She drops the scissors and sways out of the mess that is our living room on a morning after.

There is precious relief in relaxing into the truth, whatever it might be.

A surprising gift in this has been hearing from people all over the country who say, “Me too!”—not that they were in the same circumstances exactly, but that they, too, have held secrets and finally felt free to let them go.

 Unearthing my past has been the most rewarding assignment this reporter has ever had. Without makeup, or the perfect studio lighting to take away flaws—to simply say: This is me. 

And to find that in the end, I am standing on solid ground.

###

Hattie Kauffman was the first Native American journalist ever to report on a national network evening news broadcast. For over 20 years, she was an on-camera correspondent and frequent guest anchor for ABC and CBS. She is a member of the Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho.

Excerpts from Falling into Place: A Memoir of Overcoming by Hattie Kauffman, published by Baker Books © 2013. To each Hattie or buy a copy of her book click on to her website.

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Thanks Hattie!

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (TV) | The Teleprompter Operator: Capturing The Perfect Read

September 17, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Arise On Screen Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Almost any on-air talent will tell you the only thing worse than bad video and copy is being unable to read a script in the teleprompter. The teleprompter is where a show script lives and allows a host to read material as it scrolls with script information and cues for the talent. The teleprompter operator’s job is to keep the script flowing smoothly so that it is read naturally—as though the talent is not reading. For Arise On Screen, Michelle Lynne Madar operates our show prompter. It’s a position, she literally fell into during her first week on the job. Jumping in to help in an emergency, Michelle saved the day and became our “Prompter Angel.”

Michelle Lynne Madar a.k.a "Prompter Angel" on Arise On Screen Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Michelle Lynne Madar a.k.a “Prompter Angel” on Arise On Screen
Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Michelle, how long have you been operating the teleprompter?

I’ve been the teleprompter operator since my first week working on Arise On Screen, which was back in January. The very first show I ever worked on was Episode 3 where Mike had an interview with filmmaker Warrington Hudlin. That morning, Debbie asked me if I had ever run a teleprompter before and my response was no. She then turned to me and told me that would change that day. My teleprompter training took less than five minutes because we were pressed for time. Devon turned on the system and then with quick instructions handed it off to me. Since that day I’ve been called “Prompter Angel” because I swooped in and saved the day!

How and when is the script properly loaded into the teleprompter?

My favorite professor in college, Jim Clements, used to always tell us that if there was something you didn’t understand how it worked, it was simply magic. How is the script loaded into the teleprompter? Magic! For the show, our magician—a.k.a. line producer—Steve, uses a program called iNews to create the rundown.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV)| Creating “Magic” In Post Production: Getting The Show Polished For Air

How do you control the teleprompter scroll?

Once the script is up on the teleprompter, I move the dial to the right to move forward in the script and to the left to move backwards. If at any point I need to stop it, I just go in the opposite direction of the scroll to bring it to a stop.

Arise On Screen control room

Arise On Screen control room

Each on-camera talent has a unique teleprompter reading speed and preference, so teleprompter operators must communicate with their talent. Tell me about practicing the teleprompter with Mike before a show. How important is it for the talent to practice the teleprompter read?

The run-through is EXTREMELY necessary because even though the host has already seen the script, there are usually several changes that happen throughout the morning. When we’re short on time and he doesn’t have the chance to, it can REALLY show. Being an international show, we sometimes come across some uncommon names or words that can prove to be difficult for the talent to pronounce. It’s my responsibility to keep up with his pace and when I’m familiar with the script I can plan ahead for a moment like that by slowing down the speed of the scroll.

Arise On Screen Host and Film Critic Mike Sargent Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen Host and Film Critic Mike Sargent
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

How important is it for you to communicate with the control room and Mike during the show? Tell me about how you handle it during a taping.

Being in the control room can be a very chaotic environment and sometimes it’s hard to focus on the most important person, the host. When everyone is yelling different cues in such close proximity it can be hard to hear if you’re doing things right, so that’s why I only have Mike’s mic turned on in my headset. Even though I can only hear Mike in the headset, I still have to listen to Larry or Steve in the control room in case we need to jump to a different section in the script.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | With The Clock Ticking Producers Prep On Show Day

Michelle, things do not always go as planned during production. Have you ever had an instance where the teleprompter failed? If so, tell me about it and how you recovered.

Thankfully, there has never been a technical error during production! I’m hoping it stays that way!

###

Stay Tuned!

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air The Week Ahead |Production Meetings Matter |Operating The TV Teleprompter|Michael Jai White In The Studio

(l) Arise On Screen Director Larry Michaels, Actor Michael Jai White and Host Michael Sargent

September 15, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

 

Arise On Screen Production Meeting Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Arise On Screen Production Meeting
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

How do you know you have a passion for your job? You know it when money doesn’t matter and you are willing to work for free! I see the passion in the Arise On Screen interns Nick, Lance, Catherine, and Tariq—back to school now—who all have shown up, ready to work for free every Saturday for almost six months. Always joyful, wide awake, and ready to contribute to the show and learn in any way they can, these kids have the television bug. Our “Prompter Angel” Michelle Lynn Madar started out as a show intern and was quickly promoted to production assistant. She works side-by-side with me during the week and has the desire to executive produce a show one day. I’d better look out… lol! These young people all have the drive to get in the television industry and have a lasting career. I believe I am looking at the next generation of television producers.

On Ready4Air this week, a look at production meetings and show postmortems. On show tape day, our Saturday mornings start off pretty early. We arrive to the offices of Arise On Screen at 8:00 AM, and have our show production meeting at 9. The meetings are key to organizing our show elements, brainstorming last minute ideas, and creating a roadmap for the director, producer, and host to follow during the taping. This week, Ready4Air highlights Arise On Screen production meetings and the meetings after the show.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV)| Creating “Magic” In Post Production: Getting The Show Polished For Air

Michelle Lynne Madar a.k.a "Prompter Angel" on Arise On Screen Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Michelle Lynne Madar a.k.a “Prompter Angel” on Arise On Screen
Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

When it comes to reading copy on-air, each on-camera talent has a unique teleprompter reading speed and preferences, so teleprompter operators must have excellent communication with the show talent. Michelle Lynn Madar  a.k.a “Prompter Angel” has several responsibilities on the show, including being the teleprompter operator for Arise On Screen, which she has mastered for our host Mike Sargent.

This week, she’ll share with Ready4Air exactly what it takes to correctly run script through the prompter during taping.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | With The Clock Ticking Producers Prep On Show Day

(l) Arise On Screen Director Larry Michaels, Actor Michael Jai White and Host Michael Sargent

(l) Arise On Screen director Larry Michaels, actor Michael Jai White, and host Michael Sargent

The Arise On Screen studio was filled with Michaels a few Saturdays ago. When Falcon Rising star Michael Jai White stopped by for a chat with host Michael Sargent, our director, Larry Michaels, took time out from the control room to get a photo. White came into the studio on a Saturday morning to talk about his new film and role as an action hero and his love of martial arts.

This week on Ready4Air, a look back at our chat with Michael Jai White as he sat down with film critic Mike Sargent.

Stay tuned…

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Deborah J. Mitchell
Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

 

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Ready4Air (TV) #TBT | When A Celebrity Is The Invited Guest

Jada-Pinkett-Smith-and-@TVProducerDeb-300x225

August 28, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

The awards season is well under way and soon the captivating Academy Awards will be happening in February. The Academy Awards is a night for celebrities to walk the red carpet, shine brightly and hopefully walk away with an Oscar.  Thus celebrities start primping, promoting and attending any event related to award season NOW.

Celebrity Red Carpet

While I enjoy producing and working with celebrities it can be challenging before, during, and after the award season. As a result when clients approach us to book celebrities for their events, they need to be prepared for the process. If you are thinking about inviting a celebrity or big name to be your guest of honor there are a couple of things to keep in mind.

Related Post: So You Want To Be On TV: Now Bloggers Can Get A Press Pass (VIDEO)

WHEN INVITING A CELEBRITY TO BE GUEST OF HONOR

Celebrities are great guests if you want the following for your show or event: publicity, paparazzi coverage and the possibility of unplanned, sometimes blood pressure raising “events” behind the scenes.  I’ve always said that in another life I want to come back as a celebrity. When you are a star, you have “people”, lots of “people”, around you. These “people” include managers, publicists, assistants, hair and make-up and in some cases a BFF who might feel entitled to get everything that the celebrity gets during an appearance. So booking a celebrity or big name guest requires good relationships, patience and great negotiating skills.

CONSIDER THE TIME OF YEAR OF YOUR EVENT

As I just explained the beginning of the year is filled with award ceremonies so stars have commitments. There is Fashion Week, the Super Bowl and, of course, the Oscars. Summer time is vacation time for lots of people so most likely stars are traveling for fun. If you want to know if a star is in town, keep an eye on the release date of their movie,  follow lifestyle magazines and even check their Twitter accounts. Extend the invitation as soon as you possible – don’t wait until the last minute to send it. The more time to plan the better.

WHAT LEVEL OF CELEBRITY ARE YOU PURSUING?

Is your star an  “A”, “B” or “C” level star?  Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt, George Clooney, and Oprah Winfrey are “A” level.  I will let you determine which stars fit in the remaining categories.

Rene Syler and Bette Midler 2012 C-CAP Benefit
Photo courtesy Debbie Mitchell

WHAT IS YOUR BUDGET?

Celebrities are paid for their time and appearances. They are invited to hundreds of events each year and can pick and choose where they spend their time. Making an appearance means leaving their routine life, getting camera ready and working on some else’s schedule. They will need hair and make-up, transportation (first class airfare and or car service is usual) to and from the event, and an honorarium for their time. All of this comes out of your budget. TV personality and blogger  Rene Syler, founder of website goodenoughmother.com, is constantly on the road to speak and has to consider several things before accepting an engagement. In an interview earlier this year Rene said  “I do a lot of work with breast cancer causes and would like to be able to help every single one of them. But what people don’t understand is, though the event may be fun for you and the patrons, it is work for me. I am on the clock, away from my family and have probably spent considerable time preparing for it. That is work, there’s no other way around it.”

WHEN YOUR CELEBRITY ARRIVES

Make sure you have a room ready for them (a private one is ideal) so they can relax and get ready.  If you can fill the room with some of their favorite foods and drinks too, that goes a long way. And finally, have someone on stand-by who can run an errand (I had to find Starbucks coffee at 5am for one star) or handle any last minute details.

Related Post: So You Want To Be On TV:  Is That Casting Call For Real?

Jada Pinkett Smith and @TVProducerDeb 2012
Photo courtesy Debbie Mitchell

WHAT IS  EXPECTED OF A CELEBRITY?

If you are expecting the celebrity of honor to actually do something at the event, it must be discussed and approved before hand with the celebrity representative (publicist/manager).  Doing something includes talking to the press, participating in a television segment (bit) activity, posing for pictures and signing autographs.

Stars want their fans to believe they are people just like us but in the end celebrities really do have certain things in life a whole lot better than us.

What celebrity would you love to meet?

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Coming Up: Chef Nadege Fleurimond Is Back & Ready4Air!

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (TV) | A TV Host Talks About His Best and Worst Interviews

Arise On Screen Host and Film Critic Mike Sargent
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

August 5, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Arise On Screen Host and Film Critic Mike Sargent Photo Credit: Nick Vargas and Debbie Mitchell

Arise On Screen Host and Film Critic Mike Sargent
Photo Credit: Nick Vargas and Debbie Mitchell

First of all, Ready4Air would like to thank Arise On Screen host Mike Sargent for sharing the good, the bad and the ugly aspects of hosting a show. Last week, Mike told us that about the hardest part of being a television host. “Probably the hardest part for me is a combination of giving my insight and commentary, getting my guest’s critiques while being concise and making it all seamless and invisible to the eyes of the viewer.”

As I’ve told you before, being on air talent is a job that looks easy but is harder than you think. Today, Mike Sargent reflects on his best and worst interviews on  Arise On Screen.

Here we go…

Mike, how do you know during a show when the taping is not going well?     

I know things aren’t going right for any variety of reasons. Things can start to feel ‘off,’ but if I’ve properly prepared and I have the proper amount of rest I should be able to pull it off, get back on track.  But again, if for any number of reasons I don’t recover, the mistakes start to grow and I can go from being ‘off ‘ and recovering to being ‘off’ and staying ‘off’. People watching may not notice but I and quite probably my producer and/or director know something’s not quite ‘right’. These mistakes affect my confidence, insecurities seep in, and undo the integrity of what I am trying to achieve.
Arise On Screen Host and Film Critic Mike Sargent Photo Credit: Nick Vargas and Debbie Mitchell

Arise On Screen Host and Film Critic Mike Sargent
Photo Credit: Nick Vargas and Debbie Mitchell

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | A TV Host Breaks Down His Show Prep And Performance

What are a few of the common mistakes that you make during a show taping?

The most common mistakes I’ve made are:
  •  Mispronouncing  a name or word
  •  Forgetting a key point I want to bring up during a discussion of the film. Sometimes this occurs  as I listen to the reactions or reviews of  a co-host. My  mind just blanks on something I spent time preparing and researching.
  • Arise On Screen Host Mike Sargent on set reviewing prompter Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Nick Viagas

    Arise On Screen Host Mike Sargent on set reviewing prompter
    Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Nick Viagas

Sometimes I default to my radio background. When I get nervous or feel slightly insecure I default to certain radio habits like talking too much and not being as concise as I should be with a comment or question. Sometimes I am  distracted or trying to remember something and I don’t have the safety-net of notes to look at as I would when hosting on the radio.
And by far the biggest mistake I can make, and will never do again, is not making sure I got enough sleep the night before. Your mental acuity, alertness, and presence of mind is everything for TV.  When you are not operating at maximum mental capacity it makes it easy for you to make an error and not recover the way you would if you were on your “A”game.
In TV, lessons like these are not just painful, they are also eternal because not only can the rest of the world potentially see or experience your error, but now that error has been captured and archived. The blessing and curse of  performing poorly is that you can go back and watch, and if it’s painful enough you’ll make sure that those kinds of mistakes never happen again.
Arise On Screen Host Mike Sargent with film critics Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi and Jackson Murphy Photo Credit: Nick Vargas and Debbie Mitchell

Arise On Screen Host Mike Sargent with film critics Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi and Jackson Murphy
Photo Credit: Nick Vargas and Debbie Mitchell

Best show to date and your favorite interview?
I’d say one of my best shows was one I did a couple of weeks ago with Jackson Murphy and Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi. I felt the show went very well for variety of reasons. I thought our repartee was good, the conflict of opinions, reviews, and chemistry were good. Chemistry is something that you cannot fake. When it comes naturally, it is an ideal situation,  I felt that show was very strong.
Probably my favorite interview so far was my interview with Chaz Ebert, the widow of  film critic Roger Ebert, when we were at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. I felt connected to her as a subject and felt that connection allowed for a deep interchange.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | On-Air Chemistry: When The Co-Hosts Connect (VIDEO)

Worst interview to date?
Probably my worst interview is one you may never see. I’ve prided myself on my interview skills for the last 15 to 20 years because I’ve always gotten compliments from my subjects about how much they enjoyed the interview. But most of the interviews I’ve done have been for radio.
During any interview, it is a personal goal of mine for each of my subjects to compliment my questions by  saying at some point  “good question” or “that’s a great question”. In television that goal is not always the best goal. In my worst interview to date, a movie junket interview, the guests complimented my questions but the questions were not the best questions for a 3 1/2 minute interview. I didn’t get the answers that I needed to make it a good interview. I didn’t have my executive producer Debbie Mitchell, review and approve the questions and  she hated the interview. It never made it to air.
Television time is very different from radio time. Even though over the years,  I’ve taught and spoken on how to conduct a good interview I had to let go of my pride and be open to the wisdom of my executive producer on and how to ask better questions in  3 1/2 minutes. I realize the limited time is similar to what I do on the red carpet. I have to be  concise, direct, and as my producer likes to say, advance the narrative of the interview with each question, especially, with my first question.
###
Mike, thanks for your honest breakdown of what it’s like to be in the talent  hot seat!

Coming Up: Ready4Air (Music) | Music Makes My Life w/ Afrobeat Musician Femi Kuti 

Deborah J. Mitchell
Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com

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Ready4Air (TV) | A TV Host Breaks Down His Show Prep And Performance

Arise On Screen host and film critic Mike Sargent
Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo

July 29, 2014 | Posted in TV Production | By

Arise On Screen host and film critic Mike Sargent Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo

Arise On Screen host and film critic Mike Sargent.
Photo Credit: Briana Montalvo

Hosting a television show, whether live or taped is no easy task. While on camera, an on-air personality is expected to look good, impart information, and be engaging all at the same time–every single time. But there are days when all three things do not line up. If the show is live, then the viewing audience gets to see the flubs unfold in real time. However, if a show is taped many of the mistakes can be smoothed out and corrected in post-production. You would be amazed at the “magic” that can happen with editing in post-production.

Arise On Screen control room Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Arise On Screen control room. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

I’ve been working with Arise On Screen host and film critic Mike Sargent over the last seven months as he has made the transition from radio personality to television personality. Every week, his goal is to bring his “A” game to the taping and avoid mistakes. Some weeks are harder than others. I asked Mike to honestly discuss the challenges of being on top of his performance every week.

Arise On Screen host Mike Sargent Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Arise On Screen host Mike Sargent.
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Mike, tell me the hardest part of sitting in the host seat. Probably the hardest part for me is a combination of giving my insight and commentary, getting my guest’s critiques while being concise, and making it all seamless and invisible to the eyes of the viewer.

How important is it for you to prepare and what do you do to prepare for an Arise On Screen taping? I am learning more and more that you can never be over-prepared in TV. After last week’s experience where I made several errors during taping, I’m rethinking how I might go about breaking down my preparation for the show. Here’s basically what I do now:

  • The first stage, of course, is seeing the movies. I generally don’t read up too much on a movie prior to seeing it. I do most of my research after. This can get to be a lot when we’re reviewing six movies. However, the research allows me to speak about the movies effortlessly. Giving my opinion is the easy part, but to give out information and insight as to the process or behind-the-scenes (as I say in the introduction of the show), it is essential for me to read as much as I can and have as much background on the film and filmmakers before each segment.
  • The second thing is the actual writing of the rough draft of the show script. Writing it allows me to have a sense of the flow of the show and how one film in a segment can relate to the other or contrast. During the process of the scriptwriting, I’m also looking at clips, EPK materials, interviews, and trailers. After going through all this, I get a sense of how the film has been marketed and what people are expecting, which can influence how I will craft my review.
  • The third thing is an amazing tool I learned from my executive producer, Debbie Mitchell, which is getting the guest critic’s talking points about each film. That allows me to not only get a sense of what they think of the film, but what their sensibility is in reviewing it. This is key in keeping the conversation lively, interesting, and a way to spot potential conflict of opinions between the critics and myself, which makes for good TV. In our production meeting day of air, we generally go over what additional movies and specific scenes we may reference during our review. This also influences how I may set up certain questions for my co-hosts.
Arise On Screen production meeting Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Arise On Screen production meeting.
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

  • The fourth thing is just familiarizing myself on day of air with all of the teleprompter material, including running through the script in the teleprompter prior to going on set.
  • Finally, just prior to going on set, I review my notes and talking points.

Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | TV Hosting 101: Driving A Segment and Interviewing Guests

How do you know during a show taping when it is not going well? I know when things aren’t going well, when I make a mistake like stumbling or mispronouncing a name or sometimes it is a prompter issue. The prompter may be rolling slowly or is in the wrong place. I consider this a technical mistake. Debbie reminds me that it is important to reread and review the show script ahead of tape day. As a host, you must be focused since you are juggling a number of balls and a number of distractions can come at anytime. It can range anywhere from my being unable to hear communication through my IFB earpiece to being distracted by something on the set that’s going on during the show. Distractions come in all forms, including an internal distraction over a mistake or error made or from something else that may have happened prior to the show earlier that day or during the week. If something is not going right during the show, I get an overall feeling. I may know that the co-host chemistry is not quite right or that I didn’t get the response I expected, but I have to keep the show moving. As show host, I set goals for myself, for the segment, and for what I would  like to get out of my co-hosts. If mistakes occur, ideally, I would  like to be able to keep the show on track, but sometimes (as in the case of last week) I don’t recover the way I want to. It is easy to feel insecure at this moment. Related Post: Ready4Air (TV) | On-Air Chemistry: When The Co-Hosts Connect (VIDEO)

Arise On Screen host Mike Sargent and film critics Justine Browning and Matt Donato Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

Arise On Screen host Mike Sargent and film critics Justine Browning and Matt Donato
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

After a show is taped and you watch it, what do you look for when critiquing yourself? In critiquing myself, the main things I look for are:

  • How I look on on-air–my clothing, hair, how I’m positioned in the chair, etc.
  • Whether I am engaging my hosts and at the same time playing to the camera when I need to.
  • How I sound and come across. Have I made the points I wanted to make? Have I gotten the most I could out of the segment and co-hosts?
  • Do I repeat a phrase too often, such as “I think,” “in my opinion,” or “like,”? Do I repeatedly use words like “interesting” as a opposed to a more descriptive phrase or sentence?
  • When I stand back and look at the show as a whole, I ask myself if I would continue watching and what have I gotten out of the show as a viewer.

### Coming Up: Mike Reveals His Best and Worst Interviews

Deborah J. Mitchell
Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com

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