Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Bone Broth: America’s Powerful New Superfood (REPOST)

veggiesoup

September 4, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

bone broth

Mushroom soup made with bone broth.
Photo credit: Ariane Resnick

First published on March 13, 2015

By Ariane Resnick

Bone broth is a fairly new health trend, but it is one of humanity’s oldest foods. For as long as we have been cooking meat, we’ve been boiling the bones with water afterward. While there are many health benefits of well-sourced animal products, there are even more from bone broth. Rich in collagen, gelatin, amino acids, CLA, and Omega 3, and useful for healing ailments including inflammation, sports injury, cellulite, leaky gut, and IBS, the broth of grass-fed and pasture-raised organic animal bones is America’s powerful new superfood.

Often confused with soup stock, bone broth is the result of boiling animal bones with water for far longer than one would for stock, and without the need for a bouquet garni. With many hours of simmering, the taste and health benefits of onions or carrots would be long since lost, though you can certainly add them after. You need only to add a small amount of salt and some apple cider vinegar to help pull the minerals out of the bones, in addition to bones and water.

If the process sounds familiar to you, you may already be familiar with an ethnic version of bone broth. In Jewish culture, long-boiled chicken soup is a common cure for colds and lovingly referred to as “Jewish penicillin.” Asian cultures consume “long-life broth” to promote longevity, and nearly every native group worldwide has their version. However, it is only in the past year or two that bone broth has gained popularity in America, fueled both by the Paleo diet movement and the opening of bone broth cafes in major cities.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | The Almonds of Provence

bone broth

Vegetable soup made with bone broth.
Photo credit: Ariane Resnick

The benefits of bone broth are manifold, but they can only be obtained from properly sourced bones. If you boil factory-farmed conventional bones, you will be concentrating the pesticides the animals are fed, the hormones and antibiotics they’re given, and all of their inflammatory conditions. Bone broth is only useful if made with grass-fed, pasture-raised, and organic bones. That said, all types of bones are good for broth, from chicken carcasses to pig’s feet to lamb shanks. You can use one, or a mix, and should choose whichever animal’s flavor you most prefer. You can use either leftover cooked bones from a meal you’ve made, or buy them specifically to make broth.

My ratio for making bone broth is a simple one: 1 pound of bones to 1 quart of water, with 1 teaspoon of salt and ½ tablespoon of cider vinegar. If you are using raw bones, the taste will be improved by browning them first in the pot, but that isn’t necessary. Bone broth is cooked for 2-3 hours in a pressure cooker, 12-24 hours on the stovetop, or 24-48 hours in a slow cooker. After simmering for the right duration of time for your cooking method, cool and strain out the bones. You can increase the ratio to make any amount of broth, and it freezes very well; make sure to chill it thoroughly first. The fat that collects on top once the broth is cold is nutrient-rich and can replace butter or oil in other recipes. It can be used as a warming drink, a base for soups, or to replace water when cooking grains or legumes. I have 50 recipes for everything from stews to tonics using bone broth in my upcoming book, The Bone Broth Miracle, which will be released late this spring by Skyhorse Publishing. However you choose to use it, bone broth is a simple, delicious tool for wellness.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Going Vegan Is A Joy With A Farm-To-Table Menu

Ariane Resnick

Chef Ariane Resnick
Photo credit: Chris Bacarella Photography

Ariane Resnick is a private chef and certified nutritionist who specializes in organic farm-to-table cuisine and creates indulgent, seemingly “normal” food out of impeccably clean, whole food ingredients. She has cooked for celebrities that include Gwyneth Paltrow, Chris Martin, Matt Groening, Lisa Edelstein, and Jeff Franklin, and has been featured in media such as Well + Good NYC, In Style, Star, Goop.com, food.com, Huffington Post, Refinery29.com, Muscle & Fitness, Men’s Fitness, and Food Network’s Chopped. She is also a survivor of late stage Lyme Disease and chemical poisoning, and recovered holistically from both. When not crafting beautifully presented tasty dishes that accommodate just about any dietary restriction, Resnick consults clients and chefs on wellness and nutrition, and provides hands-on instruction for simple ways to cook more healthfully. Her first book, The Bone Broth Miracle, will be released late this spring by Skyhorse Publishing.

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Thanks, Ariane!

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) The British Virgin Islands: A New Fashion Destination

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell – Graphic Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Americans’ Taste For Food Is Changing

A bowl of octopus ramenPhoto Credit: bigbirdz via Creative Commons

July 17, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

A bowl of octopus ramenPhoto Credit: bigbirdz via Creative Commons

A bowl of octopus ramen
Photo Credit: bigbirdz via Creative Commons

By Alexis Trass Walker

Americans’ taste for food is changing.

Most of us–a whopping 88 percent–say that our palettes are more adventurous. Seventy-four percent of us say that we are willing to try a food for the first time.

Like many Americans, I grew up with a meat-and-potatoes diet that included standard produce like green beans and corn and apples and bananas. My family of six didn’t go out to eat very often, so there were few opportunities to venture outside of that diet. I was, let’s just euphemistically say, culinarily close minded.

Then I moved to Los Angeles in my mid-20s. All of a sudden, I was thrown into a world where people were buying pluots as a matter of course and regularly eating Thai food (which I adamantly refused to try when a coworker made that as a lunch suggestion). However, I saw that I’d have to get on board with trying new foods if I wanted to socialize with my friends.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | A French Summer Sunday Lunch For 6

I’m not the only one who has chosen to make my palette more daring. According to a survey of 1,000 Americans for CPK.com, 74 percent say they are more willing to try a food for the first time than ever before. Fifty-nine percent of Americans describe their attitude towards food today as “open minded,” while 36 percent call it “experimental” and 32 percent consider themselves “adventurous.”

I would use all of the above-mentioned words to describe my food attitude. By the time I moved away from California, I was regularly eating foods I wouldn’t have dreamed of touching when I was younger. In fact, 34 percent of survey respondents admit they were not willing to try new foods when they were younger, but 77 percent say they are prepared to try new, exotic, or unusual foods and combinations today. Ethiopian and Oaxacan cuisine, as well as Korean barbecue, are just a few of my California favorites.

“Over time, as we become exposed to different cultures and people in our lives who have their own unique tastes, we find that people become more willing to open up their mind and their palette to new things,” said Brian Sullivan, head chef for California Pizza Kitchen. “We really are a global culture.”

Broccoli, lobster, and spinach top the list of ingredients that people are willing to try at least once, followed by mango and herbs such as cilantro, sage, thyme, dill, and tarragon. Other items that get a first chance include snap peas, eggplant, sweet potatoes, and kiwi.

Leafy vegetables, exotic fruits, and ancient grains that are hard to pronounce (quinoa, anyone?) used to be non-standard fare for many Americans growing up. So who encourages people to try new things? Among the greatest influences, 45 percent say a partner or spouse turned them on to different foods. Forty percent think friends helped them, and 21 percent owe it to other family members. Still, 44 percent say they just want to try new things.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | “No Wing Left Behind”: Crawl’in For Chicken Wings Through Brooklyn

Is there anything unusual on your list of foods to try at least once? Sixteen percent of respondents said fried grasshoppers. Fifteen percent picked Rocky Mountain oysters, also known as deep-fried bull, pig, or sheep testicles. As far as an unusual food, I have tried chicken hearts. I didn’t hate it, but I didn’t enjoy it, either. I’m glad I gave it a shot, though, because it showed me how much more open minded I had become.

Americans have become a more demanding bunch. We dine out an average of three times a month, and we’re not interested in standard fare. Fifty-two percent of survey respondents said they expect an interesting combination of foods, and 40 percent expect a food “adventure”–or at least the option to try new things. Just last week, my sister invited me out to dinner, and neither of us were interested in the usual. She suggested a Vietnamese restaurant and I readily agreed. I’ve had many types of Asian food, but never Vietnamese. I will be going back for more.

California Pizza Kitchens across the country offer a Menu Adventure Guarantee, encouraging patrons to try something new or they will replace it with their regular favorite. Their California-style cuisine comes in many globally-inspired, bold flavor combinations.

“With every mouthful, we want people to be open try new flavors and interesting combinations. They’ll definitely be surprised by what works together,” said Brian Sullivan. “Everyone’s food experience should be a wonderful global adventure.”

Since I have nothing to lose, I guess I’ll have to make my way to the nearest California Pizza Kitchen and try a new specialty pizza. My mouth is watering already!

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Bone Broth: America’s Powerful New Superfood

Here’s a list of the top 20 foods people tried as an adult that they never tried growing up:

1. Lobster
2. Avocado
3. Hot peppers (jalapeno, ghost chili pepper, habanero, etc.)
4. Asparagus/Mango
5. Kiwi
6. Broccoli
7. Eggplant
8. Strong cheeses (gorgonzola/blue cheese, taleggio, Camembert, etc.)
9. Exotic spices (curry, turmeric, saffron, etc.)
10. Herbs (cilantro, sage, thyme, dill weed, tarragon, etc.)
11. Spinach
12. Kale
13. Artichoke
14. Brussels Sprouts
15. Couscous
16. Condiments from other countries/cultures (chimichurri, sriracha, hoisin, etc.)
17. Romaine lettuce
18. Summer squash (zucchini, patty pan, crookneck, etc.)
19. Collard greens
20. Cabbage

What about you? What food adventures have you been on lately?

Alexis Trass Walker

Alexis Trass Walker

Alexis Trass Walker is a freelance writer and copy editor who blogs about grammar and other things at alexistrasswalker.com. Connect with her on Twitter @alexistrass.

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) | Lights-Camera-Jackson on what we learned from Comic-Con 2015

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | #Repost-Summer Memories From The Farmers Market

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July 3, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

This post was first published on September 26, 2014. 
 
With summer officially over, I’m thinking about all the great things about the season that I will miss. Top on the list is the bounty from a farmers market. My last visit to a farmers market was Labor Day weekend during a visit to Milford, Pennsylvania. Producer and fellow food blogger Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Madhausfrau was planning a weekend of foodie fun, and the farmers market was ripe for finding a few of the things we needed while lending our support. The Milford Farmers Market is a cozy market where local farmers sell fresh fruits, vegetables, and cooked and baked goods. Today, we take a look at what makes a farmers market summer so tasty.
 
 
Milford's green market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
Milford's green market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
Milford's green market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
Milford's green market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
Milford's green market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates


Milford's green market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
Milford's green market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
According to the Department of Agriculture, there are more than 8,000 farmers markets nationwide (representing something like 50,000 farmers). In New York, the close to 140 markets close right before Thanksgiving, however, there are a little more than 50 that remain open year-round. So, no worries—the end of summer does not always mean the end of fresh produce. If you get a chance, stop by your neighborhood farmers market. If you are lucky, you might even see a bunny. Thanks, Milford Farmers Market!
 
To read about our fun foodie weekend in Milford, check out Lora’s post here at Diary of A Mad Hausfrau.

Have a great weekend!

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Milford Farmers Market. Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 
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Coming Up: Interview With Gina Prince-Bythewood
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | #Repost-Chef Helen Mirren Fights Over Food In ‘The Hundred-Foot Journey’

DreamWorks Pictures’ THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY

July 1, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues, Film | By

 

 Manish Dayal and Helen Mirren, The Hundred-Foot Journey

Manish Dayal and Helen Mirren, The Hundred-Foot Journey

This post was first published on July 4, 2014.

Two of my favorites things are getting together on the big screen: food and actress Helen Mirren. Mirren, 68, is putting on her chef’s hat in the new movie The Hundred-Foot Journey where she plays the top chef of Le Saule Pleureur, a Michelin-starred, classical French restaurant in the South of France (Okay, three of my favorite things are getting together. LOL!). Mirren’s character, Madame Mally–described as “a chilly chef proprietress”–has major problems when a new restaurant opens a hundred feet from her establishment.

Related Post: Foodie Friday: Can You Tell When A Dish Is Prepared By A Woman Chef? (VIDEO)

The Hundred-Foot Journey

The Hundred-Foot Journey

The owner of the new restaurant, Hassan Kadam (Manish Dayal), is a culinary ingénue who was displaced, along with his family, from their native India.

Oprah Winfrey, Producer & Actress Helen Mirren-The Hundred-Foot Journey

Producer Oprah Winfrey and actress Helen Mirren, The Hundred-Foot Journey

The movie The Hundred-Foot Journey is based on the bestselling book of the same name by Richard C. Morais. The film is produced by Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey, who you may remember working together in The Color Purple, Winfrey’s first big screen acting venture.

Related Food: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) : Food Films Take Over The Box Office

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a bad movie with Oscar-winner Helen Mirren. A few of my favorites include, The Queen, Red, Red 2, The Debt, and Hitchcock, and I am definitely looking forward to this one. Can the two culinary neighbors find a recipe to get along? Speaking of recipes, below is one for Gratin Dauphinois courtesy of DreamWorks Pictures’ The Hundred-Foot Journey.

To see more great food, check out the movie when it opens nationwide on August 8.

Gratin_dauphinois

Ingredients 

  • 1.5 L / 1 1/2 qt milk
  • Freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 pc bouquet garni
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 165 mL . 5 1/2 oz heavy cream
  • 1.2 kg / 2 1/2 lbs potatoes, firm-fleshed
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 120 g/4 oz grated Gruyere cheese
  • Unsalted butter, softened for gratin dish
  • Salt and pepper
Method:
  • Preheat the oven to 190 C (380 F).
  • Coat a deep, ovenproof dish with softened butter and reserve in the refrigerator.
  • Combine the milk, freshly grated nutmeg, bouquet garni, and garlic in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Bring the liquid to a boil, remove it from the heat, and leave it to infuse for five minutes.
  • Meanwhile, wash and peel potatoes and slice them thinly, about 1/8” / 3 mm. Do not rinse the potatoes as the starch is needed.
  • Layer the potato slices tightly in the buttered dish and season each new layer with salt and pepper.
  • Stir the cream into the hot milk then pour through a fine mesh sieve onto the potatoes. Let rest for one to two minutes. The potatoes will absorb the liquid and the level will decrease. Top up with the remaining liquid. Repeat until all the milk mixture is used. Season the top and sprinkle generously with grated cheese. Cover the dish with a parchment paper and foil.
  • Place it in the oven to cook for one hour or until the potatoes are easily pierced with a knife.
  • Remove the foil and parchment paper and return the dish to the oven to brown until the surface is golden.
  • Remove from the oven and let rest for five to 10 minutes before serving.
Enjoy!
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Coming Up: Ready4Air (Brands and Bloggers) | Learn More About Bloggers Taking A Press Trip 
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

 

 

 

 

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | A French Summer Sunday Lunch For 6

Cold Melon Soup with Basil

June 19, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

The countryside in Fanes, Languedoc-Roussillon, FrancePhoto Credit:

A countryside scene in the Languedoc-Roussillon region of France
Photo Credit: Jorge Franganillo via Creative Commons

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

First published on Ginger and Nutmeg

On July 19, 2012

Don’t let your mother tell you that the Internet is a scary place! I have met so many interesting people via Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest that I have decided to start a guest blog so they can share their stories. Voila:

Aidan Larson is an American mom of three navigating her way through life in France and writing about it on her blog, Conjugating Irregular Verbs. She writes from her dining room table in the south of France in between motherhood, French lessons, and perfecting her oeuf en croute. If you want to read more from Aidan, she can be found on her blog or on Twitter @aidan_larson.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | What Is A Far Breton From Brittany, France?

French Summer Sunday Lunch for 6

We are smack dab in the middle of summer. It’s my favorite season of the year, especially here in the south of France where the produce is tantalizingly displayed at weekly markets all over the region. This is the time of year that could make even the most vegaphobic person fall for a green bean, squash flower, or misshapen tomato. Endless possibilities for creating fresh, cool, and perfectly filling summer lunch dishes abound. There really aren’t enough Sunday midis to make all the things I want to make. I jot down notes, tear out recipes, and plan menus while greedily dreaming of long lunches around the table in the dappled sunshine of the terrace.

When I thought of what I’d like to share with you, I picked some of my favorite easy summer dishes and made you a typical French Sunday lunch menu. It’s something you would be served at any southern French maison during the summer, probably outside under a wisteria-laden pergola or rush-covered terrace. It would also make a great pique-nique lunch to enjoy under the shade of a plane tree while you wait for the speeding cyclists of the Tour de France to whiz by.

The French love to serve appetizers and desserts in small shot glasses, called verrines. They make for pretty portions and are fun to dip your small teaspoon into. The soup and white chocolate mousse would be perfect served this way rather than family style. You can fill the glasses ahead of time and keep them refrigerated until ready to serve.

Everything can be made ahead, so it is an easy menu for entertaining. You can, of course, prepare the tomato and crab tart up to the point of cooking and then put it in the oven while the soup is served if you want it to be piping hot. If not, it’s just as good at room temperature or even refrigerator cold–eaten like morning pizza, right out of your hand. (The French would never eat it this way, but what they don’t know won’t hurt them.)

Cold Melon Soup with Basil
Tarte à la Tomate with Crab
Summer Cheese Trio
White Chocolate Mousse with Frozen Raspberries
Chilled Rosé for the grownups and water with mint syrup for the children

 

Cold Melon Soup with Basil

Cold Melon Soup with Basil

Cold Melon Soup with Basil

So simple, so fresh and so summer. A must-try recipe.

Recipe type: Appetizer
Prep time: 15 mins. Cook time: 15 mins. Total time: 30 mins
Serves: 6-8

Ingredients:

1 large Charentais melon or cantaloupe, ripe and perfectly sweet
1 tablespoon lime juice
6 leaves fresh basil, plus extra for garnish
1-2 tablespoons water, as required
1-2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions:

Cut the melon in half. Remove the seeds and peel. Cut into rough chunks and place in a glass blender. Add in the lime juice, basil leaves, and olive oil. Blitz in the blender until smooth. Pour into shot glasses and chill until ready to serve. Crack over some pepper and a small basil leaf to garnish just before serving.

 

Tarte a la Tomate with Crab

Tarte à la Tomate with Crab

Tarte à la Tomate with Crab

An excellent lunchtime dish and one that impresses your guests every time. Serve it with a simply dressed green salad of lettuce leaves, finely sliced scallions, green and white parts, and a tablespoon of drained capers.

Recipe type: Main dish, light lunch. Cuisine: French
Prep time: 15 mins. Cook time: 25 mins. Total time: 40 mins.
Serves: 6-8

Note: Even if you do not like Dijon, do not skip this step. It gives a depth of flavor.
Note: You can prepare the tart and leave in the fridge for up to a half-hour before cooking. Any longer and your crust will get soggy.

Ingredients:

1 large tomato (choose from the tempting market fresh varieties)
1 small red onion, finely sliced lengthwise
1-2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
½ cup Cantal entre deux cheese from the Auvergne region of France or an aged white cheddar
170g (6oz) canned crabmeat in brine
1 large egg, lightly beaten
150ml (3/4 cup) light cream

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 180 degrees C/350 degrees F/GM6.
One prepared savory pastry crust (you can make it if you like, but I don’t bother). Place the pastry in a tart pan, crimping the top edges. Fork the bottom lightly and spread with a tablespoon or more of the Dijon mustard. Thickly grate over a layer of the cheese to cover the mustard. Meanwhile, slice your red onion and gently cook it in olive oil over low heat until just soft but not browned. Drain the canned crab. Layer the softened onion and crab over the grated cheese. Slice your tomatoes into small rounds and place in a circular arrangement over the rest. Beat the egg with the cream and pour over the top. Grate over some more cheese to cover and you’re done. Bake for 25 minutes in the oven.

 

Summer Cheese Trio

Summer Cheese Trio

Summer Cheese Trio

The cheese course is a luncheon staple here in France, but the trick is not to serve too many choices or too much of each. Pick three different cheeses and serve a small wedge of each on a wooden cutting board. Some good ones to try would be a firm, ripe bleu d’Auvergne; a low-fat Tomme de Savoie made from cow’s milk; and a Pélardon, goat’s cheese from our Languedoc region.

 

White Chocolate Mousse

White Chocolate Mousse with Frozen Raspberries

White Chocolate Mousse with Frozen Raspberries

When ready to serve, add a couple of frozen raspberries to the top of each glass. Or you could mix your raspberries in a couple of tablespoons of Grand Marnier if you like before topping each.

Recipe type: Dessert
Prep time: 10 mins. Cook time: 2 hours. Total time: 2 hours 10 mins.
Serves: 6

Ingredients:

180g (7oz) white chocolate
300 ml (1⅓ cup) whipped cream, I use liquid and beat it with the mixer
1 cup frozen raspberries
2 tablespoons Grand Marnier, if desired

Instructions:

Melt chocolate in the microwave or bain-marie (double boiler). Beat the cream with a handheld mixer or similar utensil. Mix the melted chocolate into the whipped cream, folding it gently. Pour into shot glasses or small wine glasses and refrigerate for two hours.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | The Almonds of Provence

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, Creative Writer at Ginger and Nutmeg /Director of Perfectly Provence Photo Credit:

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, Creative Writer at Ginger and Nutmeg/Director of Perfectly Provence
Photo Credit: Andrew Abbott

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) ‘Jurassic World’ And ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ Contribute To Universal Domination

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air(Culinary Cues) | “Sip, Suck, Swirl, and Swallow”: Wine Tasting Days and Nights

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June 12, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

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House of Mandela Wines
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

When it comes to wine, I am always a student eager to learn more. The line “sip, suck, swirl and swallow” is one I picked up as a kid watching an episode of The Odd Couple where finicky sophisticate Felix Unger, played by Tony Randall, was giving his slovenly roommate Oscar Madison, played by actor Jack Klugman, a lesson in wine tasting. It’s hilarious, and  the mantra has stuck with me ever since.

Related Post: #TBT | Foodie Friday | Wines And Spirits – Drinks On Me!

IMG_3766-e1433708706770-1024x768

Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

I have actually had a chance to put the mantra to good use at a few New York City wine events over the last few months, starting with May’s Wine & Spirits Presents a Tasting and Benefit for New York/New Jersey Baykeeper. Held at the Metropolitan Pavilion in Manhattan, the night was called “Top Of The List-NYC.” The Metropolitan Pavilion is a cavernous space that housed more than 100 wineries pouring their wines, which are considered the most popular wines in restaurants from Wine & Spirits magazine’s 2015 restaurant poll. The wines were arranged by style from lightest to richest. There were tables of white wine, sparkling wine, red wines, and rose. Truth be told, I am partial to white wines, Pinot Grigio, and sparkling wines, including Prosecco and Champagne.

collage 11

Wine & Spirits Presents a Tasting and Benefit for New York/New Jersey Baykeeper
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

 

The whites included crisp whites and rich whites while the roses and reds included Pinot Noir, Iberian red, Zinfandel and Italian red. I ended up spending quite a bit of time at a table of red wines–Joel Gott 2013, Joel Gott 815 Cabernet Sauvignon, 2011 Joel Gott Napa Valley, Gott 11 Cabernet Sauvignon–where I practiced the sip, suck, swirl, and swallow technique. The reds were a little bitter for me but conveniently stationed next to a delicious wheel of Crown Finish Caves white cheddar cheese. The cheese was served with bite-sized toasted raisin bread and tasted exceptionally great since I was drinking on an empt y stomach. After a few trips around the room sipping more sparkling wines, my head started spinning and this lightweight decided to head home.

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Tukwini Mandela, granddaughter of the late Nelson Mandela, with Arise Review producer Jacqui Farmer at Madiba Harlem, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

The great thing about wine is that there is a perfect one for every meal. In April, Arise Review producer Jacquie Farmer and I joined Tukwini Mandela, granddaughter of the late Nelson Mandela, for a luncheon. The luncheon at Madiba Harlem was for the launch of 2015 The House of Mandela Wines, the newest addition to the family’s wine business. Tukwini was only 19 when her famous grandfather, known as the first black president of South Africa, was released from prison after being jailed for 27 years. Mandela–who was 79 at the time of his release–was imprisoned for working to tear down South Africa’s apartheid regime.

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Tukwini Mandela, granddaughter of the late Nelson Mandela, at Madiba Harlem, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Today, Tukwini and her mother Makaziwe Mandela, the daughter of Nelson Mandela, are heading up the family wine business. Tukwini joined us for lunch where she introduced us to their newest labels in the collection, including House Of Mandela Deep River Chenin/Chardonnay, Thembu Sauvignon Blanc, House Of Mandela Royal Reserve Shiraz, and House Of Mandela Deep River Cab/Merlot. She described the differences in how each wine is made, and in an interview with BET.com, Tukwini explained the Mandela family’s business objective, “We wanted to work with family-owned wineries, number one. We wanted to work with wineries that treated their employees with dignity and respect. We wanted wineries that respected the biodiversity of South Africa and worked to maintain the biodiversity for our future generations.”

 

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(Clockwise from top left): House of Mandela Wines; Mozambique prawns peri peri with yellow rice and raisins; pap and leis and borrowers (white cornmeal with lamb chops and farm sausage); beet salad with red wine vinegar; oxtail and samp
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Related Post: Foodie Friday: JBF Chefs & Champagne……

While Jacqui, having lived in South Africa, was familiar with several of the dishes, the luncheon menu was new to me. It included Safari Platter-Biltong Droerwors with mixed nuts and fried fruits, beet salad with red wine vinegar, Mozambique prawns peri peri with yellow rice and raisins, pap and vleis and boerewors (white cornmeal with lamb chops and farm sausage), and oxtail and samp. We also had Malva pudding for dessert.

 

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Drinking The Aquarius at the Iconoclast Dinner Experience at the James Beard House, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

And while a good wine can be the perfect complement to any dish, I always enjoy the simplicity of a solid cocktail.  That’s exactly what I got when I went to the Iconoclast Dinner Experience at the James Beard House on June 6. The event was an evening of food, wine, and spirits icons who had gathered to raise scholarship funds to benefit the Dr. Lezli Levene Harvell Scholarship for International Students at Spelman College. Chef icons included host Chef Joe “JJ” Johnson and spirits professional Colin Asare-Appiah, the national training manager at Bacardi, one of the sponsors of the event. The press reception in the backyard of the James Beard House was the backdrop to a beautiful, cool Saturday evening, and there was a drink for everyone. While I didn’t stay for dinner, I filled up at the bar, tasting a little of everything.

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The Iconoclast Dinner Experience at the James Beard House, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Cocktails featured for the evening included The Pearl Martini, made with ‪#‎GreyGooseVodka‬ with “Sea Spray” Noilly Prat Vermouth, The Green River made with Bombay Sapphire Gin, Martini Bianco Summer Syrup topped with Martini Prosecco, and finally, my favorite drink of the afternoon, The Aquarius made with St. Germaine, ‎Bacardi rum‬ and pineapple juice and lime. Yum to them all!

Now, back to the wine tasting. I’m still learning to appreciate the different notes of wine and will always have fun using my mantra, “sip, suck, swirl, and swallow,” but if you really want to learn the right way to taste wine, check out winemag.com for real tips on enjoying that glass.

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) A French summer Sunday lunch for six

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Eating And Tweeting: Coordinating A Fantastic Food Crawl

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June 5, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

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Downtown Brooklyn Wing Crawl coordinated by Singing Chef Jackie Gordon and Margaret Chen
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

A couple of weeks ago, I had my first food crawl adventure when I joined a group of foodies on a trek through Brooklyn chasing down all the best chicken wings fit to eat. Our crew traveled over 10 miles and tasted a variety of wings from nine different restaurants from Clinton Hill to Gowanus, Brooklyn. Our group–a mix of men and women–came together at the hands of Singing Chef Jackie Gordon and food blogger Margaret Chen of SavorySweetLiving.

Our mantra for the day was “No wing left behind.” And trust me, we didn’t leave anything behind. The day was filled with eating, tweeting, and photographing food as we crawled.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | “No Wing Left Behind”: Crawl’in For Chicken Wings Through Brooklyn

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Wingers at Downtown Brooklyn Chicken Wing Crawl, May 17, 2015
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates
Photo Courtesy Margaret Chen

 

A few days after the event, I asked veteran food crawl coordinators Jackie and Margaret what goes into the planning of a successful crawl. Jackie explained that the right group of people is key. “You have to have like-minded people, so it’s important to know who you’re inviting ahead of time. No whiners and no troublemakers.” Well, our group was a happy one.

“Be careful of people with allergies or food considerations. That can be challenging. Also, people who are not easygoing or who other people don’t like. You have to spend the whole day with these people and you don’t want drama. You have to stay in communication beforehand, and make sure participants have all the information. You need a hashtag to connect them.” The hashtag for our wing crawl was #wingingitbk.

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Wangs, Korean BBQ Wings
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Margaret added that even though our crawl theme was chicken wings, there was room to be a little flexible. “Coming up with a theme is always a good idea when planning a food crawl. In this case, we concentrated on wings; even though we did sidetrack a little, we stuck to the theme. I’ve done a much looser and general-theme crawl before where we have an idea of all the places we want to visit. We mapped out the proximity of these places, but we were also flexible enough to venture off to other locations that may not be planned at the time. However, that was with a much smaller group. Sticking to planned places is a better idea for a large group.”

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Winger Aaron chowing down at Downtown Brooklyn Wing Crawl
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Jackie also explained why having a theme is important: “Pick a popular theme so people will want to come.”

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Ganso, Yuzu Kosho wings in “secret” fish sauce
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

 

Both ladies agreed that proximity is important. Restaurants shouldn’t be too far from one another. Walking distance is good in order to avoid taking public transportation. Jackie explained the strategy behind the crawl. “We do crawls by food or area. Pick the best places. We hate total duds. Go to Facebook and Twitter and ask food lovers and food bloggers where they would go. I usually ask the hive mind. I look at places that are popular on Instagram. Figure out if you need to call restaurants ahead by the timing. We don’t usually do this, but it’s something to consider. Make sure they are open.”

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PokPok, Ike’s Fish Sauce Wings
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Margaret stressed the importance of location, location, location. “Location is also important unless you plan to take transportation. It’s best to stay within a specific area or borough. For example, I’ve planned a few Chinese food crawls in Flushing, Chinatown, where most of the places are within close proximity of each other, which makes it easier for the group. Picking out the best in the area (either by personal experience or recommendation) is also very important, so do your research. Knowing the best places is key to a successful crawl because you don’t want the attendees to be disappointed by the places they visit.”

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Saying Goodbye To Legendary Fries

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PokPok, Ike’s Fish Sauce Wings
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

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PokPok, Ike’s Fish Sauce Wings
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Finally, if you aren’t coordinating a food crawl but plan to attend one, here are a couple of quick tips from Margaret on how to best prepare for the food fest. “The three things to consider and plan for when attending a food crawl are to be sure you’re wearing comfortable shoes and loose-fitting clothes, especially if you’ll be walking very far and eating in lots of places. If the crawl is not prepaid, then you should bring small bills to chip in. I always like to document the places by taking pictures and notes in case you want to go back with friends and family, so bring a camera or notepad.”

So, there you have it–the makings of a fantastic food crawl. Grab your camera, notepad, and wet wipes and start crawling!

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Lifestyle) Who are America’s most unique celebrities?

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Beyond The Stew: Ireland Is A Destination For Foodies

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May 15, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

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Clockwise from top left: View in the Connemara, Muckross House, Slea Head Dingle Peninsula, and Kylemore Abbey
All photos by Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

 

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

When the sun shines (between rain showers) in Ireland, this destination clearly deserves its moniker “Emerald Isle.” The grass literally sparkles, Irish eyes twinkle, and every available patio chair is taken.

Ireland has long been attractive to golfers, gardeners, and Guinness lovers. Now, it is also a destination for global foodies who have recognized the exceptional blend of the local terroir and creative cuisine. With nine Michelin-starred restaurants in the Republic of Ireland, there is much more to the Irish food scene than traditional stew.

The Irish potato famine struck in the summer of 1845, triggered by a fungus that traveled from Mexico to Ireland. At harvest time, distraught farmers shed tears at the sight of Ireland’s primary food staple rotting in their fields. A planted acre of potatoes would typically feed a family for a year, making the choice of cultivating potatoes over grain an obvious one. These devastating scenes resulted in a human disaster in a country where the population’s diet was highly dependent on the starchy spuds.

It was a dark decade in Irish history. An estimated one million people died, and double that number emigrated to other countries around the world. Even today, it would be difficult to find a family in Ireland untouched in some manner by the potato famine. That may be the reason that the country is only now on the cusp of a food revolution.

“In the last 15 years, small artisanal producers have blossomed, and innovation in the food production sector has increased,” says Margaret Jeffares, founder of Good Food Ireland.

“Local is simply not good enough,” according to Ed Cooney, executive chef at Dublin’s five-star Merrion Hotel where he serves Irish artisanal products such as the hotel’s balsamic apple cider vinegar produced by Llewellyns Orchard.

Michelin-starred chef Ross Lewis, the owner of Chapter One restaurant in Dublin, says there was always a strong agricultural and industrial food scene in the country. However, there was no awareness (or interest) of how to make the best use of these primary products. Lewis feels that all began to change in the 1970s with a handful of pioneering producers.

The math is easy: Good food + great culture = tourists.

In the past few months, I have worked with Mary Baskin at the Vagabond International to develop the itinerary for a unique “Explore Ireland Tour” from September 26–October 3, 2015. The weeklong tour will take you from Dublin to the Wild Atlantic Way (WAW), the spectacular west coast of Ireland. Along the route, you will get a chance to experience some Irish culture, taste local artisanal foods, and enjoy the dazzling scenery.

The Explore Ireland Tour begins and ends in Dublin with the detailed itinerary for the trip available here. Book your trip now as there is limited spoke on this bespoke Explore Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way tour.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Greece: A Destination For Foodies

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott, creative writer at Ginger and Nutmeg/Director of Perfectly Provence
Photo Credit: Andrew Abbott

With her camera and laptop nearby, Carolyne is living proof that there is no such thing as a single career anymore. She began her working life as an equity stock trader and then moved to commercial real estate and project management. She has entered the world of freelance writing and social media consulting. In 2010, Carolyne convinced her husband and Labrador that a few months in France would be fun–they stayed for 13 months. Currently, they split time between Southern France and Canmore in the Canadian Rockies. At home or on the road, she writes a food and travel blog, Ginger and Nutmeg. She recently launched a digital magazine focused on Provence called Perfectly Provence and has two travel apps available here

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Thanks, Carolyne!

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) Was Ben Affleck wrong to ask PBS to keep his family secret?

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Producing A Cooking Segment: Letting Food Tell The Story

CBS "The Dish" Producer Marci Waldman and Debbie Mitchell
The James Beard Awards 25 Years, 2015 Book, Broadcast & Journalism Awards, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

May 8, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

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CBS The Dish Producer Marci Waldman and Debbie Mitchell
The James Beard Awards 25 Years, 2015 Book, Broadcast & Journalism Awards, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

My former CBS coworkers–producers Marci Waldman and Greg Mirman–were winners at this year’s James Beard Awards. Their Saturday show, This Morning’s The Dish, took home an award in the Broadcast and Media Television Segment category. This was the first time the show was submitted and nominated. Last week, Ready4Air published an interview with Marci where she talked about their excitement with winning. The conversation continues below as she discusses how food tells the story.

What makes this show unique and stand out as different from the other food programs on television?

Most traditional morning show food segments have chefs in-studio doing a cooking demo–a quick 2:30-3:00 segment–and oftentimes, the chefs are rushed and don’t finish the recipe. CBS This Morning: Saturday gives viewers an alternative to “traditional” cooking segments with The Dish.

Producing a food segment seems to be a lot of fun. What do you think makes a good food show and what’s the best part of your job?

Producing TV in general is a lot of fun. I think one of the most important elements of a good food show or food segment is pretty food. Presentation is everything, and the food has to look visually appealing. People eat with their eyes first. After your viewers are drooling over the table-scape, tell them a story.

By far, the best part of my job, is meeting and hanging out with chefs like Eli Kulp, from Philadelphia and Curtis Stone–who I waited almost four years to get on the show. He was worth the wait!

As a food segment producer, what three tips would you give to have a good food segment?

1. Think like a viewer when choosing recipes and dishes. Nobody wants to see glassy fish eyeballs staring at them at 8:00 in the morning (head off, Chef!)

2. Do as much research as possible on the chef. Read as many interviews as you can and be prepared to remind them of funny anecdotes or stories from their own lives. They often forget a story they told a few years ago, but if you remind them that they cooked a salmon in the dishwasher when they were 17 (Ben Ford), it will make for a great moment on TV.

3. Talk to them and make them feel welcome and comfortable and explain the segment, but DON’T over-rehearse them. They will get into their own head and will start freaking out.

Tell us something about producing a good segment that foodies and readers would be surprised to learn.

I often tell my chefs that I can’t cook, but I can produce. I always use the food on the table as a conduit to the conversation. Food tells a story and evokes emotion. Thomas Keller’s Ultimate Dish was grilled cheese and tomato soup because it reminded him of his mom. Let the food start the conversation and the rest will follow.

Other than your own show, what food shows do you enjoy watching?

Anything that Anthony Bourdain produces or hosts I will watch. I also love Eric Ripert’s Avec Eric because, come on, it’s Eric Ripert.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Winning A James Beard Award: For CBS “This Morning’s The Dish” The First Time Is The Charm

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) Ireland is a destination for foodies

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Winning A James Beard Award: For CBS “This Morning’s The Dish” The First Time Is The Charm

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May 1, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

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CBS This Morning The Dish producer Marci Waldman and Debbie Mitchell
The 2015 James Beard Foundation Book, Broadcast, and Journalism Awards, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Congratulations to my former CBS coworkers–producers Marci Waldman and Greg Mirman! Their Saturday show, “This Morning’s The Dish”, was a winner at this year’s James Beard Awards. The show took home an award in the Broadcast and Media Television Segment category. They are living proof that you have to be in it to win it! This was the first time the show was submitted and nominated. When I emailed Marci over the weekend for an interview, she was still reeling from their unexpected win. She says that as a first-time submitter to the awards, she didn’t think they would win right out of the gate.

I hadn’t seen Greg or Marci since leaving CBS The Early Show five years ago, so the night was made extra special by their win. It was a perfect way to top off the evening. Here’s what Marci had to say about the first time being a charm.

Related Post: Foodie Friday | A Weekend Of Foodie Fun: The 24th Annual James Beard Awards

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The CBS “This Morning The Dish” winning for Television Segment
The 2015 James Beard Foundation Book, Broadcast, and Journalism Awards, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Congratulations again on winning a 2015 James Beard Broadcast and Media Award! Tell me what it felt like when your team heard them say, “The James Beard Broadcast and Media Television Segment winner is CBS “This Morning’s The Dish”

Thank you so much. It still feels completely surreal to have won a James Beard Award! I was sitting at a table with my executive producer, Brian Applegate, our anchors Anthony Mason and Vinita Nair, and another producer, Greg Mirman. I heard the “C” in CBS announced and I looked at Anthony. He turned to me and said, “You did it Marc.” Vinita hugged me and I just thought OMG, we WON! I looked at Brian Applegate and he had a HUGE smile on his face and Mirman and I just stared at each other for a moment and then both broke into laughter. It was just pure joy.

What does winning the James Beard Broadcast and Media award mean to your team and the show?

This is our first submission, our first nomination, and our first win. Winning the James Beard Broadcast and Media Award means that we are doing something right. It is such a huge reward for all the hard work that everyone puts into this segment, to the entire show. It’s a huge morale boast for the entire staff.

Was this the first time you attended the James Beard Awards? Besides winning what were the highlights of the event?

It was the first time any of us had attended the James Beard Awards, and we were like kids in a culinary candy shop. Our heads were turning in every direction. The highlight of the event was seeing so many of the amazing chefs we’ve had on the show over the years. The first person I saw when I walked into the cocktail reception was Dorie Greenspan and just seeing her smiling face was a huge highlight. After we won, Michael Lomonaco came over to hug me and said he was so proud of me. Sean Brock, who had just won for his amazing cookbook, Heritage, came over to say he was happy for our win. These are chefs who I idolize, and they were congratulating me! It wasn’t just a highlight of the evening–it’s a highlight of my entire life.

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CBS The Dish winners for Television Segment (l) executive producer Brian Applegate, producer Greg Mirman, anchor Vinita Nair, producer Marci Waldman, and anchor Anthony Mason.
The 2015 James Beard Foundation Book, Broadcast, and Journalism Awards, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Tell us about This Morning’s The Dish.

The Dish is a weekly, live studio segment on CBS This Morning: Saturday. I produce and book the chefs for the segment. The best way to describe The Dish is it’s Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner and Chef, This is Your Life. Top chefs from around the country join anchors Anthony Mason and Vinita Nair at our “dinner” table for a meal of their ultimate dish. Through casual dinner conversation, viewers get the inside scoop on the biggest names in the culinary world.

On occasion, we present a special edition of The Dish as a longer-format profile piece, which tape producer extraordinaire Greg Mirman produces. We take a deeper look at the lives of movers and shakers in the food business and culinary scene.

Tell me about the James Beard Broadcast and Media submission process. Which shows did you submit, and what made these shows stand out as JBF award-worthy for you?

The process of selecting three segments to submit was almost painful because we are so passionate about each and every one of our chefs. Each come to play and with an amazing story to tell. We knew we were going to submit our Pat LaFreida profile because it was amazing. Pat–butcher and meat purveyor to just about everyone in the business–had just released his first cookbook MEAT: Everything You Need to Know, and our Jeff Glor spoke to him first. He spent time with him at the shop and on a field trip to a couple of restaurants he supplies meat to. Pat Sr. was also in the piece, and Greg did a beautiful job telling their story and their family history.

Our second submission was a round-table chat at the International Culinary Center, which was celebrating its 30th anniversary. Anthony and Vinita interviewed Dean of Pastry and Master Pastry Chef/Chocolatier Jacques Torres and past graduates Daisy Martinez, Michael Chernow, and Wylie Dufresne about their time at ICC and what the experience had meant to them and their careers. It was a rousing, often hysterical conversation that really showed the personalities of four of the country’s top chefs and our anchors.

Our final submission was the hardest because I needed to pick one of our in-studio segments. My first round selection had 20 chefs, and Brian kicked me out of his office. I went back to the drawing board and with a broken heart whittled the list down to 10 of my favorite segments. I went back in–all happy with myself–and he told me to come back when the list was down to two. (WHAT?) I watched those segments over and over and finally decided that Dorie Greenspan’s segment had all the elements we wanted–a visually beautiful table, a chef with an original and engaging story to tell, and Anthony and Vinita having fun with the chef. Dorie checked all the boxes and then some.

Related Post: Foodie Friday | 2014 James Beard Nominees Announced & Chefs Getting Social

How many categories did you enter and which one did you win?

We entered one category, Television Segment, and won that category.

How did you feel when you got the news that you were nominated?

The James Beard Foundation announced all nominees live via their Twitter feed, and I was lying in bed with my phone clutched in my hand, scrolling through each tweet. Television Segment popped up and The Dish was the first entry. I screamed out loud! With shaking hands, I sent an email to Brian, Anthony, Vinita, and Greg that said (SUBJECT LINE) YES!!!!!!!!!!! (BODY OF TEXT) We are nominated for a James Beard Award!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (I saved the email, so I know how many exclamation points I put in.)

When you saw the competition in your category, what did you think?

When I saw that The Hungry Hound and DeRusha Eats had been nominated as well, I thought, “Wow, tough competition.” I do extensive research for all The Dish segments and many have come from their neck of the woods. I have watched many of their segments and am a huge fan of their work. Steve Dolinsky has several James Beard Awards under his belt. Jason DeRusha comes from WCCO, one of CBS News’s strongest affiliates. We were going up against family!

And, finally, are you going to submit for another James Beard Award next year?

ABSOLUTELY!

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Thanks, Marci! Again, congrats to you and the team.

Coming up: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) Letting the food tell the story in a cooking segment

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Saying Goodbye To Legendary Fries

A line outside of Pommes Frites in New York City.

April 17, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

A line outside of Pommes Frites in New York City.

A line outside of Pommes Frites in New York City.
Pommes Frites” by bigbirdz is licensed under CC BY 2.0

By Chef Elle Simone

In my early days of being a newbie New Yorker, my Saturday nights (and possibly Mondays–Thursdays, as well) were filled with summer evenings exploring jam-packed bars and lounges. My crew and I would begin the night with our ritualistic trip to Pommes Frites–a restaurant that serves authentic Belgian fries–to, ya know, fuel up! We’d spend the entire walk there debating and discussing which aioli we loved, tried last week, were intimidated by, or must have. My favorite is the rosemary-garlic mayo. These times with my friends–these nights filled with life-changing, mayo-based–decisions have been an integral part of what has been the best time of my life, and it took a tragedy for me to realize it.

On March 26, New Yorkers’ worlds were rocked by the news of the devastating gas explosion and building collapse in the East Village, in which two lives were lost. Numerous buildings were damaged or destroyed, including the legendary Pommes Frites. Now, it’s highly possible that you live in another city and have never heard of their Belgian-style delicacy, so let’s get into the history of it all.

After traveling through Europe during college and later working in the European travel industry, founder/owner Suzanne Levinson decided to share her love of Belgian fries with New York City. She established Pommes Frites in 1997. The unique, double-frying process that produces a crispy fried exterior and a fluffy potato filling has left New Yorkers mesmerized. Foodies are devastated at the loss of a mainstay.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Do You Prefer Beer Or Wine?

Brooklynite Lakeshia C. tells us about her Pommes Frite fetish, “I’m a true lover of fries but not so much of ketchup, so the mayo-based dips were always the most exciting part of that spot. Also, I could always eat on the go. I’ll miss that place.”

Will Pommes Frites resurrect, or will Levinson use this time to explore other culinary trends? Will Pommes just be a story of old for natives and veteran transplants? Who knows? What I do know is that if Pommes Frites doesn’t return to New York, it is very likely that I will be getting some new passport stamps from a wanderlust quest for fries of the Belgian variety. That leads me to a post about traveling, which I’ll get into later. Stay tuned!

Now, let’s get cooking,

Elle

Disclaimer: I want to express my deepest concern and sympathy to all the residents of the East Village and their families who are affected by the unfortunate series of events. This post is not in any way meant to ignore or trivialize the tragedy that has occurred.

####

Thank you, Elle!

Chef Elle: Chef Coat by Chandler Timothy at Bobby Dale Images

Chef Elle: Chef Coat by Chandler Timothy at Bobby Dale Images

Elle Simone is a culinary maverick. Always drawn to creative food culture, Elle has been dazzling the culinary world since 2006, quickly becoming a highly sought-after freelance food stylist and culinary producer. Elle has collaborated with and contributed her unique styling abilities to Food Network, Food Network Magazine, The Cooking Channel, Katie, CBS Corporation, ABC’s The Chew, and Bravo’s Chef Roble and Co.

Elle’s specialties don’t stop with styling and production. As the creator of SheChef, Elle shares her passion for culinary arts by mentoring women within the industry and by sharing meals through The Cast Iron Supper Club. Through SheChef, Elle brings a holistic approach to culinary and media and its multitude of avenues, offering the following services: recipe testing, recipe development, cookbook editing/formatting, cooking lessons, and menu planning. With a focus on beautiful and tasty dishes, Elle transcends the traditional role of a chef, working to share her gift and tell a story through food.

You can find Chef Elle anywhere below:

Instagram: @Chef_Elle and @SheChefLLC
LinkedIn: Chef Elle
Website: SheChef.org
Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) Summer 2015 movies are for ladies and laughs
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Do You Prefer Beer Or Wine?

beer

April 10, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

beer

By Alexis Trass Walker

Chances are that you consume alcohol. According to a study of 1,000 people by Mr. Beer—the country’s leading provider of home brewing kits—79 percent of American adults say they drink beer, wine, and liquor. And you might have had a drink recently since 12 percent drink four to six times per week, 27 percent have a drink up to three times a week, and 25 percent have a few drinks each month.

One in three Americans think beer and ale drinkers are the most sociable people and just as intelligent and friendly as those who favor wine and liquor, according to a new report. But when socializing with friends, 44 percent say beer is their drink of choice. That’s not surprising given that a popular question is “Who do you most want to have a beer with?” Beer drinking seems to be associated with having a down-to-earth personality. Compare that with 27 percent who prefer wine and 25 percent who like liquor.

Overall, 34 percent prefer beer to wine and liquor, citing the taste (38 percent), its casual appeal (30 percent) and its cooling effect in warm weather (28 percent). “It’s clear that beer continues to gain in popularity, especially with the new flavors and styles being introduced by the craft beer revolution,” said Rick Zich, president of Mr. Beer.

I’m not a beer drinker. It’s often my friends’ drink of choice when we go out, but I just don’t like the grainy flavor. I enjoy amaretto liqueurs—especially Disaronno—because of their versatility. In fact, more than half of liquor lovers say it’s not just the taste that attracts them, but also the range of flavors available and liquor’s ability to be mixed for cocktails. That sounds about right for me. I don’t care for amaretto sour, but I like amaretto and Sprite.

You probably already know that craft beer is very popular, and according to the study, its popularity continues to rise. Fifty-two percent of those surveyed say they now drink craft beer. According to the Brewers Association, craft brewers sold an estimated $14.3 billion worth of beer in 2013, a 14 percent increase over 2012

Sixty-two percent of home brewers cited that they liked coming up with their own beer flavor. Nearly half said the beer they brewed themselves was as delicious and just as good as store-bought beer.

“There’s a certain pride that comes along with making your own craft beer,” said Zich. “Not only is the taste outstanding, it also allows you to experiment with the beer styles you like, and create something all your own.” With that kind of versatility, perhaps it’s time for me to give beer another chance.

Related Post: Ready4Air | Bottoms Up – When The TV Trend Is Booze On The Tube

Top 10 Beer Styles

  1.    American Ale
  2.    Light Lager
  3.    Specialty Beer
  4.    English Pale Ale
  5.    Pilsener
  6.    Fruit Beer
  7.    Dark Lager
  8.    English Brown Ale
  9.    Stout/Light Hybrid
  10.    German Wheat and Rye

Top 10 Craft Beers

  1.    Samuel Adams Utopia
  2.    Sierra Nevada: Pale Ale
  3.    Dogfish Head: 90 Minute IPA
  4.    Goose Island Bourbon County Stout
  5.    Anchor Brewing/Anchor Steam
  6.    Sierra Nevada Bigfoot Barkeywine-style Ale
  7.    Brooklyn Brewery:30 Brooklyn Lager
  8.    Lagunitas: IPA
  9.    Firestone Walker: Parabola
  10.    (Tie) Russia River: Pliny the Elder, Dark Horse: Plead the 5th, Ballast Point: Sculpin, Founder’s Breakfast Stout
Alexis Trass Walker

Alexis Trass Walker

Alexis Trass Walker is a freelance writer and copy editor who blogs about grammar and other things at alexistrasswalker.com. Connect with her on Twitter @alexistrass.

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) Sparks set to fly again with “The Longest Ride”

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Greece: A Destination For Foodies

Greece collage 2

April 3, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Greece collage 2

Photo credit: Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

 

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Greek prosciutto?

Grilled caper leaves?

Warm fava?

Michelin-starred restaurants?

Nocturnal grapes?

An Athens-based conference was our excuse. The 30-year lapse since my last visit to Greece was long enough for me. I convinced my “first-timer” husband that he might enjoy Greece for its beautiful islands and profound history, but I never thought to sway him with a discussion on the merits of Greek food.

My Montreal-based childhood days were a multicultural potpourri; kids from Caribbean, Greek, and European families shared the halls of my elementary school. Our lunch boxes reflected family backgrounds and the array of global spices, with everything from PB & J on white (mine) to roti, spanakopita, and cabbage rolls (theirs).

However, despite my childhood exposure to considerable food variety, I admit that I was wholly unprepared for the sophistication of the food we encountered in Greece.

The country may be able to thank the European Union (post-Euro debt crisis) for global standardization requirements and competitive market exposure. Those Euro-zone benefits have resulted in entrepreneurial food products and gold medal wines from Greece.

Greece 1 collage

Photo credit: Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

 

Do not fear if you covet a juicy handheld souvlaki dripping through its wax paper envelope; you can find those in ready quantities. However, if your Greek food repertoire ends at baklava and retsina wine, it might be time to consider a visit to the country.

Athens has five Michelin-starred restaurants, countless food tours, and a delicious range of cooking classes. Whether you stay in the capital city or travel beyond to sample escargot from Crete, the unique Santorini tomato, or Protected Designation of Origin pistachios from Aegina Island, quench your thirst with any number of 90+ point wines (Wine Spectator magazine).

For a full A-Z adventure through some of the foods of Greece, you can read the original post on Ginger and Nutmeg: 26 Food Reasons to Travel to Greece.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | The Almonds of Provence

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

With her camera and laptop nearby, Carolyne is living proof that there is no such thing as a single career anymore. She began her working life as an equity stock trader and then moved to commercial real estate and project management. She has entered the world of freelance writing and social media consulting. In 2010, Carolyne convinced her husband and Labrador that a few months in France would be fun–they stayed for 13 months. Currently, they split time between Southern France and Canmore in the Canadian Rockies. At home or on the road, she writes a food and travel blog, Ginger and Nutmeg. She recently launched a digital magazine focused on Provence called Perfectly Provence and has two travel apps available here

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Thanks, Carolyne!

Coming up: Ready4Air (TV) Katie Couric is producing a morning news comedy series

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | A Fun Foodie Holiday: Something On A Stick Day

Lamb

March 27, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Lamb

Lamb kidney on skewers by Alpha is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Alexis Trass Walker

National food days are no big deal, right? There’s a celebration practically every day of the year. You might have celebrated a few like National Ice Cream Day (July 19) or Hamburger Day (May 28). I’m partial to National Pizza Day (February 9, best celebrated with a Chicago-style pizza) and I could never forget National Chocolate Day (October 28). But there are some food holidays that are unusual and very specific.

Watermelon fruit bar

Watermelon Mint Fruit Bar
Photo credit: Debbie Mitchell

Take National Something On a Stick Day, for example. The holiday, which is tomorrow–March 28, celebrates all food that comes on a stick like popsicles, lollipops, corndogs, and frozen bananas. And, why not? There’s something very satisfying about food with a stick driven through it. It’s reminiscent of summer. There’s a reason why you’ll find food on a stick at cocktail and birthday parties: simplicity. Food on a stick is cute and there’s no fuss. Presentation and clean up are a breeze, and who doesn’t love a little cake pop?

It’s very simple to celebrate the day. All you do is get a stick, put some food on it, and enjoy your creation. If that’s too much work, then let somebody else do the food on a stick for you. When you shop for groceries tomorrow, stop and grab a food sample on a toothpick. Or visit a restaurant that serves food that is traditionally presented on a skewer, like meat or vegetable kebabs. Then you’ll officially be celebrating Something On a Stick Day!

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Bone Broth: America’s Powerful New Superfood

Alexis Trass Walker

Alexis Trass Walker

Alexis Trass Walker is a freelance writer and copy editor who blogs about grammar and other things at alexistrasswalker.com. Connect with her on Twitter @alexistrass.

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) Only five nominees for Oscars’ Best Picture? Is that the best idea?

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Bone Broth: America’s Powerful New Superfood

Mushroom soup

March 13, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Mushroom soup

Mushroom soup made with bone broth.
Photo credit: Ariane Resnick

By Ariane Resnick

Bone broth is a fairly new health trend, but it is one of humanity’s oldest foods. For as long as we have been cooking meat, we’ve been boiling the bones with water afterward. While there are many health benefits of well-sourced animal products, there are even more from bone broth. Rich in collagen, gelatin, amino acids, CLA, and Omega 3, and useful for healing ailments including inflammation, sports injury, cellulite, leaky gut, and IBS, the broth of grass-fed and pasture-raised organic animal bones is America’s powerful new superfood.

Often confused with soup stock, bone broth is the result of boiling animal bones with water for far longer than one would for stock, and without the need for a bouquet garni. With many hours of simmering, the taste and health benefits of onions or carrots would be long since lost, though you can certainly add them after. You need only to add a small amount of salt and some apple cider vinegar to help pull the minerals out of the bones, in addition to bones and water.

If the process sounds familiar to you, you may already be familiar with an ethnic version of bone broth. In Jewish culture, long-boiled chicken soup is a common cure for colds and lovingly referred to as “Jewish penicillin.” Asian cultures consume “long-life broth” to promote longevity, and nearly every native group worldwide has their version. However, it is only in the past year or two that bone broth has gained popularity in America, fueled both by the Paleo diet movement and the opening of bone broth cafes in major cities.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | The Almonds of Provence

veggiesoup

Vegetable soup made with bone broth.
Photo credit: Ariane Resnick

The benefits of bone broth are manifold, but they can only be obtained from properly sourced bones. If you boil factory-farmed conventional bones, you will be concentrating the pesticides the animals are fed, the hormones and antibiotics they’re given, and all of their inflammatory conditions. Bone broth is only useful if made with grass-fed, pasture-raised, and organic bones. That said, all types of bones are good for broth, from chicken carcasses to pig’s feet to lamb shanks. You can use one, or a mix, and should choose whichever animal’s flavor you most prefer. You can use either leftover cooked bones from a meal you’ve made, or buy them specifically to make broth.

My ratio for making bone broth is a simple one: 1 pound of bones to 1 quart of water, with 1 teaspoon of salt and ½ tablespoon of cider vinegar. If you are using raw bones, the taste will be improved by browning them first in the pot, but that isn’t necessary. Bone broth is cooked for 2-3 hours in a pressure cooker, 12-24 hours on the stovetop, or 24-48 hours in a slow cooker. After simmering for the right duration of time for your cooking method, cool and strain out the bones. You can increase the ratio to make any amount of broth, and it freezes very well; make sure to chill it thoroughly first. The fat that collects on top once the broth is cold is nutrient-rich and can replace butter or oil in other recipes. It can be used as a warming drink, a base for soups, or to replace water when cooking grains or legumes. I have 50 recipes for everything from stews to tonics using bone broth in my upcoming book, The Bone Broth Miracle, which will be released late this spring by Skyhorse Publishing. However you choose to use it, bone broth is a simple, delicious tool for wellness.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Going Vegan Is A Joy With A Farm-To-Table Menu

Ariane Resnick

Chef Ariane Resnick
Photo credit: Chris Bacarella Photography

Ariane Resnick is a private chef and certified nutritionist who specializes in organic farm-to-table cuisine and creates indulgent, seemingly “normal” food out of impeccably clean, whole food ingredients. She has cooked for celebrities that include Gwyneth Paltrow, Chris Martin, Matt Groening, Lisa Edelstein, and Jeff Franklin, and has been featured in media such as Well + Good NYC, In Style, Star, Goop.com, food.com, Huffington Post, Refinery29.com, Muscle & Fitness, Men’s Fitness, and Food Network’s Chopped. She is also a survivor of late stage Lyme Disease and chemical poisoning, and recovered holistically from both. When not crafting beautifully presented tasty dishes that accommodate just about any dietary restriction, Resnick consults clients and chefs on wellness and nutrition, and provides hands-on instruction for simple ways to cook more healthfully. Her first book, The Bone Broth Miracle, will be released late this spring by Skyhorse Publishing.

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Thanks, Ariane!

Coming up: How one-man band reporters can work efficiently to meet deadlines

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | The Almonds of Provence

Tian aux

March 6, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Almond tree blossoms

Almond tree blossoms
Photo credit: Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

For most Canadians, the thought of flowering trees in February is absurd. That is not the case in Provence where the almond tree blooms early in the year. The small white or pale-pink flowers typically appear on the trees by February–a welcome sign that spring is nearby.

The almond tree is small; at full maturity it may reach a height of 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 12 inches. The trees typically start bearing after about five years. The almond is technically a fruit, not a nut; it is from the same family as the plum or cherry (Prunus).

Referenced in the Bible, this decidedly old tree has been a part of human nutrition for centuries. Cultivation of these trees closely followed human migration, and as a result, almonds are found in many local cuisines all around the Mediterranean and the Middle East, often featured in sweets and desserts. However, in more modern times, a large majority (45%) of world production comes from California.

Ancient Provencal cuisine was modest fare; the inhabitants made use of local, seasonal ingredients. With the vast quantities and varieties of foods available locally now, the bland diet of yesteryear would be a surprise to most. The climate of Provence is harsh, with chilly winters, dry summers, and a biting mistral wind that forced ancient populations to survive on what they could forage. Maybe the original “100-mile diet” was invented in Provence–sheep, goat-supplied milk and cheese, olives milled for oil, and almonds ground into flour.

This is an easy Provencal dessert that is both gluten-free and delicious!

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | What Is A Far Breton From Brittany, France?

Tian aux

Tian aux fruits
Photo credit: Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Tian aux fruits (Baked Fruit in Almond Crust)

Prep time: 15 mins

Cook time: 30 mins

Total time: 45 mins

Serves: 6-8

A tian is a traditional clay pottery dish from Provence. There are beautiful variations that can be found in local markets, although the traditional variety is made by a few potteries. A glass baking dish (like Pyrex) is a good alternative. Do not use metal. The dessert is really easy and not too sweet. You can make this with any fruit or berry that is in season except strawberries (they are too runny).

Ingredients

1 cup (250g) ground almond flour
3⁄4 cup (175ml) raspberry preserves, or jam of choice
1 large egg
3⁄4 cup (175ml) heavy cream
4-6 apples, Golden are best
1 cup pitted cherries
Pinch ground white pepper
1 whole organic orange, for the zest
2 tablespoons Grand Marnier

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Lightly oil a tian pan or glass baking dish.

Wash, peel, seed, and chop the apples.

Wash, pit, and chop the cherries.

Put the apples and cherry pieces in the baking dish.

In a bowl, combine the almond flour, cream, egg, jam, orange zest, pepper, and Grand Marnier. Mix until well blended.

Pour the almond mixture over the fruit and try to cover evenly.

Bake for 25-30 minutes, until the top is golden brown.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Going Vegan Is A Joy With A Farm-To-Table Menu

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

With her camera and laptop nearby, Carolyne is living proof that there is no such thing as a single career anymore. She began her working life as an equity stock trader and then moved to commercial real estate and project management. She has entered the world of freelance writing and social media consulting. In 2010, Carolyne convinced her husband and Labrador that a few months in France would be fun–they stayed for 13 months. Currently, they split time between Southern France and Canmore in the Canadian Rockies. At home or on the road, she writes a food and travel blog, Ginger and Nutmeg. She recently launched a digital magazine focused on Provence called Perfectly Provence and has two travel apps available here

####

Thanks Carolyne!

Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) Jackson Murphy takes a look at the March box office

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Going Vegan Is A Joy With A Farm-To-Table Menu

Bessan Chila

February 27, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Bessan Chila

Bessan Chila, made with chickpea flour
Photo credit: Marian Rivman

 

By Marian Rivman

For several months, I wanted to treat myself to a spa vacation.

After more than a decade of caregiving for my mother, I needed to reset my mind, body, and spirit to prepare myself for the next chapter of my life. When I recently made a spur-of-the-moment decision to take a trip to the Philippines–the country where I did my Peace Corps service decades ago–I had the brilliant idea of going to a spa while I was there.

After an extensive Google search, I decided that The Farm at San Benito, located just a 90-minute drive from Manila, was the place for me. It was physically beautiful, offered an unbelievably extensive choice of spa and wellness treatments, and there were daily workout activities that included yoga, water aerobics, cross training, and power walks. It sounded like my idea of heaven. My only trepidation was that The Farm was totally vegan, and 85 percent of the food on the menu at their Alive restaurant was served raw.

It’s not that I’m a raging carnivore, but my normal diet includes chicken, fish, eggs, and dairy in addition to fruits, vegetables, beans, and nuts. Going totally vegan for a week was going to be a challenge. I was envisioning food choices that would be bland and boring.

After my first day at The Farm, I realized my concern was totally unfounded. Actually, one of the high points of my stay at The Farm was the food, which was consistently healthy, nutritious, and absolutely delicious. Each dish was pleasing to both the palate and the eye.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Neither Sleet Nor Snow Stops A Day Of Good Eats

From clockwise, top right:

From clockwise, top right: mixed organic salad, cassava flour pancakes with coconut sugar syrup, stuffed young coconut with hoisin sauce, fruit salad with homemade coconut milk yogurt, scrambled tofu and roasted potatoes, green smoothie
All photos courtesy of Marian Rivman

Lucrecia Buking, the head chef who has been with The Farm since it opened, is a culinary queen. With help from visiting chefs and her talented kitchen staff, she has created world-class recipes. My favorites included: Bessan Chila (made with chickpea flour) with Cilantro and Tamarind Chutney; Mixed Organic Salad with Tomato, Mango, Cucumber, and Nut Cheese; Vermicelli with stir Fried Vegetables; and Rice Flour Pancakes with Coconut Sugar Syrup. The homemade granola served at breakfast each morning is swoon-worthy. It’s a mixture of hazelnuts, pecans, walnuts, shredded green apples, desiccated coconut, bananas, coconut sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and sea salt that is put in a dehydrator overnight.

The farm-to-table organic menu at the spa is not a trend; it’s a way of life. There’s an extensive garden right next to the restaurant where all the greens for salads and herbs for dressings, teas, and sauces are grown. There’s an organic coconut plantation and a small processing plant on the property. There’s also a coffee plantation and fruit groves. In addition, The Farm’s horticulturist is working with local farmers to teach them how to grow organic vegetables, which the spa then buys.

The kitchen is spotlessly clean and well-equipped. I took two cooking classes while I was there and learned how they work their magic. There is a high-speed blender that’s used for salad dressings, sauces, and delectable smoothies. There is a juicer that presses a seemingly endless variety of creative combinations of drinks for those guests who are on a carefully monitored detox program. Most importantly, absolutely nothing leaves the kitchen unless it has been carefully plated. Food and beverages arrive at the table looking like works of art.

Going vegan at The Farm was not a challenge at all. It was a joy.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | What Is A Far Breton From Brittany, France?

Marian Rivman is a New York-based public relations and communications consultant. Her clients have included UN agencies, Fortune 500 companies, international nonprofits, bold-faced names, and the recreational scuba diving industry. She is known for her unbounded energy, directness, and skill at translating complex issues into comprehensible messages for an array of audiences. Marian is particularly interested in the power of nonverbal communication. In addition to her independent consulting work, Marian is affiliated with New Solutions.

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Social) Learn how to create a podcast
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Repost | Foodie Friday | How To Eat Like A Vegan: Culinary Tips From American Writer Jarid Manos

Jarid-Headshot-694x1024

February 20, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Jarid-Manos-692x1024

Jarid Manos, CEO Great Plains Restoration Council
Photo Credit: Julia Yarbough Media Group

 

By Julia Yarbough

Last week, we had the chance to hear from American writer and vegan athlete Jarid Manos about his dedication to living a vegan lifestyle. Making a commitment to a healthy and nutritious diet, the author of the emotionally raw and powerful novel Ghetto Plainsman and the creator of this season’s inspiring new blog journey Fear & Loving: Where the Ocean Meets the Streets, Manos says sharing with others his expertise and knowledge about what it means to be a vegan is almost a calling.

Related post: Foodie Friday | No Animal Products In Your Diet: Committing To A Vegan Lifestyle

“The benefits of being a vegan are profound,” explains Manos. “It improves your health, your spirituality, your personal growth. You have greater endurance and a greater ability to care for others. It can help heal or prevent sickness from even starting.”

With so much media attention on the health perks of adopting a vegan lifestyle, where does one even begin to learn what to eat and how to prepare vegan foods? Manos advises, start simple. He says it’s best to begin eating more plant-based foods that you like and drink plenty of water as you begin making the change. He says a step in the right direction is to begin with a few meatless meals a week.

Manos says some of his favorite food items are readily available in local supermarkets, meaning there’s not always a need to seek out specialty stores. Watch Jarid Manos’s vegan tips.

“I love barbecue tofu!” explains Manos. “I love vegan mac and cheese, collard greens, raw greens of any kind, and sweet potatoes–but keep the skins on. I love bananas, avocados, and sunflower seeds. Soak them in water and it becomes a high-powered protein. I love green smoothies, wheatgrass juice, carrots, sprouts, quinoa, and black beans.”

Manos reminds us that becoming vegan doesn’t have to be difficult, but advises, “Choose organic. Everything organic.”

Having recently relocated to famed Miami Beach–an environment in which health and fitness is as common as breathing–Manos says his favorite vegan-focused restaurant is the food bar and offerings at his local Whole Foods.

Related post: Foodie Friday | Food As Medicine: My Nutrition Revolution

“I love the hot- and cold-serve menu and the fresh juice bar. You can sit outside and eat. You can custom nutrient-pack your meal and this location also gives me a really cool Black/Afro-South Florida and Caribbean community feel.”

Does going vegan have to be hard? Does it mean depriving yourself of good foods? “Trust me, we don’t suffer,” says Manos. “We love the richness and diversity of food!”

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Jarid Manos, CEO Great Plains Restoration Council

 

Jarid Manos is the author of Ghetto Plainsman (available on Amazon) and the CEO of the Texas-based Great Plains Restoration Council. Manos has devoted more than a decade of his life to making healthy choices for not only his own body, but for that of the Earth.

Join Manos on his latest journey, Fear & Loving: Where the Ocean Meets the Streets, a two-year blog-story chronicling Manos’ desire to “go deep” into facing his own fears about life and the world around us. Manos is becoming a certified scuba diver in order to bring greater awareness to the complexities of our oceans and fragile coral reefs. Come with Manos on this deeply personal exploration at www.jaridmanos.com.

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Film) Lights-Camera-Jackson gives his 2015 LCJ Movie Awards

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Repost | Culinary Cues | Chef Nadege Shares A Healthy Take On Foods We Love

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February 13, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Chef Nadege

Chef Nadege Fleurimond
Photo Credit: Linda Thelemaque

By Chef Nadege

Lasagna

Don’t get me wrong; I love the traditional lasagna. Sometimes I will use as many as four different types of cheese. I know, but I love cheesy anything. However, the white flour of the pasta of traditional lasagna along with all the trimmings does not make it the healthiest food option if you are watching your waistline.

The Fix

Whole wheat pasta. Forego the extra cheeses and stick to ricotta and mozzarella. They provide just enough flavor and you can season your ricotta with garlic powder and onion powder for that added flavor. Load up your lasagna with a nice mix of sautéed eggplant, spinach, and tomatoes. You don’t always have to go with ground beef. Try a chicken or a turkey option once in a while.

Make your own fresh tomato sauce by stewing down fresh tomatoes with olive oil and then adding a bit of water. You eliminate all the additives and sugar that way.

Related Post: Foodie Friday: 3 Hearty Favorites With A Twist

Chili

Chili is perhaps one of the most comforting and wholesome meals you can have during the winter months. The beans in chili provide you loads of protein. However, most traditional chili recipes call for ground beef and canned tomato sauce–two items that can add lots of extra calories, fat, and sugar on your plate.

The Fix

Use lean ground turkey meat or make a vegetarian chili by using your favorite MorningStar burger meat. Stew down fresh tomatoes for a fresher and tastier chili. Soak fresh or dried beans and cook them yourself. Canned beans have a lot of added sodium.

Chili-784x1024

Photo courtesy of Chef Nadege

 

Mashed Potatoes

If you are like me, mashed potatoes are the ultimate comfort food, especially during these cold winter months. Nothing beats the decadent flavor of mashed potatoes with butter and cream. But all that goodness comes with a price–saturated fat and loads of calories.

The Fix

Use sweet potatoes instead of regular potatoes. Sweet potatoes are a much better and healthier option. They are rich in Vitamin A and beta carotene, which is great for your skin. Sweet potatoes are also lower in carbs and starches and have fewer calories.

Related Post: Foodie Friday: Two Philly Foodies Take on Diner en Blanc

Nadege Fleurimond is an off-premise caterer in New York and caters in the Tri-state area. She is an ehow.com presenter. You may visit her website at www.fgcatering.com or subscribe to her YouTube channel for fun tips and recipes here.

She is currently working on a coffee table cookbook project about the regional cuisine of Haiti. The book, Haiti Uncovered, is slated to be released in the fall of 2014. Visit www.haitiuncovered.com for details.

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Coming Up: Ready4Air (Lifestyle) Marian Rivman writes about her travels to the Philippines and Hong Kong.

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Neither Sleet Nor Snow Stops A Day Of Good Eats

oxtail and butter beans

February 6, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

 

Debbie Mitchell

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

There’s nothing like a good snowstorm to get my appetite up. So far, the East Coast has been hit twice in less than two weeks with a hefty layering of snow, enough to, in the first case, shut down the New York subway system. The Blizzard of 2015 and this week’s snowstorm had New York Mayor de Blasio telling us to stock up on our groceries and to dress warm or just stay inside, which meant it was time to join my neighbors as they stocked up on food. For me, that meant comfort food.

blizzard 2015

Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Since I planned to spend the snowstorm watching a few movies, a couple of bags of popcorn–cheese covered and lightly salted–were in order. To balance it out, make it healthy, and reduce my guilt, I bought pineapples to make a few smoothies. I don’t know about you, but I love a good stew or soup during a snowstorm since both will last a few days.

oxtail and butter beans

Oxtail and butter beans
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell

I opted for butternut squash soup, Jamaican stewed peas, and oxtail and rice. My mom used to cook the last two dishes when my brother and I were kids, so they’ve become my go-to meals any time I am planning for a snowstorm. For the first Blizzard of 2015, I found comfort at home.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Punta Cana, Dominican Republic: So Nice I Visited Twice

blizzard 2015 nyc street

New York City snowstorm, February 2015
Photo Credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz

For this week’s storm, I ventured out. The snow was falling, the streets were slippery, and Chinatown was calling my name. Just like the mailman, not even snow was going to stop me and two snow-bunny food bloggers–Jackie Gordon and Lora Wiley-Lennartz–from grabbing a bite of dim sum at Shanghai Cafe Deluxe. The nondescript cafe is located in the middle of 100 Mott Street, a few blocks from the Canal Street train station. The restaurant wasn’t bustling on this snowy day, but it didn’t matter since the food was fabulous, and we had the place pretty much to ourselves.

dry fried string beans

Dry fried string beans at Shanghai Cafe Deluxe, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Debbie Mitchell Media Associates

 

rice cakes with pork and veggies

Rice cakes with pork and preserved vegetables at Shanghai Cafe Deluxe, NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

 

Jackie Gordon

Jackie Gordon at Shanghai Cafe Deluxe, NYC 2015
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

As you can see, we ate our plates clean.

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Caramels and chocolates courtesy of Stick With Me Sweets, NYC 2015
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Once we finished our meal, we headed out for drinks. But first, we stopped at the cutest candy shop further down Mott Street called Stick With Me Sweets. The recently-opened store was filled with delightful and delicious bite-sized treats, including yuzu and salt caramels and a variety of dark or white chocolate bonbons filled with everything from mint chips to raspberry flavors. I usually choose salty over sweet, but tonight it was all about the sweets!

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Gourmet Holiday Delights From Munich’s Dallmayr Market

caramels and chocolates

Caramels and chocolates courtesy of Stick With Me Sweets, NYC 2015
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Chocolatier Susanna Yoon, formerly of Per Se, came out from the back to greet us and talk chocolates with Jackie as we all sampled the goods. Once we were done tasting, we purchased a few for the road ($1.50 for caramels and $3.50 for bonbons) and headed out to top off the evening with drinks.

Yes, the second snowstorm of the season was cold, wet, and slippery, but it still turned out to be an excellent day of food.

What do you like to eat when snow is on the ground?

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Coming up: Film critic Jackson Murphy talks to animator Glen Keane

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | What Is A Far Breton From Brittany, France?

The dessert Far Breton from the Brittany region of France
Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

January 30, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

Desserts from  Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Desserts from Crêpes Cidre et Companie
Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

By Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Brittany or Bretagne (French) is in the northwest corner of France, far from Paris and a long distance from the Alps. Brittany is a long way from the olive trees and grape vines of Provence. In many ways, Brittany is far from everything. There is even a department within Brittany called Finistère (translated, this means the end of the earth).

Bretons are a hardy population that has survived off the land and the sea for centuries. Man’s historical footprints in this remote area run deep. The region was sparsely inhabited during the Lower Paleolithic era (2.million years ago), long before five Celtic tribes established territories. Brittany is a place of incredible beauty and a unique cuisine.

If you thought crêpes and galettes (savory crepes made with buckwheat flour) were invented in Paris, think again. These satisfying creations with a cornucopia of potential fillings come from the land of eggs, butter, apples, cider, fish, sea salt, and much more.

We met Delphine, the owner of Crêpes Cidre et Companie, when we rented in Aix en Provence one year. Delphine is a magical blend of Spanish roots and a childhood spent in northwestern France. Her Breton heritage is recreated daily in a tiny kitchen at 23, rue de la Cépède in Aix. Her crêpes and galettes are made to order with love, and generous quantities of ingredients – lots of butter, whole milk, and eggs. You can read more about her crêpes here.

Delphine promotes Brittany and its excellent products from her tiny corner of Provence. We have tasted delicious ciders made with apples, pears, and even chestnuts. We have stocked up on bright tea towels and salted caramel butter. We have never been able to leave Crêpes Cidre et Companie without full tummies and traditional treats from her hearth.

If you are early, there are usually sweet, buttery Madeleine cookies and sometimes, if you are very lucky, a slice of her traditional Far Breton. This dessert from Brittany is a tasty delight somewhere between a flan and a pudding. A Far Breton is similar to a Clafoutis or a Fiadone from Corsica. The key ingredient–much like for perfect crêpe batter–is the flour.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | 6 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Haitian Cuisine

Far is the word for flour in Brittany. With origins as a savory dish made with buckwheat flour, Far Breton was traditionally served with roasts in the 18th century. As tastes changed and refined products became readily available, the recipe evolved into the sweet dessert that is enjoyed today.

 

The dessert Far Breton from the Brittany region of France Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

The dessert Far Breton from the Brittany region of France
Photo courtesy of Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Far Breton From Brittany
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: French
Prep time: 10 mins
Cook time: 55 mins
Total time: 1 hour 5 mins
Serves: 8-10

The recipe is very simple. It is best to eat Far Breton slightly warm, the day it is made, as it can get a bit dense when it cools. The flan can be made with pitted prunes or apples. Delphine makes hers with prunes, so that is the one that Nutmeg attempted.
Note: In France sucre vanillé is sold in packages. You can make your own with a vanilla bean and white sugar or use one teaspoon of vanilla extract. Not too much as you do not want the batter to change color.

Ingredients:
1 cup white flour
⅔ cup white sugar
1 package (roughly 1 tablespoon) vanilla sugar (sucre vanillé) or extract – see note
4 large eggs
4 cups milk (2%)
½ cup pitted prunes
2 oz dark rum
Instructions:
Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F).
In a small bowl, soak the prunes in the rum.
In a mixing bowl, combine the flour and sugar together.
Add the eggs one at a time and whisk each one well.
Add the vanilla sugar (or extract) and the milk. Make sure to blend together well.
Finally, add the prunes and the rum.
Pour the batter into a buttered pan.
Bake for approximately 55-60 minutes. Check the progress a couple of times during the baking. The center should not jiggle too much.
The flan will rise and then fall after you remove from the oven.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Chef Helen Mirren Fights Over Food In “The Hundred-Foot Journey”

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

 

With her camera and laptop nearby, Carolyne is living proof that there is no such thing as a single career anymore. She began her working life as an equity stock trader and then moved to commercial real estate and project management. She has entered the world of freelance writing and social media consulting.
In 2010, Carolyne convinced her husband and Labrador that a few months in France would be fun–they stayed for 13 months. Currently, they split time between Southern France and Canmore in the Canadian Rockies. At home or on the road, she writes a food and travel blog, Ginger and Nutmeg. She recently launched a digital magazine focused on Provence called Perfectly Provence and has two travel apps available here

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Coming up: Ready4Air (Social) Must-Have Apps For 2015

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

Emmy-nominated network television producer Deborah Mitchell is a veteran of ABC and CBS News, a member of the Producers Guild of America, and a board member of the James Beard Broadcast and Media Awards Committee. Through Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, she will create your online personality with a customized website, book you on the right television show, manage your social media profiles, and connect you with the best and brightest digital influencers. Deborah is a weekly contributor for Entrepreneur.com and author of So You Want To Be On TV. You can follow Deborah @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

Read More...

Ready4Air (The Week Ahead) | A New Year, A New Look | Using A Coworking Space | Lessons Learned In 2014 | James Beard Awards 2015

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January 5, 2015 | Posted in Brands and Bloggers Connect, Culinary Cues, TV Production | By

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Happy New Year to all! Goodbye 2014 and hello 2015!

I hope everyone had a fabulous holiday. The time that I spent unplugged for the holidays was needed and gave me to time to think about a lot of things, including a few new goals for the new year. I admit, I twitched a little in the beginning when I realized that my mom’s house in Florida didn’t have Wi-Fi, so being on the computer was out of the question. But I eventually relaxed and enjoyed having good old conversations with mom and her friends almost every day. Also, I got a chance to finally watch the much-hyped series, Breaking Bad, during their holiday marathon on the AMC network. I like the show, but don’t love it like the critics. In my book, The Sopranos tops Breaking Bad, no question.

Back to 2015. I’ve always been a huge fan of New Year’s Day. The beginning of a new year for me is filled with excitement and so much possibility. It is like a big do-over where I get to refocus and start over. Here at Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, we have a few things in the hopper that we’ll be sharing shortly. We are looking forward to collaborating with more brands and bloggers and sharing entrepreneurial tips on entrepreneur.com, as well as taking your brand’s online look up a notch with a spot-on website.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Brands & Bloggers) | Choosing The Right Bloggers For Campaigns

 Arise On Screen control room Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates


Arise On Screen control room
Photo Credit: Nick Viagas and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

Ready4Air (TV and Film) will continue to bring you the best backstage information about the industry before and behind the cameras. On January 4, 2015, my television team celebrated the one-year anniversary of our movie review show, Arise On Screen, hosted by film critic Mike Sargent. The year went by quickly, and the show has grown by leaps and bounds. The goal for our program this year is to tweak the 30-minute show to keep it interesting and entertaining for moviegoers and viewers alike in the new year. Stay tuned and watch as we make a few changes. See if you can spot them when you tune on Saturdays at 5:00 p.m. or online on our YouTube channel.

DMMA is also busy incorporating social media into television programming. One of the highlights of the end of last year was our social media management project for a newly-launched nationally syndicated court show. Court shows have been around a for a while, but this new show had a young, no-nonsense judge on the bench. Based on our social media postings, the audience seemed to like her fresh approach. Social media management and TV will continue to be on our calendar of projects in 2015, so stay tuned.

Related Post: Ready4Air (Social) | It’s Personal And Business: The Human Side Of Social Networking

Victoria Clark, Content Strategist Consultant Photo Credit: Victoria Clark

Victoria Clark, Content Strategist Consultant
Photo Credit: Victoria Clark

In the first week of 2015, we welcome back guest contributor Victoria Clark, a content strategist consultant who helps entrepreneurs in several different ways. In her first interview with Ready4Air, she explained that part of her job is to empower and connect people using social media. This week in Ready4Air (Brands And Bloggers), she pens a post entitled “Build Your Brand By Teaching At A Coworking Space.” Victoria, who is working as a membership and event manager for a coworking space, sees firsthand how business owners have successfully expanded their brand by adding classes at coworking communities to their marketing strategy. If you want to jump-start your brand or blogging in 2015, then check out this week’s post.

2014 Savor The Succcess Event, NYC. Photo Credit: Patrice Waite/ Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

2014 Savor the Success Event, NYC.
Photo Credit: Patrice Waite/Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

As for our team at Deborah Mitchell Media Associates, we’ve made a few changes during the year. Nay Ayache is still on board heading up the company’s website development, and copy editor Alexis Trass Walker joined us last fall, working to make sure that all our i’s are dotted and t’s are crossed–literally. I continue to share weekly online posts with entrepreneurs via entrepreneur.com. This week, I reveal on Ready4Air (Brands And Bloggers) “The Biggest Lessons I Learned Working Solo In 2014.” While running a business without a partner has its benefits, it can be challenging at times. During the last year, I’ve picked up a few tips to make the job of a solopreneur a little easier.

James Beard Portrait at James Beard House NYC Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

James Beard Portrait at James Beard House NYC
Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell and Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

And finally, Friday, January 9 is the last day to submit nominations for the 2015 James Beard Awards for Broadcast and New Media. For the first time ever, the main awards ceremony will leave New York during the first weekend in May and be held in Chicago. However, the Book, Broadcast & Journalism Awards Dinner will remain in New York City. The entry deadline for  the 2015 James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards is this Friday at 11:59 p.m. EST. If you have or know of a radio, podcast, webcast, or television broadcast covering the topic of food and beverage that originally aired in North America in 2014, then click here to read more about the JBF Awards submission criteria.

We are looking forward to meeting and, hopefully, working with many of you in the new year. Thank you for your continued support!

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Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

 

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen, a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement, follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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Repost | #Foodie Friday: Picture-Perfect Food: Tips On Food Photography

A-plate-of-pasta-300x200

January 2, 2015 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

 

With the incredible role that the Internet plays, imagery has become an even more integral part of the food world. When food photography used to be in books and on walls (admittedly, before my time!), it played a much more limited role. Cookbooks used to show carefully faked food photos: perfect and meticulously styled. Think about those 1950s cookbooks. Now, the trend is leaning toward a much more realistic feel.

When I first began food photography, this was already changing. With the Internet, the first time we “taste” a dish at a restaurant is by looking at pictures of the food. It’s our first impression and, very often, the deciding factor in whether we want to eat somewhere. Reviewers often spend a long time taking photos of every dish they eat, and bloggers love to upload pictures of food they create themselves. Our world has become saturated with food imagery.

For that reason, food photography has become more important than ever. While professionals use a lot of equipment, often in conjunction with a food stylist, there are a number of easy things that you can do to improve your own food photography, whether you use a cellphone or a dSLR. I hope you find these tips helpful. I’ve split them up by different phases of photo work.

Related Post: Foodie Friday: Picture Perfect

 Setting up the shot:

1. Keep your stuff clean.

This is a major detail that ruins an otherwise perfect food photo. You have to work clean because even a tiny smudge on a fork makes a difference in the photo. Since viewers are looking at a still image, they’ll catch every little thing in there. It doesn’t take much time to use a cheesecloth and a spritz of vodka to clean up a smear. An alcohol-based cleaner is better to use since it won’t leave streaks.

2. Find a large light source.

Light is one of the most important parts of food photography. If you don’t have fancy strobes, don’t worry. A large window will work just as well. The “clean” feeling you get from a lot of food photos is from a relatively large light source that softens shadows. If you want a bluer light, use the window in the morning. If you want a warmer/yellower light, try late afternoon or evening for an extremely golden light. Never use the pop-up flash.

3. Smooth over your process.

Make sure that there’s a clear path for the food to get in front of the camera, with a minimum amount of fuss. With many foods, you have a very limited time in which it looks fresh. Greens will wilt and cold things will melt, so you want to make sure that set up doesn’t take a long time.

4. If the shadows look too black, add a reflector.

If one side of the picture looks too dark, one way you can easily make the whole thing light up more is by using a reflector. You can use any white or reflective surface as a reflector: a white foamboard, a white shirt, a mirror, or a silvered surface. This is also a good way to get light over to a different area if you can’t set up right next to a window. Remember, light travels in straight lines.

5. If it’s still too dark, use a tripod.

The basic rule of exposure is that there are three factors involved. Generally speaking, if you don’t have a dSLR, you can’t control them. Still, there are ways you can work around this, and one of these ways is by keeping very still. If you don’t have enough light, put your camera on a tripod or lean your wrist against something to keep it very still. This works for dark restaurants, too.

Taking the shot:

 

 

Related Post: Foodie Friday: A Book Brings Food and Love To Life

1. Set your camera to macro mode or use a macro lens.

Food photography embraces close-ups of food. Even if you’re getting the whole dish, chances are it will be very close to your lens. Using macro mode on your camera (or a macro lens) will help you make this look way better. Not getting enough blur? Move closer to the window or use more light.

2. Study what other people do.

Take a look at your favorite food blogs and food photography. See what they do. This is great especially if you’re having trouble with deciding how to make a particular dish look good. Chances are, someone else has done it, too, so why not check out how they’ve done it? Then, you can try variations to decide what works best for you.

3. Shoot from sitting eye height.

Generally speaking, most food photos are taken from slightly above level, from where you would sit. This is the way most people see food, and are going to respond well to it. It’s a good, safe angle. Still, don’t be afraid to try something new. No one has to see it if it doesn’t turn out well.

4. Try a variety of compositions.

Don’t be afraid to get in close or zoom way out. Sometimes food can look radically different depending on how close you are. Try different distances to see what looks best to you. Oftentimes, if the food is textural, it will look more interesting up close. Fill the frame, whether it’s with the food itself, the plate, or the entire surrounding environment.

5. Try different photographing in different phases.

You don’t have to just show the food perfect out of the kitchen. You can also show it in various stages, whether that’s preparation or with a bite out of it. This gives the food context and shows viewers that yes, this is real food.

I hope that these tips were helpful! Remember, the best way to improve your photography is just to go out and do it.

 

Bio –Winnie Jeng is an NYC photographer with a specialization in food and fashion. She was first introduced to photography early in college, where she fell in love with both film and digital work. Now, she works hard with clients to produce commercial work, and likes to do her own photographic artwork in her spare time. Check out Winnie at www.winniejeng.com and follow her on Twitter @winniejeng

 

 

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Coming Up: Learning TV On The Fly 
Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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Ready4Air (Culinary Cues) | Gourmet Holiday Delights From Munich’s Dallmayr Market

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

December 19, 2014 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

By Lora Wiley-Lennartz

This is my Valhalla–the shop I love most in Munich and the gourmet shop I love most of all. No matter how many fancy food shops I’ve been in all over the world, my heart will always belong to Dallmayr.

Once purveyor to the Royal Bavarian Court, the store dates back to the 17th century and carries world-class goods. I discovered this food fairyland on my very first trip to Munich many years ago. Jetlagged and wandering the Marianplatz, I accidentally stumbled through its exquisite threshold and thought I might be in a dream.  

Related Post: Foodie Friday: A Taste Of Portovenere, Italy

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau



Just to be sure, I came back the next day and still had to pinch myself. It was real and I have never been the same since. From then on, all my consequent Munich trips (until I moved to the city) included several visits a week. And my first apartment in Munich was around the corner from Dallmayr. It wasn’t intentional but most serendipitous. Dallmayr is still my favorite store to shop for gifts to bring back to the States.

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

Admittedly, I am not much of a meat eater, and I never eat anything that comes from the sea, but I find myself lingering over the fish and fleisch counters. It’s the display and packaging that enchants me most. Even the rows of sausages and caviar hold my attention.

Dallmayr-Munich-Collage-4

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

 

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau



The employees wear smart uniforms that are very traditional and old-fashioned. Each section is like its own little Aladdin’s cave carved out in the store.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau


My favorites are the coffee, tea, and chocolate nooks. Those gorgeous hand-painted Nymphenburg porcelain containers are perfect vessels for extra special and delicious wares, including their fanciful tea blends and world famous coffee.

In case you want to celebrate your precious purchases, a lovely champagne and oyster bar awaits you.

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The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

At the pasta counter, you can watch the handmade process in action, practically purchasing the goods right from the machine.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau



Here’s the cake counter. Can we tawk? Oy vey. Details are in the delicious.

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau


Even ordinary food is sculpted into edible art. Guests were always impressed when this is served, but you had better get there early. It goes fast.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau


The fruit and vegetable counters carry a wide variety of exotic varieties. Rombutan, anyone?


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Off to the side is an exquisite cigar/tobacco shop. I love to just stick my nose in for a quick whiff. It just smells rich.


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The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau


I’m not even going to get into the wurst and cheese sections. Those could be separate posts entirely.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

 
I love German breads. It’s one of the things I miss most living back in the States. Dallmayr is no disappointment in that department. Also, there are tons of lovely crackers and crisp breads to choose from.
 
The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau


The packaging in the chocolate section is amazing. You can choose between numerous, exquisitely wrapped packages or move over to the mother of all chocolate cases and custom select your own.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau



This place is off the hook at Christmastime with special everything on top of the daily special everything. At Oktoberfest, they don’t miss a beat with these Marzipan souvenirs and, of course, Dallmayr-branded lebkuchen hearts.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau


Let’s take a peek at the wines, champagnes, and liquors and liqueurs. Dallmayr sources and specially makes their own lines of everything, including unusually flavored local schnapps. I once bought white asparagus schnapps here many years ago. Yes, I did.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau



They were having a promotion on local honey when I was there. 


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

 

These candied roses and violets made their way into my shopping bags.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau



Usually, there are live crayfish in that fountain.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau



If you’re looking for something a bit more upscale than the outdoor Viktualienmarkt, or if it’s raining, Dallmayr is the perfect refuge. There is truly something for everyone here.


The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

The Dallmayr gourmet delicatessen in Munich, Germany. Photo credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz of Diary of a Mad Hausfrau

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Lora Wiley-Lennartz- Veteran Talk Show Producer

Meet Lora Wiley-Lennartz

Lora Wiley-Lennartz is an Emmy-nominated producer, media coach, and food blogger who has produced the best of the best TV personalities both nationally and internationally. A passionate home baker, she is the author/creator of a food blog, http://www.diaryofamadhausfrau.com. Lora was the Managing Director of a creative web agency and the Managing Editor of an online magazine. Currently she is the German Food Expert for About.com as well as the Executive Producer of Arise & Shine, a weekend breakfast TV show on Arise.Tv.

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

 

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.  

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#TBT | Foodie Friday: CakeDiva’s Holiday Butter Rich Cookies

CakeDiva-Holiday-Santa-Cookie-225x300

December 18, 2014 | Posted in Culinary Cues | By

 

I like this recipe because you can roll it out and cut it immediately after you mix it up. So let’s get started!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsalted butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon real vanilla flavoring
  • 3 cups flour

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First, heat oven to 350 degrees. In a mixing bowl, cream together butter and sugar for 3 minutes.

Make sure it is with the paddle attachment that self-scrapes the bowl.

Then, put in the egg and vanilla flavoring while mixture is near the 3-minute end. Mix thoroughly.

Sift flour and baking powder together and add mixture one cup at a time to butter and sugar mixture. Mix well after each cup.

Stir in last cup by hand.

Divide dough in half and keep it in a freezer bag until ready for use.

Roll dough out on a non-stick cell pad and cut cookie shapes out by dipping the cookie cutter edge in flour first.

Slip cookie sheet under pad after cookie shapes have been cut out and residue has been taken away.

Bake cookies 8 minutes or more until you see slighty brown edges (remember the cookie still cooks when you take it out of the oven).

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Cool on flat surface.

After they are fully cool, remove from pad and start decorating.

If you have made a lot and they need to dry, they can be stored in pizza boxes until the drying time is fully completed.

You can freeze dough for two months as long as you put plastic wrap on the dough and put them in a freezer bag or container.

Enjoy and Happy Holidays!

 

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Coming up:  Holiday Gourmet Delights from Munich’s Dallmayr Market

 

Charmaine Jones, a.k.a “CakeDiva,” has been baking customized cakes for over 20 years. She has appeared on countless television shows and networks, including Today, ABC Eyewitness News, Food Network, MTV, Whose Wedding Is It Anyway?, and WE TV’s Cake Wars. Her client list includes Whoopi Goldberg, Susan Sarandon, and Beyonce. To contact CakeDiva, click here.

 

 

 

Deborah J. Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell Media Associates – Photo Credit: Debbie Mitchell Graphic – Design: Nay Ayache

 

TV/Social Media Producer Debbie Mitchell is an Emmy nominated producer who is a member of the Producers Guild of America (PGA). She is currently a member of the James Beard Broadcast and New Media Awards Committee. Deborah is Executive Producer of Arise On Screen a global and socially interactive movie review show. If you are a brand interested in Social TV, blogger outreach campaigns, or a blogger or personality interested in television placement follow Debbie Mitchell @SocialTVDeb and/or email SocialTVDeb@gmail.com, or email Nay Ayache on naydmma@gmail.com.

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